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Author Topic: The 2007 monetary value for the NRRPT on an hourly basis?  (Read 74896 times)

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mconner51

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I have been tasked with coming up with an houly value for rewarding technicians who pass the NRRPT. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Offline retired nuke

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Back when I passed as a roadie, Bruce gave $1/hr to those that had passed it, plus reimbursed the cost of the exam. Heck, I got a call at home congratulating me from the Blue Office... :D
Now as a house tech, there is no increase, but they will reimburse the cost of the annual dues...but I think my company pays more for the contractors that are NRRPT..... :-\

Hey, at least I'm home at night with the family.... ;D
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Offline RDTroja

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That is a subject for great debate and it depends on what you use your technicians for (how much 'skill of the craft' you are counting on.)

Some plants use contract techs to meet minimum requirements (warm bodies) only and all of the real HP work is done by the house. Some plants virtually turn over containment to the contractors and depend heavily on the talents of the technicians to keep them out of trouble. Naturally an NRRPT tech is more valuable in the latter situation than the former. Some of the value of an NRRPT tech is not having to worry about them spending a week in training and then failing the screening test and having to be replaced (or operating short.) The most I have gotten for being NRRPT was an additional $2/hr ($23 vs $21 in 2003) from Exelon. One plant I worked in didn't even recognize NRRPT as a way of exempting the NEU (or whatever it is now called) test... I had to take the test 'cold' because I was not told I would need to take it.

If you value the knowledge that NRRPT techs (should) bring to your site I think about a 10% premium is fair... if you are going to rely heavily on the NRRPT techs and expect them to 'carry' others, then a little more would be appropriate. If you are going to have them working in HP staff positions then you need a 'HP Specialist' (or some similar title) position and that should pay more (maybe 25% to 50% depending on the duties.)

Of course I pulled most of these numbers out of thin air to start the debate. I am willing to bet that others will have different opinions.
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Offline Already Gone

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I know I'm repeating myself, but it has been a while.
The most I ever got for NRRPT was $1/hr.  I would have gotten the same $1/hr anyway because I had been a Sr. HP for greater than 7 years.
Since it costs money to maintain your NRRPT registration (Dues, memberships to HP Society or ANS, CEU's) and I never missed a job for not being current, and I got the same money as a current NRRPT tech, and some sites don't care if you are current as long as you have the certificate, I let it lapse 13 years ago.  As far as I'm concerned it is worthless - monetarily.  However, I am speaking as an employee.
Speaking as an employer, I wouldn't hire an HP who didn't have it or couldn't get it.  That changes things considerably.
In my opinion, it is worth at least $5/hr above any other tech on your list - including the ones who have 7+ years of experience.  So, if you are paying an additional $1/hr for 7 year Seniors, you should be paying at least $6/hr more for NRRPT with 7 years.  No NRRPT registered tech should be getting less than $30/hr.
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Offline hamsamich

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5 more bucks an hour!  I would surely get my NRRPT then.  Like Beer says though, I don't think many people get more money with it.  I've heard many techs complain about that.  Every once in a while you hear of a 50 cent or 1$ an hour kicker.....

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From the house mouse position at Cook: Those of us that have the NRRPT don't receive anything extra for it.  The company does mantain the membership dues and does keep track of the accredited training hours. They also pay the costs associated with obtaining it: casses, testing fees, etc...

There has been some talk of a new requirement being introduced for Sr. RPTs needing the NRRPT to maintain their position within the company, but that talk has faded somewhat with the RPM leaving. We shall see what tomorrow brings. Extra money would be nice.
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The NRRPT SHOULD be worth about 25%, but there seems to be a gap in the process because I've seen several NRRPT Techs who aren't worth standard tech pay, including one who wanted to shut down the process of removing the cavity lights from the water because one of the ropes read 4Rad/Hr. If it were a certification that truly identifies superior techs, it would be worth something. As it is, it's just a trivia test.

Offline Brett LaVigne

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Unforunately for the road tech. there is no incentive what so ever to get it.  It costs too much money and time to outweigh the few places you can get an extra buck.  I don't however think that studying and passing that exam makes you a better tech.  What it does do is show you that an individual has the initiative to reach for more knowlege and mental capacity to learn and retain information related to the field.  This to me would make someone a better "bet" for employment when all you have is a resume sitting in front of you.

When it comes right done to it, it is about the greenbacks and I won't be spending any of them on this certification until it is financially in my favor. 
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Tech A

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Just proves you can pass another test  but doesnt prove your a better tech.  ( NEU, meter, FFD,)  So it means nothing and that means zero monetary dollars.

Offline RDTroja

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Just proves you can pass another test  but doesnt prove your a better tech.  ( NEU, meter, FFD,)  So it means nothing and that means zero monetary dollars.

Sounds like someone that never took the test.

