Home | Search | Help | Advertising | Contact Us | Bookmark and Share

 

NukeWorker.com, Nuclear Jobs & Nuclear Resumes
Which Navy rating to choose
Thomas Edison State College
Which Navy rating to choose

NukeWorker.com, Nuclear Jobs & Nuclear Resumes
 
Messages:
Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Forgot your password?


Related:

  Nuclear Jobs
  Nuclear News

  OSHA HAZWOPER
  Outage Schedules
  Gold Members
  Donate
  Nuke Shop
  Advertise
 


People online
80 Guests, 1 User

Wojo
View members:
View All Members
View By Letter
Search for User
View Top Posters


NukeWorker Forum
Aug 22, 2014, 02:35 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: Which Navy rating to choose  (Read 25574 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
itrimble
Guest
« on: Mar 31, 2004, 05:15 »

I am also signed up for the Nuke program.  I am also interested in the Seaman To Admiral Program... the question I have is which job in the Navy will let me get the most career advancement options ET, EM, or MM... also will I get to travel more if I don't choose the Sub option.. I want to travel overseas and possibly get stationed in Asia or Europe what are my best options for getting this accomplished ?

 Smiley
Logged
Roll Tide
Nearly SRO; Previous RCO / AUO / HP Tech / MM1ss
Very Heavy User
*****

Karma: 1439
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1876


Those who wait upon God..rise up on eagles' wings


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: Mar 31, 2004, 06:17 »

I split your post to a new thread, since it wasn't exactly on topic and many want to discuss exactly what you posed.

I would recommend the MM path if you are going to get out and go into commercial nuclear ops. I say that based on my experience compared to my classmates in commercial power training from other ratings.

MM also allows some of the top performers in NPS and NPTU to go to ELT (Engineering Laboratory Technician) school. This is by far the best way to get in the RADCON field from the Navy.

After 9 years, my info would be stale on promotion within the Navy by rating, so I will defer to some with more recent salt on the shoulders.

As far as overseas travel, I can assure you Boomers get the fewest port calls inside and outside the US. It's the luck of the draw whether your fast attack hits more ports than your carrier.

There is little available overseas for the Nuclear Navy, but maybe there's still a tender in Italy. Usually you have to do your first tour on a sub / carrier before you can get a tender. It's also a back door to RADCON training.
Logged

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.
slarmox2
Light User
**

Karma: 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 14

Tell Recruiters to use NukeWorker.com


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: Mar 31, 2004, 09:54 »

Why do I hate to type replies so much?

I would love to give you all of the great information regarding your questions that I have acquired in the past 15 months. I have so much to say that I do not have time to type it all right now, in a few hours I will respond completely

Later,

Slarmo,
x2
Logged
GARYGWOODJR
Guest
« Reply #3 on: Mar 31, 2004, 10:41 »

Which rating you choose now depends on what you want to do later.  Do you want to stay in for six and get out or stay for 20 or 30 years.  What do you think you want to do when you get out?

Like Roll Tide said, if you are looking short term go the mechanic route and tell your staff advisor that you want to be an ELT  every 5 minutes when you get to prototype.  No other rate is as high profile as soon as you get to your ship/boat.  As a junior ELT you are sure to have your Captain, Executive Officer, and Engineer watching your do radiological work and sampling the primary and steam generators.

face time+good performance=favorable recommendation for STA 21 programs(seaman to admiral)

If you plan on staying in for awhile mechanics and ELTs have the best advancement opportunities.

If you want to get out and work outside of the nuclear power field then electricians and reactor operators (ETs) have a better career path.  As an electrician you could get out of the Navy as a journeyman electrician if you get into the journeyman program as soon as get to your first boat.

As a nuke if you want to make more money go submarines and if you want to see the world  go to the suface fleet.

Regardless of what you do dont spend all of your time chasing women and drinking so you can get a degree before you get out.

