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jamdaws

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Degree Worthiness
« on: Mar 27, 2007, 07:06 »
Just curious about the quality of different degrees in the eyes of the civilian hiring managers?  My degree is in Biochemistry, should I be thinking about going back for NE or ME or am I good as is?  Thanks for the info. all.

Rad Sponge

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #1 on: Mar 27, 2007, 08:23 »
Just curious about the quality of different degrees in the eyes of the civilian hiring managers?  My degree is in Biochemistry, should I be thinking about going back for NE or ME or am I good as is?  Thanks for the info. all.

How does biochemistry relate to nuclear engineering?

Wouldn't your skill set be best suited for chemistry or environmental controls as it relates to this industry?

Why go backwards when you already have a lucrative skill set?

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #2 on: Mar 28, 2007, 06:55 »
Are you a current Navy Nuke with a Biochemistry degree?
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jamdaws

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #3 on: Mar 28, 2007, 11:53 »
I'm about to be a navy nuke.  I am currently in the processing phase to go the NR-officer route.  I am trying to think ahead as to the best way to set myself up when I get out.  If the NE or ME degree would better serve me then I will probably do that.  My degree is a dual major (molecular biophysics) so I have a good Math and Physics background.

alphadude

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #4 on: Mar 28, 2007, 12:00 »
NE hard to find and good pay to start. however that will be your industry for life, whereas with an ME you can go from industry to industry.

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #5 on: Mar 28, 2007, 12:31 »
Consider going back when you are sure what you want. Either would be well-suited to commercial nuclear power. Some peopel choose to get a business or other non-technical degree for balance.
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NucEng for Hire

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #6 on: Mar 28, 2007, 02:33 »
In hindsight, I think the best use of college for someone wanting to go commercial nuclear would be a Mechanical Engineering degree program with Nuclear Engineering courses filling your techincal elective requirements. At Ohio State this amounted to an NE minor. Spend a summer or two interning at a nuke plant, and 4 years from now the utilities will be drooling at the experience and knowledge you'd be bringing to the table as a new hire.
« Last Edit: Mar 28, 2007, 02:41 by NucEng for Hire »

jamdaws

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #7 on: Mar 29, 2007, 06:35 »
Yeah, that's what I figured.  I am extremely interested in Engineering anyway.  Chemistry is my first love but I definitely wrestledwith the choice of ME or Chem.  Thanks for the advice...I think I am going to try to finagle an ME degree if not before I get out, then right after.  I am an education freak anyway so I will enjoy the extra learning.  Thanks for all the input guys, much appreciated.

Offline cincinnatinuke

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #8 on: Mar 29, 2007, 08:33 »
In hindsight, I think the best use of college for someone wanting to go commercial nuclear would be a Mechanical Engineering degree program with Nuclear Engineering courses filling your techincal elective requirements. At Ohio State this amounted to an NE minor. Spend a summer or two interning at a nuke plant, and 4 years from now the utilities will be drooling at the experience and knowledge you'd be bringing to the table as a new hire.

The Univeristy of Cincinatti does something similar.  5+ years and you walk away with a BSME and a MSNE.  They no longer have an undergrad. NE degree.

Rad Sponge

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #9 on: Mar 29, 2007, 10:04 »
Yeah, that's what I figured.  I am extremely interested in Engineering anyway.  Chemistry is my first love but I definitely wrestledwith the choice of ME or Chem.  Thanks for the advice...I think I am going to try to finagle an ME degree if not before I get out, then right after.  I am an education freak anyway so I will enjoy the extra learning.  Thanks for all the input guys, much appreciated.

Best of luck to you.

Offline CharlieRock

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #10 on: Mar 30, 2007, 07:31 »
If you're going the NR route, are you going to the Bettis Reactor Engineering School (BRES)?  All the NR HQ directs inputs go as far as I know.  BRES will get you most of a Master's from the Naval Postgraduate School in Engineering Management, Old Dominion U in Engineering Management or Penn State University in Nuclear Engineering.  By most, I mean you will still need a few courses to complete via distance learning.  Also, your shop at HQ may allow you to get a degree during the day if you can finagle your schedule.  Two guys I worked with in the F shop, and one in the K shop, took advanatge to get their MBAs.