It does not mean nothing. Granted, it does not guarantee that you will be a better tech, but it is an indication that you know a bit about your profession. Some very good techs have never taken the test and some very good techs have taken it and not passed... but someone that has taken and passed the test has proven that he/she has a desire to learn his/her craft and a willingness to take the time to improve themselves in their chosen field. There is no guarantee that someone that has passed the NRRPT won't fail another test, but it is a good indication that the individual has a better chance to pass the NEU (NUF - I remembered what it was called) test. That makes for a better bet to get in the door and a better bet to know more... no guarantees. At a technician level it is not absolutely necessary to know the information that the NRRPT tests... but it helps. At a higher level than technician (ALARA, Rad Engineer, HP Specialist) it certainly is a benefit.

Having said all of that I would take one good technician with practical experience and a good work ethic over 10 NRRPT techs that want to play cards all night. Also, there is nothing in the NRRPT that tests whether or not you can read a meter, take a representative smear survey, cover a primary valve breach or figure out what to do when your world dissolves in front of you with a jumper in the S/G Bowl. The technician that knows his stuff, can think on his feet, and actually likes doing his job is the most valuable and only your reputation will let people know if you are one of them. Unfortunately no one has discovered a good way to measure and reward that combination without any favoritism... and the 'good old boy' network is alive and well in Nuclear Power.
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Offline PWHoppe

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Just proves you can pass another test  but doesnt prove your a better tech.  ( NEU, meter, FFD,)  So it means nothing and that means zero monetary dollars.
   ???

How exactly does one study for the FFD  ???  ::)

RDTroja...great response couldn't have said it better myself   ;D
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 12:44 by PWHoppe »
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Tech A

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Why doesnt a person who received a degree in health physics make more money?  People are talking about NRRPT but it seems it would be harder to show knowledge in all fields than just being able to pass a test that only tests RP technical questions.  As far as passing the FFD test its a lot harder than passing the meter test.  And as far as helping in higher up positions (alara) its the same thing, experience matters and the good ole boy systems lives there more than any other except maybe supervision.  Trodja is right in 99.9 percent of his post, but an NRRPT degree doesnt matter in the world of a contractor because it doesnt get you more money than what its worth.   Now being an NRRPT tech does show that the person does have initiative to make themselves more knowledgeable, but so does a college grad.  I can tell you what my degree means to me, self satisfaction.  But to the company, nothing.  When talking about is the NRRPT degree worth it after the cost of annual dues and all IM sure its not, but how bout the guy getting the health physics degree, was it worth it after tuition, rent , books and living on oodles of noodles?  Sure it says I had initiative, but that went out the window when Im sitting across the Alara tech who was a junior 6 months ago telling me  how to do things.  Again BeerCourt is very knowledgeable and most of all Trodja, but being an NRRPT or college degree in the contractor world means nothing espicially when the people who hand out checks believe they are  worth nothing.
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 02:45 by Tech A »

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Because a Liberal Arts degree is worthless in this field.  RP Technical knowledge is directly applicable to doing RP work.  Note also that NRRPT requires five years of experience prior to taking the exam.  It requires the recommendation of a professional who is either a RRPT or CHP.
If people are just signing those forms and not verifying the experience, then it is their lack of integrity that is failing the system.  Frankly, being truly qualified to TAKE the NRRPT makes you a better tech than many.
I agree that taking the NRRPT exam is no guarantee of performance in the field.  It is merely an indication that an individual posesses the technical knowledge that a Senior Technician should posses.
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Tech A

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I think a liberal arts degree is worthless in the RP field also ,except it does show people you have to know how to read and write , but Im pretty sure almost all will agree with that.  Who has an liberal arts degree?
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 02:47 by Tech A »

Austria

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I think a liberal arts degree is worthless in the RP field also ,except it does show people you have to know how to read and write , but Im pretty sure almost all will agree with that.  Who has an liberal arts degree?

Years ago, a couple of Region III NRC inspectors I worked very closely with told me, "heck, most of us are just a bunch of otherwise unemployable liberal arts majors." when I asked what kind of degree you needed to get a job with them.

Tech A

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Well then Beercourt and I stand corrected about the liberal arts degree. lol

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Unforunately for the road tech. there is no incentive what so ever to get it.  It costs too much money and time to outweigh the few places you can get an extra buck.  I don't however think that studying and passing that exam makes you a better tech.  What it does do is show you that an individual has the initiative to reach for more knowlege and mental capacity to learn and retain information related to the field.  This to me would make someone a better "bet" for employment when all you have is a resume sitting in front of you.

When it comes right done to it, it is about the greenbacks and I won't be spending any of them on this certification until it is financially in my favor. 

National Registration of Radiation Protection Technologists
Full Reimbursement of the exam fee if NRRPT exam is passed. Bartlett also offers 50% off textbooks and 25% off correspondence course by Dr. Dan Gollnick.



