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Sep 30, 2014, 10:52 *
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Author Topic: NUPOC Questions  (Read 31526 times)
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elig3
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« on: Jun 29, 2004, 10:17 »

Hello, I'm a soon to be Senior in Computer Engineering and have been seriously considering a career in either the Navy or Air Force.  I really like the NUPOC program, and was wondering if anyone knew how hard it really is to get into it.  I have a 3.6 and am in pretty good shape.  Any additional info on NUPOC would be great!  Thanks!
« Last Edit: May 06, 2005, 08:54 by Rennhack » Logged
gtnuke
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 08, 2004, 07:49 »

I was a computer engineer in college and made it through NUPOC. Requirements from year to year are typically based on department head demand shifts, so the number of spots varies. The less spots available, the more competitive.

In my opinion, if you make it through all the initial screenings (your recruiter, regional recruiter, etc) and get invited to the interview, you should make it. They screen the applicants pretty harshly before going to NR. There's no sense in wasting Admiral Bowman's (or whoever the next NR Director will be here shortly) time.

Its a heck of a deal and I recommend the program, but be prepared for a lot of long hours and work demands.

(Also, before you go for the interview, study the packet they give you. Its the best way to prepare).
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 09, 2004, 02:30 »

If you send me your personal contact information I'll have your local Navy office send you the information you need.

Just e-mail me at Nuke1_port@cnrc.navy.mil to maintain your privacy.
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elig3
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 13, 2004, 11:58 »

Thanks for the information!  I'm starting the application progress, wish me luck!
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jcam
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 10, 2005, 01:35 »

I am just wondering what my chances of getting into the program are.  I know there are a lot of post relating to this, but I couldn't find any new ones to reply to.

I am a 20 year old sophomore honors student at Tulane University in New Orleans majoring in Biomedical engineering.  My GPA is a 2.7 as of right now, which I think is pretty low.  But I noticed another Tulane grad on this site had a 2.48, so I'm guessing that Tulane is looked upon as a little tougher than other schools, among other factors.  I am active and fit, can pass the physical exams with no problem.  I've got a B average in my past calc and physics classes. 

Other than good recommendations and  higher GPA, is there anything else I can do to help myself out?

I've read that the 10000 signing bonus isn't guaranteed.  What is the qualifications for getting that.  I wouldn't be asking about money, but even with scholarship, Tulane costs a lot of money.  If I get the monthly wage coming in, the government won't give me as much in need grants, so it is an issue.  I assure you, money is not a major motivation for joining the program, but debt isn't fun.

Again, I apologize for making a new post entirely dedicated to me.  And feel free to ask any other applicable questions about my background.
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 10, 2005, 10:18 »

I am afraid I can't help you with your question, but I would like to tell you not to aplologize for making this thread. That is what the forum is for... you have a question and those that can help try to do so.

Welcome to NukeWorker and the best of luck in starting your nuclear career. You will find it interesting and probably very rewarding.
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skyhawk_172r
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 10, 2005, 05:28 »

Hello everyone. This is my first time on this board but I have been reading through many of the posts and I must say I have learned a lot about the Navy and its programs from the honest opinions and feedback from the members here.

I am comtemplating joining the Navy. I am a senior in the Mechanical engineering schhol  at Purdue University. I had called a Navy Recruiter in Indianapolis to inquire if I would be a suitable candidate for the NUPOC program. The only problem is my GPA isn't taht impressive. The engineering program at Purdue is pretty tough and expensive as well and with a 20+ hr work schedule along with a full time courseload I only had about a 3.0 at the time. My second semester was the worse where I had to retake a couple classes too. The Recruiter immediately told me that I didnt have a shot at an officer program and gave my contact info to a recruiter on campus who is calling me to take the enlisted route.

After this semseter I should be above a 3.1 GPA. I do believe that a 3.1 in a mech engg field at purdue is a little tougher than getting a 3.1 in management or history and after hearing some of the horror stories about some peoples bad experiences with recruiters tryin to fill their quota I am wondering if I do have a shot.

