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What you wish you had known before joining the Navy
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What you wish you had known before joining the Navy

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Styrofoam
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« on: Nov 20, 2010, 02:53 »

I'm about to head down to MEPS and I would like to know what you wish you had known before you joined.

Thanks! Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: Nov 20, 2010, 03:29 »

That you will not see the parts of the world that you want to see.
That your education is up to you and only you.
That the job is no where near as challenging mentally as you would think (you follow procedure and if that doesn't apply someone else makes the desicion on what to do, with or without your recommendation)
That even though the recruiter (and just about every one who tries to get you to go nuke) says your hot poop, you still smell like poop. ;-)


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JustinHEMI05
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« Reply #2 on: Nov 20, 2010, 05:37 »

That STAR reenlisting is for suckers.
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spekkio
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« Reply #3 on: Nov 20, 2010, 08:53 »

-There are only three root causes for issues; lack of knowledge, lack of engagement, or material issues. The root cause is best determined by asking why at least 3 times.

-That I would continually and routinely be put into situations with little to no training, be expected to succeed, and ridiculed for not knowing the correct answer.
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« Reply #4 on: Nov 21, 2010, 07:46 »

-There are only three root causes for issues; lack of knowledge, lack of engagement, or material issues. The root cause is best determined by asking why at least 3 times.

-That I would continually and routinely be put into situations with little to no training, be expected to succeed, and ridiculed for not knowing the correct answer.
Why was there lack of knowledge?  Why was there lack of engagement?  Why were there material issues?
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The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.
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« Reply #5 on: Nov 21, 2010, 09:22 »


-That I would continually and routinely be put into situations with little to no training, be expected to succeed, and ridiculed for not knowing the correct answer.

Your boat obviously has a terrible command climate.  If things are as you say here, and have said previously, then why aren't you efforting to make things better?

Are you a future "Brownfield"?
« Last Edit: Nov 21, 2010, 09:24 by Gamecock » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: Nov 21, 2010, 09:49 »

Your real job is janitor.
Most of you time will be spent either bored out of your mind watching meters and gages or scraping rust with a wire brush.
The smartest people in the navy are the ones that qualified for nuke and then chose another rating they might actually enjoy.
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JustinHEMI05
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« Reply #7 on: Nov 21, 2010, 01:33 »

 Enjoying Show
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Liquid_fuel
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« Reply #8 on: Nov 22, 2010, 09:13 »

That EN meant enlisted nurse, at least that is what my recruiter told the hot blonde who walked in the office after me,,

she bit, and <yr later my recruiter was axed for lying to the girl...... she got a free ride from the Gov't as well.

Well spent tax dollars at work
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IPREGEN
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« Reply #9 on: Nov 22, 2010, 10:49 »

You will get whatever you want as long as it is what the Navy wants. Coast, ships, schools...
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« Reply #10 on: Nov 22, 2010, 11:56 »

I would never have believed ( at 17 ) just how proud I am every day to have served in the U.S. Navy.
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« Reply #11 on: Nov 22, 2010, 06:48 »

Your boat obviously has a terrible command climate.  If things are as you say here, and have said previously, then why aren't you efforting to make things better?

Are you a future "Brownfield"?
I am not a future "Brownfield." I can see where the tone of my post came off as hateful, but it's just the way the Navy is structured. Allow me to explain:

At OCS, I learned nothing about Navy culture. I learned about Marine culture and expectations. The two are dramatically different at times. You learn about Navy culture/terminology when your O/I tells you to use the gunwale to estimate range and you sheepishly have to ask "what's a gunwale?" because no chief or officer in the Navy asked you that question in a checkout because they never thought someone would lack that much Navy culture knowledge.

You show up to a ship and you get handed a division, having 0 training on how to be an effective division officer. Yes, your chief is supposed to train you about the technical aspects of the job -- and they do. However, they can't train you regarding the expectations of what you are supposed to do or accomplish as a DIVO because they don't think like your DH or XO. You just have to play the trial and error game enough until you 'get it.' And by the time you do, it's off to a new division where you may or may not get blindsided again about why you're not meeting requirements you never knew about in some random program that's the flavor of the week/month that your CPO never mentioned because he doesn't think it's important (after all, if he did think it was important you wouldn't be getting asked why it's AFU).