Offline hamsamich

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pretty much any degree from any accredited college will help somewhat. even a psychology degree.

getting back on toepic, maybe not help with NRRPT $/hour, but I've seen some jobs require or prefer NRRPT, that is worth something.

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Seems to me the price one would pay for an NRRPT would be dependent on the plant.  Our contracting companies dont really care unless the plant their staffing wants them, but of course there are techs that are requested and they dont get anymore money either.  If for some reason they need NRRPT's then paid them more if none will come for the price your giving.  To put a price of five dollars more is crazy, if thats the case why are there NRRPT techs next to me for the same wages?   When I get to a plant I cant tell the difference between an NRRPT or any other techs.  I can tell how some slugs got their positions, but other than that we all look the same in yellow.  There are a bunch of ways to be a good tech, but NRRPT is just away of dressing up your resume just like being a college (health physics) degree holder.  It does get your foot in the door and takes your resume to the top when there are unknown techs applying for the same job, but is it worth an hourly amount?  It shows they have some smarts, but it doesnt mean their worth more money.  If you really think your worth more than the other techs then dont take the same wages.  I think Im the best unemployed tech there is, but that doesnt make me more money than the other unemployed techs.  My view is only from the contracting side and they might not reflect the views of my company.
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 05:39 by biloxoi blues »

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   "Candidates must be active NRRPT certified or a very recent Hanford Returnee with updated Training records."

   Posts of this type are common.

   On the commercial nuclear power side, over half of outage RP Tech positions offer incentive pay for registry.





   
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 05:28 by wlrun3 »

Offline Already Gone

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I think a liberal arts degree is worthless in the RP field also ,except it does show people you have to know how to read and write , but Im pretty sure almost all will agree with that.  Who has an liberal arts degree?
I'm happy to see that you edited your post.
While a Liberal Arts degree is (for all practical purposes) worthless to the HP profession.  The attainment of one requires certain qualities that are desirable in a field which requires the ability to think.
For this reason, having a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree is one consideration in ranking qualifications.  In certain professions, a BS in any field is as good as an AS in the field in question.

But a degree isn't the same thing as a comprehensive examination at the technician level.
A BS in Health Physics might make you more qualified to write ALARA plans or RP procedures.  It should further one's qualifications toward porfessional level employment.  Technicain level employment requires a certain amount of training - some of it practical and some theoretical.  The achievement of this level of training is measured by the NRRPT Exam.  Any further theoretical education in the field is not useful at the technician level.

Let me stretch this example.  An MD would be the person you want to treat your ulcer.  But a Gastroenterologist is totally unqualified to splint, brace, and backboard you if you are injured in an auto accident.  EMT training is the appropriate level of training for this job.  If you are an EMT-P (what we call a Paramedic in New York) you are far more qualified to stabilize and transport to a trauma center someone who is bleeding heavily with compound fractures and tightness of the abdomen than Dr. Fitzglove, who fixed your sore belly.
However, a trauma surgeon takes over at that point.
Likewise, there is a certain level of training and experience that makes a technician better qualified than a Health Physicist to cover a valve breach.  There are distinctions, even in our field, between the technician and the professional.  There is such a thing as overqualified - which doesn't mean that you are more qualified than you need to be: it means being qualified for a different job altogether.
So, a degree isn't going to be worth more money for a technician in many cases.  However, I would consider it a major plus in hiring a tech if he or she were going to be doing higher-level work or supervising others.  And it would be almost a necessity in working at a professional level.  I would probably give it at least as much weight as NRRPT when hiring a tech.
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Tech A

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So are you saying your not a complete tech if you havent passed the NRRPT?  Short answer is appreciated

Offline hamsamich

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i think what he is saying is, if you were going to throw a dart at a board made with NRRPT techs and a board made with all other techs, the chance of a dart hitting a "good" tech might be higher for the NRRPT board.  I think he is probably right.

Tech A

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i think what he is saying is, if you were going to throw a dart at a board made with NRRPT techs and a board made with all other techs, the chance of a dart hitting a "good" tech might be higher for the NRRPT board.  I think he is probably right.   
Just a question on the NRRPT do they give out grades or do they just tell you pass or fail?  So passing the NRRPT makes a person a better tech and a degree in health physics doesnt.  Next thing will be hearing is how great navy nuke techs are.
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2007, 09:39 by Tech A »

RADBASTARD

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I think that some off your best techs came up through the ranks of deconners with no degee's.

Also I have seen people who has passed the NAACP and are navy super intellegent and book smart that couldn't Dose rate a bag of trash!

I got my training from salem and the road and ,I agree with biloxi blues we are the best unemployed techs that should be getting more money for doing all those Tech A jobs ,and those other techs making the same as us sitting control points or working the turbine and have nrrpt degrees or navy nukes.

I think the companies should keep track of the jobs of difficulty a tech does on a check list.
The more difficult the job ,the more you get paid over time so the slugs,nrrpt and navy nuke doesn't mean squat.
It's bassed on proformance.