Would anyone be able to shed some light on this? What does the application process involve, step by step? Also, seeing the emphasis they place on grades, would I have to show my transcripts and to whom and when? Having had to retake a couple classes it would show on the transcript. Another concern is the background check. Would they be calling my professors or school officials or only references and profs names that I provide to them? I know it's a lot of questions but I would like to know exactly where I stand and what could affect/hurt me and this seems to be the best place.

If not the Nupoc program are there any other officer positions that I would be suitable for that are not so academically demanding. I wanted to get into avaition technology before I joined college but I chose Mech engg after Sept 11 hurt the aviation industry. Would anyone know what the requirements to get in as a Navy pilot would be if the Nuclear option is out?

I would really appreciate any input. Thanks.
« Last Edit: Apr 10, 2005, 08:53 by RDTroja » Logged
taterhead
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 10, 2005, 09:02 »

Hey, ease up on the History majors. Smiley
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 11, 2005, 06:50 »

I am not a recruiter in the Navy nor have I ever been one so take everything I say with a grain of salt.  I have, however, been both an enlisted and commissioned nuke and I currently work in the NR program so I have seen and been involved in nuke officer accessions.  In the current environment anything less than a 3.4 GPA from a good school is simply not going to cut it as a NUPOC. The only people I've seen break that rule in the last 2 years are priors.  Former enlisted nukes get cut more slack than you might imagine.  I actually think that anything less than a 3.0 the district recruiter can't even consider without a waiver.   The 10,000 bonus is a maximum.  You may get significantly less depending on what you choose to do and when you come in.  remember that NUPOCs go one of three ways - 1. Go to NR as an engineer (good GPAs from good schools only) 2. Go to Power School and teach enlisted students college level "engineering" - basic thermo, chemistry,etc.  3. Go be a line officer - a submarine or surface warfare officer - Real Navy.  The biggest bonuses (long term) go to line officers.   NUPOC billets are based on all three needs.

As to security clearance, they can (and often do) investigate your whole background.  Your National Security Questionnaire is very detailed including where you've lived last 7 years (include dorms), jobs for the last 7 years, etc.  They often bang on you neighbor's door, etc. If you have anything you don't want to admit to you should either square up to admitting or forget the program.  Don't forget that a security clearance is periodically renewed so as long as you hold one you'll be answering the same questions.  I will never forget the NNPTC Admin Officer (newly arrived, LDO type) being escorted from the building after his clearance was suspended (August 1998 for anybody who was there).

I know I haven't answered all the questions, so if you have anymorelet somebody else take a shot or give me some smaller chunks.
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skyhawk_172r
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 12, 2005, 01:18 »

Thanks for the reply Charlie.  Sad well it doesnt look like I much of a chance at the NUPOC program then. Its going to be near impossible to pull my GPA to a 3.4 at this point. As far as the security clearance, theres nothin that I have to admit LOL. I have pretty much been a student and worked at an internship in a microelectronics company along with some campus jobs. But i am not sure what the exact purpose of the clearance is. Is it meant for security purposes alone or more to get opinions (positive or negative) to evaluate me as a potential candidate. Would i be providing them with references to talk to or would they just track down random ex professors/school officials, ex co workers/bosses, family/frnds etc to get opionions about me. Do they go the whole mile or would i be providing references like most other job applications.
Lastly, Charlie u mentioned you took the enlisted route and then got commisioned. I dont know if the Navy cash program is still offered, but if I enlisted and completed my degree through the Navy cash program before i joined as an enlisted member, what are my chances of getting into OCS from there.
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« Reply #10 on: Apr 13, 2005, 05:54 »

The purpose of your security clearance is to ensure you an individual trustworthy enough to entrust with information which, if released to others, could damage our national security.   It is not designed to be part of the interview process.  They don't care about your suitability for the job, only your reliability.

OCS is a crap shoot.  OCS (not OIS) exists primarily to fill the needs (Bodies) of the officer community that other commissioning sources do not provide.  Before applying to OCS you pick two (maybe three) designators, or communities (SWO, SWO-N, Aviator, Supply, etc.), you want to apply for.  How many slots are available depends on what the needs of the Navy are (how many officers are needed) and how many bodies USNA/NROTC/NUPOC/NECP/ECP/etc. can provide.  So it becomes a crapshoot based upon the economy (good times - officers leave in droves so there are many billets, bad times - nobody gets out so few billets), the Navy's situation (are we rightsizing, shifting the communities, etc.) and sheer luck of who comes out of other commissioning sources. 