Doesn't really get better for DH's...there is no ENG/NAV/WEPS school. Sure, there's SOAC where you learn how to be a sat OOD. But aside from that, you're just thrown into the job and hopefully the EDMC/ANAV are good enough to keep you from getting fired until you can learn the ropes.

The only aspect of your job that you will be decently trained on ahead of time is the aft watch standing part of your job... and even then the utility of 7 U/I's at a S5W plant is questionable.

Change things for the better? This isn't something that I can really change at this point, it's just an obstacle to overcome. And I have and will continue to do so. It's not a result of bad command climate, I actually like my CoC... it's just the way 'OJT' is structured in the submarine world.
« Last Edit: Nov 22, 2010, 06:53 by spekkio » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: Nov 23, 2010, 09:46 »


You show up to a ship and you get handed a division, having 0 training on how to be an effective division officer. Yes, your chief is supposed to train you about the technical aspects of the job -- and they do. However, they can't train you regarding the expectations of what you are supposed to do or accomplish as a DIVO because they don't think like your DH or XO. You just have to play the trial and error game enough until you 'get it.' And by the time you do, it's off to a new division where you may or may not get blindsided again about why you're not meeting requirements you never knew about in some random program that's the flavor of the week/month that your CPO never mentioned because he doesn't think it's important (after all, if he did think it was important you wouldn't be getting asked why it's AFU).

The guys that you releived bagged you.  At turnover, you should have been given the gouge about the little things that are important for your new job that you probably don't know about.  Nobody can know everything (except maybe HydroDave and Co60  Wink ).

You need to learn from the mistakes of others, an when you make mistakes, learn from them also.  Then, pass that knowledge on when you leave or change jobs.  Thats how successful commands work....unsuccessful commands keep making the same mistakes over and over  and over.
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« Reply #13 on: Nov 23, 2010, 11:06 »

That the terms of your enlistment vary depending on the recruiter.  There were many different incentive programs in effect at my time of enlistment.  I got one of the worst ones and didn't know better.  Others got deals like $20K for college (mine ended up being about $7K for college) who went in at the very same time.

Join USAA as soon as you get in.  It is a very good deal for insurance and car loans and the like and you can only join while on active duty.

The reserves can be a very good deal.  Consider staying in the reserves when you leave active duty.

IT is a lot easier to get an ROTC or Academy scholarship once in the service.  Of course you have to be motivated to make it happen.

Delayed entry is a very good program and gives you time in service seniority (which makes your pay go up faster).

If you are unsure as to what you are going to do with your life, consider a 4yr instead of a 6yr active duty enlistment.  All in all the Navy and the nuclear program was a good experience for me, but I could have left a couple years earlier.
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« Reply #14 on: Nov 23, 2010, 01:31 »

I am not a future "Brownfield." I can see where the tone of my post came off as hateful, but it's just the way the Navy is structured. Allow me to explain:

At OCS, I learned nothing about Navy culture. I learned about Marine culture and expectations. The two are dramatically different at times. You learn about Navy culture/terminology when your O/I tells you to use the gunwale to estimate range and you sheepishly have to ask "what's a gunwale?" because no chief or officer in the Navy asked you that question in a checkout because they never thought someone would lack that much Navy culture knowledge.

You show up to a ship and you get handed a division, having 0 training on how to be an effective division officer. Yes, your chief is supposed to train you about the technical aspects of the job -- and they do. However, they can't train you regarding the expectations of what you are supposed to do or accomplish as a DIVO because they don't think like your DH or XO. You just have to play the trial and error game enough until you 'get it.' And by the time you do, it's off to a new division where you may or may not get blindsided again about why you're not meeting requirements you never knew about in some random program that's the flavor of the week/month that your CPO never mentioned because he doesn't think it's important (after all, if he did think it was important you wouldn't be getting asked why it's AFU).

Doesn't really get better for DH's...there is no ENG/NAV/WEPS school. Sure, there's SOAC where you learn how to be a sat OOD. But aside from that, you're just thrown into the job and hopefully the EDMC/ANAV are good enough to keep you from getting fired until you can learn the ropes.