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  Next thing will be hearing is how great navy nuke techs are.
best military teks i ebber worked wit ware army.   but dat wuz bac ina day of being ex-military compact reactor (mcr) tech.  butt de wuz serious nuke wonders.
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Offline hamsamich

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true true radbastard, but alot of those guys who came up thru the ranks got their NRRPT. those are the guys I'm talking about. anyway, I'm not saying there aren't alot of S-bag NRRPT guys, just on average if that is all you have to go by on a resume, then the NRRPT guy might be a better person to take a chance on. it's all probabilities, think about it rad-b. no one is saying you and yours aren't "the man". I know you guys are great, just, if you HAD to pick with just a resume.

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That is true the Army Techs were best!  I worked with one Group of techs.  About 10 were navy, 2 were army and the rest others.  The only people who were NRRPT were army.  Well one Operator found out who was prior army and always asked for the qualified techs who were NRRPT Army.  I finally asked him to stop dogging the navy guys because they could not take it any more with tears come out of their eyes, but you know what that did, it made it worst with more navy crying,  I even begged the navy guys to take the NRRPT but of couse the 3 that did failed and it just got worse!! LOL :P  When we took our Oral board we were not allowed to use calculators because they said the electro magnetic pulse would get them. so everything had to be figured by hand.  This helped me on the NRRPT, I was done in 45 minutes using army math, Most people took 3 to 4 hours on the test.  I think I used calculator on maybe 2 questions.
« Last Edit: Aug 08, 2007, 08:20 by thenukeman »

Offline hamsamich

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there is an army nuke-guy who works at IP.  I think he was one of the guys who almost lost a a nuclear barge when they were being towed for decom and had to be rescued near Wilmington nC.  nrrpt.

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...and they tech at Oak Ridge that gave his crew an Am/Pu uptake was Ex Army. It happend because, in his words, "nobody told me to look for alpha in the activation well."
The Navy and the NRRPT haven't cornered the market on incompetence.
It would be nice to see pay and/or bonuses tied to the degree of difficulty of the job. It kinda chaps my sit-down when I come out of a DW or a Cavity and walk by some NPU (non-productive unit) who's sitting at the PCM's telling people where to frisk, or pushing the button on the SAM and makes the same money I do (more if they're NRRPT).
« Last Edit: Aug 08, 2007, 10:21 by illegalsmile »

Offline Already Gone

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If you dig through my old posts (which you would only do if you had no life) you will find that I have been saying the same thing.  If there were some positive correlation between pay and the degree of difficulty of a job, things would be more fair.  There would also be an incentive to get qualified for those better-paying jobs.  As it stands, a lot of slugs think that there is no reason why they should be working under vessel or s/g's or refuel if they get the same cash for escorting laundry bags down the hall.  To be honest, there really isn't one.  Those who try for the harder jobs do it out of a sense of values that doesn't revolve around immediate monetary reward - although that set of values will invariably lead to long term gain. 
BTW, although I am an ex-navy tech., I don't automatically give them credit for being the best.  I have seen brilliance and utter stupidity coming from all quarters. 
This brings the discussion full-circle.  There is no reason to get NRRPT because the monetary incentive isn't worth the cost of the test, prep course, travel ... etc.  There should be an incentive.  Incentives work.  If you work for me, I'll expect a huge effort in return for the huge increase in pay.  If I can find those 10 techs who can do the work of 40, I'm going to hire the 10, pay them double, and leave the other 30 to work for my friend Eric over at Big Blue.  I'll still be able to save the customer the added cost of carrying a bunch of slugs and make a better profit.  If you think you are one of the 10, prove it.  Get a degree or NRRPT or OHST or at least show me that you can.  These things may not make yo a better tech., but at least they show that you have the initiative to improve.
But, if your idea of earning a paycheck is "do little, do less, and do like the other two", or "never sweat on their time, never s&!t on your time" there is nothing I can do to help you.
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Offline RDTroja

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...It would be nice to see pay and/or bonuses tied to the degree of difficulty of the job...

So during the day your pay would change based on what you were doing? If you are a containment tech but relieved the tech at the RCA exit running the SAM you would get less and if you covered a S/G jump your pay would go up? And when you are on your '2 out' from containment...? If you are an ALARA tech do you get more for running computer reports or hanging lead?

No thanks, there are enough bean counters out there already.