jamdaws

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #11 on: Mar 31, 2007, 07:31 »
Yeah Charlie Rock, as far as what I have been told you are correct about D.C. and BRES.  That U. of Cinn. program looked pretty bad-a** but I don't think they would admit me since I already have a degree (unless I read their info. wrong). I may just have to wait until after my navy service before I could give any serious attention to a new BSME/NE or even a MSME/NE.  I really dug that RPI program for those in the New York area. I may try to luck my way into some orders out there (although I doubt NR is allowed out there).  Anyway, thanks for all the kick-a** info guys.  Any other programs you know about, let me know.  Thanks again.

thenuttyneutron

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #12 on: Mar 31, 2007, 08:54 »
I earned a BS in Nuclear Engineering in 2004 from Texas A&M University.  I am starting to wonder if not having a masters will keep me out of the future jobs that will be opening up for Reactor Engineers at all the power plants.  Will obtaining a SRO license negate this and allow HR to overlook the lack of a masters degree?  I think I would enjoy being a licensed SRO and qualified RE.  With the license a SRO can make core modifications and lead the refueling with the RE quals.

It is impossible for me to go back to school due to a rolling 12 hour shift schedule.  The schools are starting to get packed and becoming very selective.  I earned the degree at a time when people talked about the possibility of my college department shutting down.  The year I graduated was also a very slow year for people getting my degree; only 202 people in the entire nation earned this degree in 2004.

Offline cincinnatinuke

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #13 on: Apr 01, 2007, 07:04 »
JamDaws,

If I am not mistaken NR has a presence in NY because of the Prototype site.  I can remember a few staff members crossing over to the "dark side" and seeing them again only this time in civialian clothes and on the other side of a clipboard asking the questions.

NN,

I do not think that sans a Masters Degree, you will be hard up to get an engineering job, entry level wise that is.  In fact coupled with SRO experience I would imagine you become lucrative for many a task.  Though it seems from your post you have a particular angle you want-you mentioned RE quals and leading a refuel.

I think graduate studies are a great avenue to pursue, but there are a lot of options out there from MS to MBA to traditional to online/distance.  You got an idea what you want to get your secondary in? 

Offline tr

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #14 on: Apr 14, 2007, 11:47 »
Regarding whether or not to get a Masters - it seems to be a utility specific thing.  My old utility did not put much of an emphasis on it, while my current utility does (and even has a ton of PhD's running around the site).  Personally, I think a NE undergraduate is just as valuable (within the nuclear industry) as a non-nuclear BS with a nuclear MS.

One issue with a major like biochemistry is that it limits you more than a engineering degree does, as many of the technical support jobs at plant sites need an engineering degree.  My utility has completely separate pay scales for engineers versus other technical staff.

As far as the SRO/Reactor Engineer issue, about half the RE's I know were licensed at one time (all as STAs) before they became REs.   At most plants, becoming an RE is a learn on the job process, with someone with a NE background needing on the order of 2 years to become really competent.

Getting an SRO is great if you can do it, but it typically is an extremely selective process (at our plant, most license classes have only 1 or 2 engineers, and they're usually either future STAs or people being groomed for higher management).

The SRO opens you up for positions all over the plant, as most departments have need for a person with operating experience.

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #15 on: Apr 21, 2007, 05:46 »
jamdaws,

If you like chemistry and engineering and what to go back to school, why don't you do ChE ?  That's what I did and I found a pretty good job in the nuc industry with it.  You can even get a job that is more ME focused if you decide you don't like chemistry.  ChE is pretty versitile.  It just seems like a pretty good fit for you, if you're looking for engineering. 

Mike

jamdaws

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Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #16 on: Apr 21, 2007, 11:04 »
Thanks for the advice...I thought about ChemE.  I was afraid I would get stuck in some polymer factory or something.  Granted, I don't know a whole lot about career potential for Chemical Engineers.  You are right though, Chemistry and Engineering are two of my big interests (along with math, physics, biology...lol). That's why I got the degree I did: Biochemistry-Molecular Biophysics, it encompasses chemistry, biology, and physics all underscored with math.  I will definitely try to educate myself a little more on ChemE.  Thanks for the suggestion.

Offline ulenie

Re: Degree Worthiness
« Reply #17 on: Sep 19, 2010, 08:55 »
Just curious about the quality of different degrees in the eyes of the civilian hiring managers?  My degree is in Biochemistry, should I be thinking about going back for NE or ME or am I good as is?  Thanks for the info. all.

I wonder if you still visit the forums.  I am in the same boat you were three years ago.  It would be much appreciated if you can update us on the decisions you have made.  Thanks.

 


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