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prototype... filter or pump?
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prototype... filter or pump?

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Oct 22, 2014, 03:36 *
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Author Topic: prototype... filter or pump?  (Read 35291 times)
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Cycoticpenguin
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« Reply #75 on: May 24, 2011, 12:00 »

Greetings,

I've been reading through posts on here with great interest because my son is interested in joining the Navy. He originally wanted to become a corpsman. However, due to several factors, among them: there would be a long waiting list, my wife's strong objection to his being attached to a Marine combat unit, the high score he recorded on the little "pre-Asvab" test they give in the recruiter's office, he's now looking at becoming a nuke.

Anyway, that's why I'm here.

As to the morale and attitude issue, please know that in my industry, semiconductor manufacturing, we still look very favorably upon resumes of former Navy nukes. Other than the almost certainty that they are quirky, we know their breadth of knowledge makes them good candidates to be equipment maintenance technicians in our fabs.

whats the pay like :p


Cool, good luck to your son on his endeavours and the trials he will face if he goes nuke Smiley

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Marlin
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« Reply #76 on: May 24, 2011, 04:01 »

Quirky... I like that. Very polite.  Wink

For some of us we prefer Eccentric Lords of Technology     Coffee
« Last Edit: May 24, 2011, 04:02 by Marlin » Logged

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« Reply #77 on: May 24, 2011, 06:22 »

whats the pay like :p


Cool, good luck to your son on his endeavours and the trials he will face if he goes nuke Smiley



Base pay for a fresh out with no experience in semiconductors would be in the neighborhood of $50K-$60K.

Thanks for the good luck wishes.
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Cycoticpenguin
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« Reply #78 on: May 24, 2011, 06:23 »

Base pay for a fresh out with no experience in semiconductors would be in the neighborhood of $50K-$60K.

Thanks for the good luck wishes.

thats not too shabby!! Smiley

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« Reply #79 on: May 24, 2011, 08:15 »

Thanks for posting, Cleaver.

Good luck to your boy.
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« Reply #80 on: May 26, 2011, 06:41 »

Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!  Pump!
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« Reply #81 on: May 29, 2011, 09:32 »

I had 14 guys that worked under me in RadCon in '99, many of which were new from prototype...this is when I first questioned the changing standards of the nuclear Navy. It had nothing to do with the level of knowledge of these kids...more about their attitudes. The economy was booming and it was harder to recruit then...I got that and all worked out well in the end with these guys.

I was staff at NPTU Charleston '00-'04 and I don't think the role was any different from when I went through in '94-'95. A-School & NPS were the filters and prototype was to get these kids to the fleet where they were desperately needed. They had proven themselves to a point and were trainable and trustworthy (always exceptions). We always called it a pump as well...a pump with minimal leakage (drugs & such), but a pump all the same.

As far as morale and attitudes...I was on the 'Mobile Chernobyl' (CVAN-65) and of course we had times when it really sucked, but it wasn't all the time. I personally couldn't have asked for a better way to get my experience...it's what we make of it. I certainly didn't expect $100k jobs when I got out and anyone who does needs to do some research or risk serious disappointment!
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monkbirdduke
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« Reply #82 on: Jun 08, 2011, 07:12 »

I graduated about 4ish years ago...I'm not sure if it was a filter or a pump.  I think if word came down that they needed more nukes, the leadership would just put alot more pressure on the staff to get the dumb kids qualified.  I don't know if that really counts as lowering the standard though.  We had massive training holds at prototype when i was there, so we all knew the systems as well as the staff (maybe not the operations though).  I only saw one of the officers on my crew fail out.  Everyone else passed, and deserved to.  I'd say it's worth finishing though; I just got out three months ago, and picked up a 70K job as an I&C tech at a water company in Sonoma. 
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« Reply #83 on: Jun 26, 2011, 12:46 »

Update time. My son scored a 64 on the NAPT and is in the Nuke program. He was sworn in to the DEP last week and his ship date to boot camp is November 9th. We're not sure how that worked out when we've seen other people posting ship dates that are much later, but he's quite excited.
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Marlin
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« Reply #84 on: Jun 26, 2011, 07:27 »

Good luck to your son...


Semper Fi to you...
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« Reply #85 on: Jun 27, 2011, 12:04 »

Good luck to your son...


Semper Fi to you...