Pay should be based on what you are capable of, but there is no objective measurement for that and all of the slugs would just end up working for their friends... I am sure you see it all the time. The utilities don't want to get caught up in co-employment issues, so they are reluctant to do a lot of 'hand-picking' and a tiered system would be very hard to manage. Something objective like the NRRPT is at least something... again, no guarantees. Just like everything else.
« Last Edit: Aug 08, 2007, 12:01 by RDTroja »
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There is no reason to get NRRPT because the monetary incentive isn't worth the cost of the test, prep course, travel ... etc.  There should be an incentive.  Incentives work. 
Dang, BeerCourt, you're a harsh task master.  I originally took the NRRPT back in 1981 because the NRC was considering requiring credentials for the contractors (as part of the "new" 10CFR20 being considered back then).  It has opened doors (employment) that were otherwise closed (i.e., San Onofre back then), and has provided for a slight increase in pay rates and/or bonuses over the years.  However, I must agree . . . I have worked with NRRPT techs that could barely spell RO-2 and non-NRRPT techs that I would trust at my back blindly. 
Since I lost my "active" status, I've been studying to take the test again, but this is a matter of personal pride.  I don't expect it to help very much in today's climate out there on the road.  I do have to disagree on one point: The pay differential I've experienced has more than payed for the cost of the exam and my time spent studying for it.  In so far as costs are concerned, most house techs get reimbursed by their employers once they've successfully passed the exam (I've noticed this most places I've worked).
By the way, let me know when you're hiring.  I can still work four times harder than a slug but I'm down to only two times harder than the average tech (laughing).

Offline UncaBuffalo

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So during the day your pay would change based on what you were doing? If you are a containment tech but relieved the tech at the RCA exit running the SAM you would get less and if you covered a S/G jump your pay would go up? And when you are on your '2 out' from containment...? If you are an ALARA tech do you get more for running computer reports or hanging lead?

Actually, I'll do the FUN jobs (S/G, cavity, etc...) for free...as long as you pay me double-time for all the boring stuff (PCMs, ALARA, etc...)!  ;)

As far as NRRPT goes, I've seen from nothing to $3 per hour.  I'd be really happy if someone would give me the $5 per hour that BeerCourt mentioned.
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National Registration of Radiation Protection Technologists
Full Reimbursement of the exam fee if NRRPT exam is passed. Bartlett also offers 50% off textbooks and 25% off correspondence course by Dr. Dan Gollnick.



That is all very good but what about the time and expense of keeping it current?  Is there any reimburstment for that?  If there is, you may have swayed me. I would love to get some formal re-training, I have not had good HP training since 108 training 18 years ago.  I hate how rusty I am even on the stuff that we don't really use. I always do well on the NUF but really, that test is a joke compared to 108 certification and I am sure the same could be said for NRRPT.
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That is all very good but what about the time and expense of keeping it current?  Is there any reimburstment for that?  If there is, you may have swayed me. I would love to get some formal re-training, I have not had good HP training since 108 training 18 years ago.  I hate how rusty I am even on the stuff that we don't really use. I always do well on the NUF but really, that test is a joke compared to 108 certification and I am sure the same could be said for NRRPT.

Yearly sustaining fee is $35.

Registration Maintenance Program- http://www.nrrpt.org/documents/maintenance.pdf



Offline Melissa White

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If you're looking for pure monitary value of the NRRPT, it's worth a year of college.  How much does a year of college cost? 

It would be interesting to know how many NRRPT members used this asset to get their degree.

Anybody have any stats?

Melissa

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If you're looking for pure monitary value of the NRRPT, it's worth a year of college.  How much does a year of college cost? 

It would be interesting to know how many NRRPT members used this asset to get their degree.

Anybody have any stats?

Melissa


   "To date, approximately 150 Registered Radiation Protection Technologists have
obtained their BS degrees using this ACE recommendation."

                                                         NRRPT Newsletter, Fall 2006



wlrun3@aol.com

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That is all very good but what about the time and expense of keeping it current?  Is there any reimburstment for that?  If there is, you may have swayed me. I would love to get some formal re-training, I have not had good HP training since 108 training 18 years ago.  I hate how rusty I am even on the stuff that we don't really use. I always do well on the NUF but really, that test is a joke compared to 108 certification and I am sure the same could be said for NRRPT.


   "Some plants pay regular RP technicians a bonus for NRRPT registration and nearly all plants pay an additional $1-$2 per hour for contract RP technicians who are NRRPT registered."

    Basic Radiation Protection Technology, Dr. Daniel A. Gollnick
       4th Ed. (2000) p 718
       5th Ed. (2006) p 743





Offline RDTroja

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   "Some plants pay regular RP technicians a bonus for NRRPT registration and nearly all plants pay an additional $1-$2 per hour for contract RP technicians who are NRRPT registered."

    Basic Radiation Protection Technology, Dr. Daniel A. Gollnick
       4th Ed. (2000) p 718
       5th Ed. (2006) p 743

I guess not evrything published in Dr. Gollnick's books is 100% accurate...
« Last Edit: Aug 13, 2007, 11:58 by RDTroja »
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Offline Brett LaVigne

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Thanks for the info., I think that it is worth a second look.
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Quote from: wlrun3 on Yesterday at 10:31

   "Some plants pay regular RP technicians a bonus for NRRPT registration and nearly all plants pay an additional $1-$2 per hour for contract RP technicians who are NRRPT registered."