The only aspect of your job that you will be decently trained on ahead of time is the aft watch standing part of your job... and even then the utility of 7 U/I's at a S5W plant is questionable.

Change things for the better? This isn't something that I can really change at this point, it's just an obstacle to overcome. And I have and will continue to do so. It's not a result of bad command climate, I actually like my CoC... it's just the way 'OJT' is structured in the submarine world.
You are in a tough environment.  You are gaining experience.  You have been placed in situations that made you uncomfortable.  I think we’ve all been there.  What you do with the lessons will make or break you.  As I gained experience I came to realize I learned a lot more about leadership during times of adversity than I ever did in a classroom or in a book. 

When you get the chance to effect change, remember what you’ve learned and either:
1. Don’t set your people up for failure –or-
2. Recognize they will benefit from the experience just like you did, as uncomfortable as they will feel.
-In both cases, have the tools in effect to prevent things from getting out of hand.

As I gained experience, and confidence, I wanted to be the guy to make that tough decision because I trusted myself more than anybody else.  I also learned empowering my guys to be responsible for important projects helped them and me.
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« Reply #15 on: Nov 23, 2010, 01:37 »

You are in a tough environment.  You are gaining experience.  You have been placed in situations that made you uncomfortable.  I think we’ve all been there.  What you do with the lessons will make or break you.  As I gained experience I came to realize I learned a lot more about leadership during times of adversity than I ever did in a classroom or in a book.  

When you get the chance to effect change, remember what you’ve learned and either:
1. Don’t set your people up for failure –or-
2. Recognize they will benefit from the experience just like you did, as uncomfortable as they will feel.
-In both cases, have the tools in effect to prevent things from getting out of hand.

As I gained experience, and confidence, I wanted to be the guy to make that tough decision because I trusted myself more than anybody else.  I also learned empowering my guys to be responsible for important projects helped them and me.



To add one thing to this fine statement ~ As leaders both in the Navy and in the civilian world We are only as successful as the men we lead Enable them, lead them and they will make you a success

There will be no real answer on what leadership style is right. Often the most successful leaders we've seen in history have had a variety of leadership styles, as they have learned to adapt to the personnel they have. All of our personnel will respond differently to different leadership styles, what makes a good leader is understanding our personnel and putting them in situations to be successful. When they are successful we are successful.

yes I know  Dead Horse Off Topic Thread Hijacked  but it had to me said.
« Last Edit: Nov 23, 2010, 01:46 by Liquid_fuel » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: Nov 23, 2010, 01:46 »

That being responsible for:
1. Operations
2. Training
3. Maintenance and Modifications
4. HR
5. Supply Chain
6. Corrective Action Program
7. Safety
8. QA (Subsafe)
9. NA (Meeting requirements)
10. Professional Development of my juniors
11. Housekeeping
12.  Succesion planning
all at the same time...to name a few, made me a T-Baller.  Wink
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The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.
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HydroDave63
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« Reply #17 on: Nov 23, 2010, 02:22 »

all at the same time...to name a few, made me a T-Baller.  Wink

and a janitor   Wink
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« Reply #18 on: Nov 23, 2010, 02:35 »

I'm about to head down to MEPS and I would like to know what you wish you had known before you joined.

Thanks! Smiley

Everything... but I don't think you can be prepared even if you are told what to expect. It is an experience that every one takes something different from and most of the ex-Navy people I have met have done just that even if they continue on into traditional nuclear careers after the Navy.

   I do wish I had learned earlier to be more gung-ho when on duty and to get farther away from anything Navy on "my time".
   The strips that tend to grow up outside of Military bases are full of people who make a living out of pulling money out of young sailors pockets, even though this was obvious I found myself in some of those stores anyway.
   When in a foreign port your friends may be fun to party with but don't miss the opportunity to see the country and people of the land you are in away from the tourist traps and not with any loud and obnoxious shipmates (the "Ugly American").
   I wish I had known not to try and make sense of some things, they just are what they are and will probably never change.

   There is a little parable about a little bird who did not fly south with the rest of the migrating flock, I wish I had heard it earlier in my career.