If you have specific questions about navy programs send me an email.   
« Last Edit: Mar 31, 2004, 11:37 by WINGSFAN » Logged
capper
NAO
Light User
**

Karma: 18
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 31

Everybody needs a little nukey!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: Apr 01, 2004, 02:33 »

I have to agree with everything wingsfan said.  He is right on target. 
Logged
Flooznie
Guest
« Reply #5 on: Apr 03, 2004, 02:07 »

Well if you are like me, and you like to spend time with your family and stay clean, pick ET.  ET's generally go home early and you don't get carbon dust or oil on you from working on Reactor I & C.  I can tell you if you are an Electrician on a sub, be prepared to work your butt off.  That isn't an exaggeration.  I've never seen guys work as hard as Electricians.  On a submarine, anything Electrical belongs to E-division, so those guys get woke up to fix stuff, both nuclear and Non nuclear.  The advantage, however, is that if they break stuff, nobody cares, very UNLIKE being RC division (ETs).  As far as being a MM (mechanic), be prepared to spend your first year in Engine Room Lower Level, esp if there aren't any junior guys coming in after you.  M-div generally stays just as late as E-div, and their secondary PMS schedule is HUGE!!!!  Next is being an ELT.  Being an ELT is a sweet job if you get picked in Prototype, but if the M-div chief doesn't like you, guess what, you work for M-div, and being an ELT is a "collateral duty".  Generally this is how the work days break down.
0730-1300: ET work day
0730-1300: ELT work day
0730-1900: E div work day
0730-1900: M div work day

You get the idea.  I thoroughly enjoy being an ET, and I wouldn't change my rate for anything.  You get to shim for Jesus, troubleshoot electronics, and if your Chief likes you and you get qualified, you get to go to ETMS school, which is a VERY good deal.  The advantage is, ALL of the Rates advance very quickly...one electrician on my boat just made Chief in 6 years,......blew me away.  Anyway, make an informed decision.

ET1 (SS)
Logged
capper
NAO
Light User
**

Karma: 18
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 31

Everybody needs a little nukey!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: Apr 04, 2004, 03:13 »

Quote
Generally this is how the work days break down.
0730-1300: ET work day
0730-1300: ELT work day
0730-1900: E div work day
0730-1900: M div work day

I agree with this except for the ELT part.  I was an ELT, and all of RL divs day went like this.

0730-1000 RL divers do surveys and samples.
1000-1900 Work with M-Div.  However, they mostly waited for the ELTs before they started work because "Why should we be working when they are not"--crappy huh.

Thats what my day was like on a 688I sub.
Logged
Flooznie
Guest
« Reply #7 on: Apr 04, 2004, 04:26 »

Capper, what boat were you on?  I was on the Satan (Santa) Fe out of Pearl Harbor.  I am on shore duty now, and I am absolutely loving it!  I am more than "getting it back" from being on the boat and having to sleep at work every 3 days.   I think that is the worst part about the boat, duty days.  Jesus christ, having to sit in front of that panel for 12 hours a day every 3 days was about enough to kill me.  But I do have to say, shore duty is absolutely worth it!  That is one decision I am GLAD I made! 

ET1 (SS)
Logged
bigdcruz
Guest
« Reply #8 on: Apr 04, 2004, 09:50 »

Whoa Capper!  sounds like you managed to get on some unlucky boat.  i'm on my second sea tour now and i've never known any elt's to work for m'div unless it was to provide some useless radcon coverage.  a boat that utilizes rl div to support mechanical work must have a pushover for a LELT.  but you are partially right, my guys won't do a damn thing in the morning if the elt's can't manage to support some drape work that was scheduled a week prior for first thing this morning.  but that problem only affects m'div.  i've had to go rounds with my chief trying to prevent the integration of m and rl div.  guess what?  he's and ex elt.
Logged
cavalry
Guest
« Reply #9 on: Apr 05, 2004, 05:54 »