    Basic Radiation Protection Technology, Dr. Daniel A. Gollnick
       4th Ed. (2000) p 718
       5th Ed. (2006) p 743

I guess not everything published in Dr. Gollnick's books is 100% accurate...
 
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 10:58 by RDTroja » 
 


Roger, you are correct. I just talked to Eric Bartlett about this.

Only four of the twenty two fall 07 outages offer an NRRPT hourly wage rate increase.

Overall roughly 50% of plants/outages offer this incentive.

As an example, all fourteen of the Exelon plants/outages offer the increase for active registrants.


   Thankyou for preventing me from giving a false impression to the initial inquirer and the nukeworker forum in general.



Offline G-reg

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At those select locations which actually do give an NRRPT bonus:

Does the bonus usually apply only to Sr. HPs (or do the Jr. HPs with a successful NRRPT under their belt also get a little something extra in their paycheck at those locations)?
"But that's just my opinion - I could be wrong."
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Offline retired nuke

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At those select locations which actually do give an NRRPT bonus:

Does the bonus usually apply only to Sr. HPs (or do the Jr. HPs with a successful NRRPT under their belt also get a little something extra in their paycheck at those locations)?

from http://www.nrrpt.org/index.cfm/m/17/m/7

Experience
An applicant must have a minimum of five years experience. Training may be substituted for experience if the applicant will submit to the Board information about the program and proof of completion. This information should include curriculum, typical examinations, and passing requirements for radiation related subjects.

Experience credit allowed for formal education, company training programs and applicable military training is cummulative up to a maximum of two years. Note that an applicant may not claim work experience while in formal classroom study.


Kinda hard to meet the 5 year experience requirement and still be a junior....... ;)
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This brings the discussion full-circle.  There is no reason to get NRRPT because the monetary incentive isn't worth the cost of the test, prep course, travel ... etc.  

Didn't take a course, only traveled to the next plant up the road for the test, missed 1 day of outage work on test day, Bartlett reimbursed me the test cost. Been paid back 100 fold for the other expenses in pay increases, promotions, additional responsibilities, etc. Still maintained active (tho it's easier as a house tech, due to continuing training)'

Worth the effort   :)
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Offline UncaBuffalo

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Didn't take a course, only traveled to the next plant up the road for the test, missed 1 day of outage work on test day, Bartlett reimbursed me the test cost. Been paid back 100 fold for the other expenses in pay increases, promotions, additional responsibilities, etc. Still maintained active (tho it's easier as a house tech, due to continuing training)'

Worth the effort   :)

Right on, Housedad!  ABSOLUTELY worth the effort!

I've got the pay increases, interviews/jobs, etc, PLUS got 24 upper-division credits to finish my degree...which has given me MORE pay increases, interviews/jobs, etc...

:)
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I'm one of those 150, so I guess it was worth about $4-7k.

Almost every plant that pays an NRRPT premium for contract HP's will pay the same premium for having 7 years' experience.  Considering that you have to be a Senior HP for 5 years to take the test, all you need to do is wait 2 years.

Forget about taking the NRRPT for the money, take it because it is a credential that will open doors.  The money will follow.  Take it because it will cut at LEAST a year off getting a degree - not to mention the cost of 30 semester hours (24 upper level).  The money will follow.
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Offline grantime

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Some things can't always be measured as a return on cash investment.  Somethings are worth doing even without compensation.  I've never recieved a cent extra because I am NNRPT but I took it entirely for my own satisfaction.  Maybe not for everyone. 
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Offline G-reg

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from http://www.nrrpt.org/index.cfm/m/17/m/7

Experience
An applicant must have a minimum of five years experience. Training may be substituted for experience if the applicant will submit to the Board information about the program and proof of completion. This information should include curriculum, typical examinations, and passing requirements for radiation related subjects.

Experience credit allowed for formal education, company training programs and applicable military training is cummulative up to a maximum of two years. Note that an applicant may not claim work experience while in formal classroom study.


Kinda hard to meet the 5 year experience requirement and still be a junior....... ;)

Got it!  Here's a bit of an explanation for my rookie mistake.  I'm a 20-year Navy ELT (submarines) with two tender RadCon/RCSS tours, Plant Leading ELT at Prototype (635 in Charleston back in '99), two SSN LELT tours, three years as the Squadron Chem/RadCon guy, blah, blah, blah.  Anyway...

Reading post http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,4395.msg28914.html#msg28914, it looks like I could wiggle my tender RadCon, ELT, and time in the shipyards towards some serious SHP progression.  The money is obviously enticing, but I think it's probably not smart to skip straight to SHP for my first-ever outage.  I'm really good at Navy RadCon, but that + $3 will get me a cup of coffee when I'm driving around town outside the confines of the Navy base.