Thank you.
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« Reply #86 on: Jul 03, 2011, 12:29 »

Well a wise person once told me:

Every generation has complained about the generation that came after them, yet we continue to survive
Not only are they continuing to survive, the other E in the surface fleet just gave out big MONEY (which is roughly 39 Ford Mustangs) to those who are keeping the model of surface nuclear power alive and well. They may be too [insert  Old Man Old Man here] for many of your standards, but it's still steaming and selling jewelry and letter jackets on the messdecks. We also know that with it's new CO, it's remembering the dawn and dodging fog at every opportunity!

We as LPO's, LCPO's, DIVO's, PA's, etc...need to stop complaining about the level of knowledge todays newbie's have.  The current system is not going to change.  So,  it is a leadership challenge that WE as leaders need to overcome.

BTW...when I was a young nub MM3 back in 1990 I occasionally heard the "old timers" complaining about the level of knowledge of the nubs.   I'll bet if you if you went into the way back machine and emerged in the 1970's you probably would have heard some crusty MM1 complaining about the level of knowledge of his nubs.  Same thing over and over. 
I don't always agree with Gamecock, in fact I don't even like the SEC or the old ball coach... but this is one of the best statements on the subject that I have seen in some time. It was probably all that submarine time that gave him this Rocky insight on the topic.

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« Reply #87 on: Jul 03, 2011, 07:13 »

I am pretty sure this thread is dead?!?!?  But, I better make sure ...

Quote








Dead Horse
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Drayer
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« Reply #88 on: Jul 04, 2011, 01:48 »

I am pretty sure this thread is dead?!?!?  But, I better make sure ...

Dead Horse
Off Topic Off Topic Thread Hijacked Off Topic Thread Hijacked Love Group Hug I'm with stupid Sarcasm Off Topic Boo Hoo Devious Duplicate Flamer
Was that Dick Cheney in that video?



As for the thread:
« Last Edit: Jul 04, 2011, 02:07 by Drayer » Logged
Gamma Glue
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« Reply #89 on: Jul 05, 2011, 09:56 »

Pump.

I was an instructor there for almost 4 years (left last year) and was a TC before I left. Most of the attrition is due to poor performance on exams, there isn't much we can do about that, or from students that "can't take it" and choose the medical route.
As far as exams go, the 50% exam is only to determine your performance and see how well you'll do on the Comp. If you fail the 50 twice, nothing happens. Infact, no one even looks at if if you pass, so essentially I could take your exam, plug random numbers into the computer to ensure you pass and shred the exam with out ever looking at it. However, we would rather grade it to see the ridiculous answers students provide (everyone loves a good laugh). The Comp is different, if you fail twice, you're out. That might sound like a filter, but we tell you exactly how to answer the questions ("shotgunning" is allowed and pretty much required if you want to do well), and most good End of Card checkouts should have common Comp questions in them, mine always did. Plus there have even been a few who got to take the test a third time. Students have failed so many watches they have to get another page added to their books (the most I saw was over 20 watches and he still failed after NR declined his third Final Watch Board). When we get you ready for your final oral board we pretty much tell you exactly what is going to be asked, which is obvious if you have paid attention the the types of questions up to that point. If I wanted someone to pass I knew what to ask and what to stay away from. It pretty much like a script. I could still tell you what they will ask during your oral board (as long as you are an MM) The only student I failed at an oral board was basically doing the exact opposite Immediate Actions, twice (killed everyone the first time and tried to on the second casualty), hard to pull a passing grade from that. There are plenty of students that I thought would be terrible as an operator, had poor grades, poor performance, and a bad attitude that still made it. Infact, my entire crew thought one should fail, we told his board members to fail him , and they still passed him. (This is usually due to the civilians, they always pass you the second time). A friend of mine is on a sub with one of our ex-students who passed but shouldn't have, and the kid is still terrible, can't do a thing right and sucks at life in general. That being said, prototype has to be a pump, it wouldn't work any other way. Some people don't even see a need for it. It wasn't designed to make you the worlds best operator. When you show up to your first Ship (or boat for the tubers) all they expect you to do is talk on phones, take a set of logs, know how to qualify and (oddly enough) live on your own. It's funny but one of prototypes teachings is how to live in town on your own. Most sailors are out of high school and have no idea how to, which is why we are so into you personal life and it's one of the first places we look when things start to go bad.
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