Ok, I have to chime in here. I was an ELT stationed aboard the USS Carl Vinson in the early 90's. We were in overhaul while the Gulf War was going on. From my perspective ELT's had it the worst but not by much. We were on three section duty along with the rest of Reactor Department while the rest of the ship was on 5 section duty. Those of us that were ELT's usuallystood two watches concurrently on duty day. TLD reader watch lasted 24 hours and shouldn't have been a big deal except there was a constant stream of people needing their TLD's read due to Reactor Compartment entries. There was also ELT watch which we normally had for 16 hours (the chief would take 8 hours) and during which we had to do blowdowns on 4 steam generators every 8 hours, run radcon for the reactor compartment etc etc etc. To top it all off we were required to do 4 hours of classroom training every day so we NEVER went home before 6pm. I never worked less than 100 hours in a week while onboard. The saving grace was that I loved my job and looked forward to it every day.

In my opinion? Dont' be a nuke if you want it easy or short hours. Do it if you want a challenge and a great career.
Logged
pimpala
Guest
« Reply #10 on: Apr 10, 2004, 05:44 »

I agree with what a lot have said.  However, not many have talked about the Surface Nuclear community.  I am now on my 4th tour on a Nimitz class carrier.  I just left shore duty in San Diego working on Subs for 3 years, so I have gotten to know thier routine and can honestly compare them. 

First thing to remember, you can volunteer for Subs at any time during the training pipeline, but once you volunteer, you can't undo it.  Wait till you get to prototype before making that decision.  This way you will meet both Sub and Surface instructors and be able to make a more informed choice.

Right now on my ship, EM's have the best routine because the entire surface fleet is overmanned with them.  It is not uncommon to see them leaving the ship prior to 9am when in port.  ET's are not too far behind.  MM's work the most and have the dirtiest jobs to do.

That being said, I think MM is probably the best rate for long term advancement in or out of the Navy.  By the time they are Senior in Rate qualified, they are already done with 70%-80% of their Watch Supervisor qualification.  ET would be second, followed by EM (if you want to stay in the Nuc Field).  EM's learn a lot of Power Distribution stuff, but that doesn't really help much with Watch Supervisor Quals or, from what I can tell, the Civilian Nuclear Industry.

The EM joke is we are smart enough to turn switches and strong enough to turn valves, but what I think really happens is you get someone that is a dillitante in all things and an expert in nothing (I am proof of that Cheesy)

As far as Sub or Surface, Having seen what the Sub nukes go through, I am glad I am on Carriers.  We have just about 100 Nuc EM's and we only deal with the propulsion plants.  We have Conventional EM's to fix all the other stuff on the ship.  We are in 5 section duty vice 3 for subs.  I have been to Naples, Rhodes Greece, Corfu Greece, Rio De Janero, Valapariso Chile, St. Thomas, Hawaii, Yakuska Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Dubai UAE, Muscat Oman, Hobart Tazmania, and Perth Australia.  I don't know too many Sub guys that got to see all that.  Their is also rumor that a Nuclear Carrier will replace the Kitty Hawk in Yakuska Japan a few years down the road, so Nucs may have a chance for Overseas tours in Japan.

Hope that helps,
EM1 (SW)
Logged
Flooznie
Guest
« Reply #11 on: Apr 11, 2004, 06:23 »

You've done 4 tours and you are still a First Class?
Logged
JassenB
Guest
« Reply #12 on: Apr 12, 2004, 07:25 »

Lotsa good posts on here...glad to see people chiming in with their experience.

I was a surface sailor. The greatest thing to me about being on a carrier was watching the sunset/sunrise over an endless expanse of bright blue-green water from the fantail. You can't do that on a sub. Smiley

From a career standpoint, remember that all nukes have accelerated advancement, and the re-up bonuses are incredible.

I was an EM, and I loved my job. I got to get dirty every day, had the apprenticeship going, and still had time to work on my degree. As an EM, I liked the fact that I worked with both electrical and electronic systems, but also on the straight-up mechanical stuff. You'll stand watches in the control rooms and in the plant, and your stuff powers the entire plant, so you get a wide breadth of knowledge about all the plant systems, probably more so than MM's and ET's.