So I was thinkin' - which loosely translates into, "here is where I could probably use some fixin'":
I bone up for two months on the NRRPT, and take it in Feb 08.  (I'm kinda blessed in that I usually take written tests pretty well.  During oral exams, let's just say I won't be doing any Right Guard commercials...)  At this point I'd have to pay the exam's late-application fee, but c'est la vie.  Of course, this whole NRRPT exam for me is based on allowing my Navy "life experiences" to count toward the exam's prereqs - and I haven't seen anything yet which clearly tells me that that's OK, so this whole exam thing for me could be completely moot.  However, let's just say at this point that hypothetically I do take the NRRPT in Feb 08 (however hypothetical that may be).

Even if I do pass the NRRPT, and even if I do happen to squeeze into all the SHP prereqs, I'm thinking that I oughtta tackle my first-ever outage going in as Jr HP.  Maybe I'm crazy, or maybe I'm just plain dumb for thinking such thoughts, but here's how I look at the two entry-level options:
Jr HP. Compared to SHP I lose roughly $4K over the course of an outage (which ain't chump change), but I'm still payin' the bills and keepin' food on the table.  If I trip up a time or two on the civilian-side learning curve, I receive a few choice epithets & a roll of the eyes, I make a mental note regarding the f--- up, and I carry on smartly.  On the other hand, if I do reasonably well then maybe I get a couple people notice my name & face and say to themselves "he's OK" (which is important because paths seem to cross frequently).
SHP.  I put maybe 40 extra C-notes in the bank from the outage.  If I dork up a few things (or more than a few things) and do a sub-par SHP job right out of the starting blocks in front of God & country, then I'm toast; I'll be stuck deep in image rebuild/recovery mode for a pretty good stretch of time, which is not a fabulous way to be starting out one's career...

So with the Jr HP option, I loose a chunk of $$$ but should be able to manage to not lose face (and might even gain some good PR).  With SHP I bank some extra bills, but may have to lay low ("You want fries with that?") for a spell after that first initial job is done.

So unless a major epiphany strikes me and changes my mind, I'm going Jr HP for my first job.  And besides, it's my emphatic feeling that I oughtta have at least one "SHP U/I" before I actually take that job on fer chrissakes.  In fact, I'd like to do a Decon job even before going Jr HP, but I'm kinda worried that I could/would be "locked in" as a Decon guy after that.  I could imagine that after finishing Job #1 as a Deconner, any company getting my résumé for Job #2 would raise their eyebrows and say "You did Decon at your last job?  We need experienced Deconners for our outage."  (And thus commences an uphill battle...)  Maybe I'm wrong?

Anyway, coming full circle now and getting back to the NRRPT:

Even if I could/can satisfy all the prereqs for SHP, I plan on taking a Jr HP job (or two or three Jr jobs, depending on how hard it is for me to unlearn Navy RadCon).  So I was just wondering if I'd qualify for a NRRPT bonus as a Jr HP during the first job/jobs (or if I would have to wait until I actually took on the role of SHP).  Regardless of whether I get credit or not as a Jr, I'm still planning on taking the NRRPT this time around; even if it turns out that it isn't a pay-raiser for Jr HP, it can still be a door-opener.

Sorry this post is so long – hopefully it wasn't too painful to read...
« Last Edit: Dec 17, 2007, 02:24 by G-reg »
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Offline Already Gone

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Yeah, the post was long, but it sums up your misconceptions totally.  You are crazy.  You are miles ahead of a lot of Senior HP's.  When I got out of the Navy, I only had 8 years in, was a Sub ELT/LELT the whole time with a ton of shipyard experience.  I was discharged on Friday, and working as a SHP on Monday.  I had to help some of the other Senior Techs pass the exam.  They had been Senior HP's for years.

The only qualification to be a "Senior" HP is 3000 or 6000 hours as a tech and the ability to pass a fundamentals exam every few years or so.  Most people spend those hours sitting at control points or changing out the bags of laundry and trash at the Step-off-pads.  Many SHP's sweat that exam every time they take it - you have no need to sweat it.

If you are NRRPT, (and not every Navy Nuke qualifies ...I didn't ... right out of the Navy) you are more than qualified to be a Senior HP.

This is NOT going to be your choice.  Chances are that someone looking to fill a Sr. HP slot (and probably billing someone else at the appropriate rate) is not going to cater to your insecurity and hire you at a lower grade unless they are staffing a job that is full and looking to get you cheap.  They are going to want you to fill the job that you are qualified for, even if they pay you less than you are worth.  My daughter is qualified as a Junior HP.  She has never seen a nuke plant, does not know what a microcurie is, and wouldn't know which end of a meter to point at the source.  She is still as qualified to be  JHP as she needs to be.  You didn't do all you have done, and pass the NRRPT to compete with Candace the Hooters Girl for a job.

A bit of advice from a brother nuke:  NEVER sell yourself short.  Nobody wants someone who is overqualified.  There is such a thing, and for good reason.  You have untapped ability that goes waaaaay beyond Senior HP quals.  SHP should be the LOWEST starting point that you should consider.