Once upon a time there was a non-conforming sparrow, who decided not to fly south for the winter. However, soon the weather turned so cold that he reluctantly started to fly south. In a short time ice began to form on his wings, and he fell into a barn yard, and almost froze to death.  

A cow passed by and crapped on the little bird. The sparrow thought this was his end. But instead, the manure warmed him and defrosted his wings.

Warm and happy, able to breathe he started to sing. Just then a large cat came by and, hearing the chirping, investigated the sound. The cat cleared away the manure, found the chirping bird and promptly ate him up.

The moral of the story:

1. Everyone who poops on you is not necessarily your enemy.

2. Everyone who gets you out of the poop is not necessarily your friend.

3. If you are warm and happy in a pile of poop - keep your mouth shut.



Are we back on topic now  Huh  Wink
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co60slr
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« Reply #19 on: Nov 23, 2010, 02:36 »

and a janitor   Wink
If it wasn't for the shaft seals leaking 800 gal/watch through the bilges, I would've had to wipe up even more oil from leaking systems.   I still hate risics today.  Old cold war S5W boats...that first navy tour always seems to be bittersweet.

Unrocking the LiBr A/C system....
Lining up the D/G to snorkel in a steam suit...
Dragging a pressurized fire hose through 2 compartments in an OBA and a blackout screen (to simulate black smoke)...
Tearing apart the ASW system and putting it back together each refit...

In the words of the immortal Jack Nicholson, "Good times....Noodle Salad".  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8shdlcJjAJ8


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co60slr
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« Reply #20 on: Nov 23, 2010, 02:38 »

1. Everyone who poops on you is not necessarily your enemy.

2. Everyone who gets you out of the poop is not necessarily your friend.

3. If you are warm and happy in a pile of poop - keep your mouth shut.
Honestly LOL....so true!
 Enjoying Show
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« Reply #21 on: Nov 23, 2010, 03:05 »

and a janitor   Wink
After nearly 25 years I had risen to janitorial supervisor and inspector.

To quote an old family friend:
"I don't know anything about ________ (insert skill or topic), but I can sure tell you when it's been done right."
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The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.
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« Reply #22 on: Nov 23, 2010, 04:16 »

If it wasn't for the shaft seals leaking 800 gal/watch through the bilges, I would've had to wipe up even more oil from leaking systems.   I still hate risics today.  Old cold war S5W boats...that first navy tour always seems to be bittersweet.

Unrocking the LiBr A/C system....
Lining up the D/G to snorkel in a steam suit...
Dragging a pressurized fire hose through 2 compartments in an OBA and a blackout screen (to simulate black smoke)...
Tearing apart the ASW system and putting it back together each refit...

In the words of the immortal Jack Nicholson, "Good times....Noodle Salad".  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8shdlcJjAJ8



Don't forget the four-foot applicator on the fire hose.
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« Reply #23 on: Nov 23, 2010, 04:54 »

If it wasn't for the shaft seals leaking 800 gal/watch through the bilges, I would've had to wipe up even more oil from leaking systems.   I still hate risics today.  Old cold war S5W boats...that first navy tour always seems to be bittersweet.

Unrocking the LiBr A/C system....
Lining up the D/G to snorkel in a steam suit...
Dragging a pressurized fire hose through 2 compartments in an OBA and a blackout screen (to simulate black smoke)...
Tearing apart the ASW system and putting it back together each refit...

In the words of the immortal Jack Nicholson, "Good times....Noodle Salad".  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8shdlcJjAJ8



Now Co60 you are bringing back some serious memories

you could be standing behind manuevering when a CW pump breaker blows out
direct the ventilation duct on the Port SSTG thurst bearing to prevent the thermometer from exceeding 180 degrees
tape the nub Yn above the port SSTG (more room) with a bucket and brush
piss in yes the piss funnel fwd of the EPM on the 688 (yes i know it is crude but a fact of life)
lock someone in the AMR2UL head and give them a shower
to name a few
« Last Edit: Nov 23, 2010, 05:07 by Liquid_fuel » Logged

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co60slr
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« Reply #24 on: Nov 23, 2010, 05:03 »

Don't forget the four-foot applicator on the fire hose.
+K if you remember where it was stored.   Wink
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