That being said there are always some billets.  Some are there just so enlisted people with degrees can compete for officer programs, other are there because there are always some gaps.  The other to remember about applying to OCS when you're enlisted is that you're competing with other enlisted folks  -so they'll compare apples to apples.  My point is that if you apply to OCS you're competing against other Fleet sailors who are all ready at sea, P.O. 1s, warfare qualified, EWS qualified, etc.  You're not comepetitive, in general, until you get to the Fleet (which is two years after enlisting in the nuke program).

My final thought is - if you enlist with the sole purpose of being an officer, you'll experience a lot of heartache and frustration.  The only option you have available with a degree is OCS.  You'll see your classmates getting picked up for STA-21, USNA, etc. and you are shut out of OCS because you're not competetive yet

I DID get picked up OCS after 2 years at sea (qualified EWS, SS, etc.) but I wasn't always happy in NFAS and NPS when guys with lower GPAs were headed off to college and commissioning and I was stripping and waxing my barracks room.
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Hughes
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« Reply #11 on: Apr 19, 2005, 03:38 »

Hey Skyhawk, sometimes it is not just GPA that makes the determination, if you want it bad enough, they can make exceptions. Don't let small setbacks keep you from it. I have been in the application process for almost 2 yrs had to jump through more than one hoop. made it through....
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jasonmsmith
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« Reply #12 on: Apr 21, 2005, 01:02 »

I came into the navy through NUPOC back in 1999.  I am now a LT on shore duty after my first sea tour.

Back in 1999, pretty much anyone with a pulse could get into NUPOC.  I had a GPA of 3.2 in Mechanical Engineering, and that was good enough.  I believe that it is a bit more competitive now, though.  I would think with your GPA, you should have a good shot.
« Last Edit: Sep 16, 2005, 05:05 by jasonmsmith » Logged
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« Reply #13 on: Apr 26, 2005, 07:06 »

NUPOC apps are getting tougher. In 99 we were hurting for folks (Internet boom, why stay in?).  The tables have turned a little as the economy isn't as hot (not to mention there is a little right-sizing going on).  In addition, the Iraq war hasn't hurt our recruiting (unlike the Army).  All in all, the competition is much tighter.  A 3.1 GPA might not cut it.
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skyhawk_172r
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« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2005, 05:17 »

Hello folks, thankyou all for your replies. This is the best place i feel to get unbiased information and differrent and honest opinions. I have just completed another sem and I am happy to say i did give My GPA a slight boost. I am also red lining a couple courses that were general electives that I had got Cs in and enrolled to take a couple Gen Eds in their place for this summer to give my GPA a boost. MY GPA is a 3.28 and shd be over a 3.3 if i do well in the gen EDs. I think I should try for NUPOC.
Would anyone know what the best way to get about this application process would be. By that I mean, who do i contact (are there seperate recruiters for enlisted and officer), what forms do I fill, what info and documents do i provide and what does the physical test involve. Basically what happens prior to being selected/rejected for an interview.
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flyguy2487
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« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2005, 08:34 »

hi, i am currently a high school senior with a 4.0 GPA and any extra curriculars. I have been accepted to Penn State Main Campus. I am looking to go into the nuke program. I applied for an NROTC scholarship but didnt get it because i was to far down the list to get one. I am looking for info on the NUPOC progam and how i can get involved. My grandfather served in vietnam and I have been looking at the navy as my career choice for many years. So any info about the program would be great thanks. My email is flyguy2487@hotmail.com. Thanks
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joephys
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« Reply #16 on: Aug 31, 2005, 09:52 »

I know its been asked before but I'll ask again.

Does anyone know if the NUPOC program is pretty competitive right now?

I was enlisted, but not a nuke, I was an AT2(AW/SW).  Im SELRES now.  I started at a community college on active duty and have an associate degree with a 3.89 GPA.  I am worried that they may look down on the community college credits.  I am in my first year at WWU (physics and math double major) with a 4.0 GPA after one quarter.  I am sure my GPA will remain high.  My PRT scores are not so great, and I am working on improving them.  My general thought process right now is to wait a while to get some more University classes under my belt and to improve my PRT scores, but does any one else have any comments or suggestions for me?