The down side that I have discovered is that the job opportunities on the outside were quite limited. Most nuclear jobs I applied for wanted either ELT's or ET's to be RO's.

In fact, I ended up working as a Plant Utility Operator for a biotech drug plant after I got out, which meant that I did nothing but stand watch for a living in an industrial plant -- never got to fix (or break!) anything.

I did that for a year, and then quit to go back to college. I've been out for 3 years now.

Just my 2 cents.

-Jassen
Logged
Roll Tide
Nearly SRO; Previous RCO / AUO / HP Tech / MM1ss
Very Heavy User
*****

Karma: 1439
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1876


Those who wait upon God..rise up on eagles' wings


View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: Apr 12, 2004, 08:57 »

You've done 4 tours and you are still a First Class?

Some of the best Sailors I worked with didn't make it past first class. The advancement cycles are pretty rough at times, and if the Surface EM's are over-staffed, then they don't make many Chiefs.

Don't confuse NPS and NPTU with the Fleet: you still have a lot to learn!
Logged

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.
Rick63
Guest
« Reply #14 on: Jul 08, 2004, 11:27 »

How are Nuke recruits selected for ET, EM or MM at RTC?

Any help/information is appreciated.

Thanks
Rick63
Logged
dav8
Light User
**

Karma: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 15

Tell Recruiters to use NukeWorker.com


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: Jul 08, 2004, 11:43 »

Sometime duing RTC you get asked which one you want.  It all depends on who you are at boot camp with and how many of each rate they need.  It's based on the needs of the Navy and your educational background.  It you want MM, you will get it for sure.  EM's a little harder and ET is the toughest to get because: there are less of them, and the majority of people ask to be an ET.  I think that out of the 20 or so in my boot camp division who asked for ET, two of them got it.  My advice is put in for MM and try to get ELT school.  You will do the least work out of all of them.
Logged
Phurst
NRRPT-HPT
Gold Member
*

Karma: 1119
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 701


One in a row!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: Jul 08, 2004, 12:10 »

When I went the smartest in school went to RO, the next went ET, and the dumbest of the dumb went MM. I was MM. The smartest of the MM's went ELT. I'm a smart dumbass and went ELT. Hindsight proved me wise.
Logged

Today is the best day of my life! HSIITBS!


'For the quality of owning freezes you forever into "I" and cuts you off forever from the "we". - Steinbeck
RCLCPO
Moderate User
***

Karma: 59
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 72


4 shots of espresso with 4 shots of hot water....


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: Jul 08, 2004, 02:43 »

During week 4 of boot camp, all nukes meet with a Nuclear Field Advisor to discuss the issue of rate selection.  The choice of ET, EM or MM is made based on several factors: your educational background (was it auto shop or computer science?), your hobbies (wire houses? fix car engines? computer repair?), what you'd like to do in the Nuclear Navy (what the different jobs actually are like when out in the fleet), and the needs of the Navy.  The Navy is well aware that if someone actually likes their job, it's a whole lot better for morale than if they're stuck doing something they hate doing.  Real effort is made to try to get everyone what they want.

As for the numbers, there are, for any given Nuclear Engineroom, more mechanical personnel required than anything else.  The ratio of personnel as MM/EM/ET's is about 4:3:2.  Also, as the MM "A" school is shorter than the ET/EM track, the Navy can accept more MM's.

All applicants should be made aware of the responsibilities of each of the ratings, including the maintenance side, so they can make an informed decision about what they'd like to ask for when they meet with the NFA at boot camp.
Logged

There ain't nothin' worse than calm seas, the sight of land, and non-quals.....
Roll Tide
Nearly SRO; Previous RCO / AUO / HP Tech / MM1ss
Very Heavy User
*****

Karma: 1439
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1876


Those who wait upon God..rise up on eagles' wings


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: Jul 08, 2004, 05:00 »


All applicants should be made aware of the responsibilities of each of the ratings, including the maintenance side, so they can make an informed decision about what they'd like to ask for when they meet with the NFA at boot camp.

