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enlisted or officer?
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enlisted or officer?

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Aug 31, 2014, 10:30 *
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Author Topic: enlisted or officer?  (Read 4389 times)
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rubicon923
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« on: Oct 16, 2005, 02:18 »

I'm a 17 year old high school senior currently in the DEP for enlistment in the Navy nuke program after I graduate.  I am a good high school student (A/B) mostly enrolled in honors and AP classes.  My SAT score was 1370.

My ASVAB score was 97 and I did well enough to get into the nuke program without further testing.  My goal was to enlist in the Navy nuke program for 6-8 years and to leave the Navy with a BS in engineering technology and nuclear experience.

However, recently my recruiter has suggested that I consider NROTC to enter the Navy as an officer.  If I were making the Navy a career, NROTC would definitely be the way to go, but it's not clear to me that experience as a Navy officer would help me all that much in looking for a civilian job.

The other advantage to going NROTC is that I could get a straight engineering degree rather than an engineering technology degree. 

I'm interested in opinions from those in the commercial nuclear industry as to whether the officer experience and "better" degree would count for that much when it comes time to look for a civilian job.  Thanks.

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taterhead
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« Reply #1 on: Oct 16, 2005, 03:43 »

I think it is interesting that your recruiter would suggest that AFTER you have already signed up in DEP.

This is really a matter of your own preference.  One choice isn't inherently better than the other.  They are different.

Being a nuke officer is no picnic.  You get all of the challenge of being a nuke PLUS the political ramfications that come to play in the ward room.

In my opinion, the two paths you are considering are so much different that they are extremely hard to compare.   
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cincinnatinuke
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« Reply #2 on: Oct 16, 2005, 06:17 »

They are indeed tough to compare but not impossible.  With either you will do just fine when you decide to get out of the Navy.  I would lean towards getting your degree first, so i have to ask, why with the decent SAT scores and grades in AP classes aren you going to college in the first place?  Most common is that one cannot afford it, but if there is nothing that absolutely prevents you from getting your degree then go get it.

BTW Dont knock the technology degrees.............they have their purpose.
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rubicon923
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« Reply #3 on: Oct 16, 2005, 06:41 »

They are indeed tough to compare but not impossible.  With either you will do just fine when you decide to get out of the Navy.  I would lean towards getting your degree first, so i have to ask, why with the decent SAT scores and grades in AP classes aren you going to college in the first place?  Most common is that one cannot afford it, but if there is nothing that absolutely prevents you from getting your degree then go get it.

BTW Dont knock the technology degrees.............they have their purpose.

Getting a degree first would require 4-5 years and then I would be looking for a job without any real experience.

The Navy enlistment at 6 years is only slightly longer.  If things go according to plan, I would have a degree and several years of nuclear reactor experience as well as money in the bank.  This seems like a better way to go.  However, if anyone thinks I'm wrong, I'm more than willing to listen to contrary opinions.
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joephys
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« Reply #4 on: Oct 16, 2005, 08:03 »

Its very hard to get a BS degree while on active duty in six years (you don't think you can do off duty education while in nuke school).  Remember you will be working full time, and be going to sea.  They have classes on the ship, but your there to work not go to school.  Some people are able to get schooling done, but they are almost always some sort of degree that is specifically made to fit around the navy.  As far as being worried about going to school and looking for a job with no experience, don't worry about that, there are thousands of people that get degrees and have to find jobs with no experience.  The engineering tech degrees are ok, but I have see job postings with the lines "NOT ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY."  You don't have to go NROTC to become an officer.  You can enlist, and try for STA-21.  I am not saying its a better or more likely option, just that it is another option.
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taterhead
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« Reply #5 on: Oct 16, 2005, 10:40 »

It's hard to do in 6, but easily doable in 8.
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Shonkatoys
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« Reply #6 on: Oct 17, 2005, 12:41 »

Both,  Do navy reserve, get your weekend pay to help for college, check on college benefits for navy reserve and take full advantage,  No to NROTC, do OCS if after college if  you want. NROTC waste of credit hours in my opinion and time.  But with your reserve experience and a degree you may find a good job off the bat after college.  You can also be an officer after OCS and stay in the reserve.  Could do OCS right after college and then try to get a job.  Will look good on a resume.  But be aware some employers, even though they may not say so may not hire you if you are still in the reserve.  Its illegal but it may happen.  I took a ROTC ARMY scholarship and wished I did not. Wasted these hours, I should have got a double major, but with 40 credit hours of ROTC I was required to take because of Scholarship I could not.  Also scholarship made me join ROTC  groups that I did not have time for or thought they were a waste,  and looking back they were.
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« Reply #7 on: Oct 17, 2005, 12:41 »

Depends on what you want, or what you think you want. Being an officer will not get you anymore money, or a better job in the commercial world.

Mike
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