Thanks in advance for any replies.
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« Reply #17 on: Sep 08, 2005, 05:15 »

NUPOC is tight right now but a 4.0 GPA in Physics should make you competitive (although I don't know what school WWU is), especially if you're willing to go DIO (teach at NPS).  The selection board still seems to favor engineer degrees over other technical degrees for the line officers.  Although I have no firm numbers to back me up, it seems as if the engineering majors have a leg up on the other 'technical' majors (Physics, Math, Computer Science, Chemistry).  As another note, NRHQ is hurting for ChemE. guys.  A ChemE major would be helpful.
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joephys
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« Reply #18 on: Sep 14, 2005, 07:22 »

Thanks for the input.  WWU is Western Washington University.
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TheMongol
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« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2006, 05:53 »

does anyone know where i can get help or get answers to the Nupoc study guide questions? I emailed one of the NTO for help but he never replied. Any help would greatly appreciated.
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jamdaws
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« Reply #20 on: Jun 21, 2006, 12:14 »

If one were to go into the NR position and serve their 4-5 years and then decided they wanted to remain in the navy...is it a common thing to go ahead and jump into the NUPOC SWO/n route and keep the good ol' navy nuke career going?  I think that would be ideal as you would have all the theory and the practical under your belt for when you eventually went into civilian life. 

Since promotion potential is practically nil in the NR route you would have to transition into somewhere or get the boot no?  Since you already have some nuke knowledge, it makes sense to transition into NUPOC SWO/n.

Are there any pitfalls or "unlikelyhoods" for this idea?

Thanks for any info?
« Last Edit: Jun 21, 2006, 12:16 by jamdaws » Logged
javacodeman
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« Reply #21 on: Jun 21, 2006, 11:30 »

Speaking as a former DIO instructor at NNPTC, do what *interests* you.  If you want to be a NUPOC, you'll be shooting yourself in the foot if you go to NR.  It's possible to make that transistion, but your first 6 years after NR will be NNPTC, NPTU (yes you'll still have to go through the pipeline), and then 4 years of sea life.  Now if you've been keeping up, you're now at your 10 year point in your career, up for O-4.  All of your year group will have about 4 more years experience that you will at being a nuke officer.  (No one sitting on our promotion board will think that your first four years were quality experiences as a nuke officer.)  All I'm trying to say is that you will be fighting an up hill battle the rest of your career to be competitive with your year group.

I personally didn't want to go to sea, so the NR position or in my case the DIO position was what interested me.

javacodeman
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jamdaws
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« Reply #22 on: Jun 21, 2006, 11:48 »

I totally agree...I will do what interests me (which is very much the NR route). 

I guess I forgot to mention the source of my question.  The reason I asked is because I have heard and read several places that being a DIO as an NR really limits you to that initial 5 year hitch.  After that you essentially get pushed out into the civilian world. This is due to the fact that being promoted is unlikely since you are competing against the well-rounded, experienced NUPOCs.

So while the NR route is my main interest, I still want to be able to finish out my military pension (20+ years).  So how can I do both...or can I?  So I must transition to somewhere...right?  Let me know if these facts are untrue.

Thanks for the info.
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spoonman031
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« Reply #23 on: Jul 20, 2006, 12:20 »

Hi,  I'm currently a sophomore at the University of Florida and an aeropsace engineer major.  My main question is what sorts of jobs will I be qualified for after the Navy.  The reason I ask this is I have much interest in propulsion area.  So what are the chances I may find a job somewhere possibly research Nucelear Space Propulsion.  As of right now, since I have no experience in really anything, I'm not sure I want to enter the NUPOC program because I don't want to be stuck operating a nuclear power plant my whole life after the Navy.  Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.
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« Reply #24 on: Jul 21, 2006, 06:17 »

Thanks for your service to our great country!
There are many other jobs that your Navy Nuclear experience would be good preparation. Combined with a relevant degree, NASA (or NASA contractors) would be a good fit.

I was disappointed at the wage scales for NASA contractors, and in my position commercial nuclear pays much better. Currently there so many people passionate about the space program that wages are suppressed. If that is the situation after your military service, you may also choose an alternate. 
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