Did I ever tell you the one about a civillian Machinist who decided all on his own that being a Nuclear Machinist Mate would be the perfect fit for him? He didn't mention his pre-conceived notions to the recruiter, just told him to put him in as MM. (No one will question that choice, or try to talk you out of it because it fits the needs of the Fleet!)

When he got to my sub, he had figured out he wouldn't really be a machinist for a nuclear plant, but we did make sure he got machine tool operator so he could run all our equipment on the sub. He enjoyed his 6 years in, and last I heard was running a "Trash to Energy" plant.
Logged

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.
methman
Guest
« Reply #19 on: Aug 16, 2004, 11:23 »

Play your strenghths and your interests. I will make the job a bit more bearable!
Logged
mdaniels
Guest
« Reply #20 on: Aug 13, 2005, 10:21 »

My son is going in feb 06. So I am an outsider to all this. this sounds stupid but  I know what a mm , em and et are
but what is elt?
Logged
hamsamich
Very Heavy User
*****

Karma: 1227
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 701


And did I hear a 9er in there?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: Aug 14, 2005, 12:23 »

ELT stands for "Engineering Laboratory Technician".  Mechanics are usually the only ones who can be an ELT in most situations.  Usually chosen in prototype, the lucky mechanic has to complete his quals as a mechanic first, then he will go to ELT school and qual at the same (usually) prototype as an ELT.  About 10% or so of Mechanics are chosen to go on to be ELTs.  ELTs can either be half mechanic half ELT depending if   they are surface or sub.  Subs usually make the ELT do as much MM stuff as ELT stuff but this still varies somewhat on the ability of the ELT and how RL and M Div decide to do things.  Surface ELTs are mostly just ELTs but some can qualify and do MM stuff.  An ELT performs the radiological and water chemistry duties aboard ship, such as primary coolant sampling and swipe contamination surveys.  When I was an ELT on baord the USS Norfolk (fast attack sub) we usually stood a mechanic watchstation called "Engine Room Forward", so we could do samples at the secondary sample sink while on watch.  RL div is usaually the coolest division on baord the sub, followed by M Div, E Div, then finally, RC Div.  Uh-oh, the backlash on  this one outta be funny.  RL div is usually the smallest division of nucs, very tight-knit as I have seen.  ELTs wear many hats, especially on board subs. 
Logged

"No, she gets a special cologne. It's called Sex Panther by Odeon. It's illegal in nine countries. Yep, it's made with bits of real panther. So you know it's good."
mdaniels
Guest
« Reply #22 on: Aug 14, 2005, 08:09 »

thanks, but that raises another question. I served on convential carrier 30 yrs ago, H-Div , so what is RL and RC div
consist of?
Logged
hamsamich
Very Heavy User
*****

Karma: 1227
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 701


And did I hear a 9er in there?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: Aug 14, 2005, 10:27 »

RL Div.  Reactor Laboratory Div
RC Div.  Reactor Controls Div
Logged

"No, she gets a special cologne. It's called Sex Panther by Odeon. It's illegal in nine countries. Yep, it's made with bits of real panther. So you know it's good."
irmechanek
Guest
« Reply #24 on: Aug 14, 2005, 02:47 »

Here is the thing... you don't REALLY get to choose. I would say almost everyone I know wanted to be an ET, for whatever reason, but that does not mean you will get it. what happens is that in Boot Camp you get pulled aside into this room, you watch a video, you ask questions to a senior chief, then you make a list of what you prefer. If you want to be an MM, you'll be an MM, but that's the only guarentee. They will pick for you what you will be, based on your test scores.  I am thrilled to be an MM. first, school is shorter. Second, I will be actually using tools and fixing things, as opposed to pushing buttons.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.35 seconds with 26 queries.
RSS for Messages RSS for Pictures RSS for Pictures