Now, I know that I have verbally slapped a bunch of Navy nukes here for expecting to come out and start at the top - ahead of people who have years more experience and higher quals - but, you shouldn't sell yourself short either.  SHP is no big deal.
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Offline Rennhack

Even if I do pass the NRRPT, and even if I do happen to squeeze into all the SHP prereqs, I'm thinking that I oughtta tackle my first-ever outage going in as Jr HP.  Maybe I'm crazy, or maybe I'm just plain dumb for thinking such thoughts

I don't know how familiar you are with Troy, but he is always right (literally).

Don't sell your self short.  Take the highest paying job you can get.  When youy get hired as a Sr HP, just ask thousands of questions.  They don't expect you to know everything already, they just expect youy to ask enought questions to do the job they ask you to do.  Be upfront, and let them know you are not familiar with their power plant, and need some peer coaching.

Everything will be just fine, and you'll become a gold member with some of that extra cash from being a Sr HP.

Offline G-reg

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Thanks - I really appreciate the feedback & info!  My number one concern (or insecurity, if you will) was walking into my first job, not meeting the bar, and then consequently discovering that my first job was also my last.  So, thank you for pointing out where that bar really is.  As long as new-guy questions aren't frowned upon (within obvious reason, of course), then I'm in!

BTW, I did sign up for Gold Member.  The way I figure, this site just helped me avoid walking into a mistake (of my own making) which would have cost me the same $$$ as approximately 100 years of Gold membership.  (Don'cha have a Lifetime Membership option?)  ;D

I am still wondering one thing about the NRRPT:  In the past, has anybody ever been allowed to take the exam straight out of the canoe club?  Or do you have to put in time on the commercial/DOE side first?

Thanks again for the advice/info!
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Offline hamsamich

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I don't have near the experience (7 yr ELT/RCSS) you do and i did my first one as an SHP.  I was fine.  People will try to make you feel like you don't know what you are doing at times (someone tried to give me crap my first outage because I didn't know how to use or even know what a "power visor" was), but your navy training is excellent, and 95% of the time it will make you fail conservative.  I had worked in Commercial plants though, just not as an HP, so that helped.  But I had also not done HP stuff since 1995 and I started doing outages in 2005, so that was a plus and a minus.  Have confidence, listen to the others and temper that with your excellent experience and training; you will be fine.  If you don't know what a power visor is, ask.  If you don't know what an RM14 is, then you are in trouble, get it?  Don't expect to see an ANPDR27, do you guys still use those?   :D

Offline Rennhack

BTW, I did sign up for Gold Member.  The way I figure, this site just helped me avoid walking into a mistake (of my own making) which would have cost me the same $$$ as approximately 100 years of Gold membership.  (Don'cha have a Lifetime Membership option?)  ;D

I am still wondering one thing about the NRRPT:  In the past, has anybody ever been allowed to take the exam straight out of the canoe club?  Or do you have to put in time on the commercial/DOE side first?

Thanks for the donation.  I can't answer the NRRPT question, but I'll try to get someone from the NRRPT board to respond.

Joe Ferguson

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I know I'm repeating myself, but it has been a while.
The most I ever got for NRRPT was $1/hr.  I would have gotten the same $1/hr anyway because I had been a Sr. HP for greater than 7 years.
Since it costs money to maintain your NRRPT registration (Dues, memberships to HP Society or ANS, CEU's) and I never missed a job for not being current, and I got the same money as a current NRRPT tech, and some sites don't care if you are current as long as you have the certificate, I let it lapse 13 years ago.  As far as I'm concerned it is worthless - monetarily.  However, I am speaking as an employee.
Speaking as an employer, I wouldn't hire an HP who didn't have it or couldn't get it.  That changes things considerably.
In my opinion, it is worth at least $5/hr above any other tech on your list - including the ones who have 7+ years of experience.  So, if you are paying an additional $1/hr for 7 year Seniors, you should be paying at least $6/hr more for NRRPT with 7 years.  No NRRPT registered tech should be getting less than $30/hr.

I guess I don't agree here BeerCourt.  As an 'employer', you say you wouldn't hire a tech without it?  If you are the 'employer', you are going to have to consider many other factors when staffing up including budget and possible litigation issues.  We both know that we would cringe at paying a tech $30.00 /hr to watch a monitor because they don't have the skills (or competency) to cover the higher risk work such as S/G's , UV, or any real LHRA stuff, right?  There out there man, we just hate to admit it.  We say stuff like......"Oh, these monitors and this Exit Point is very important because it is our last line of defense and I'm glad you are here to help us".  Truth is..............that person is not going in my plant and sure as hell isn't going to cover any HRA/LHRA work.  It sucks, but it happens every day and we all know at least one technician that fits this bill.  
I'm just against paying a person $30/hr because he/she has a piece of paper and then HAVING to paying LESS $$$$$ to the tech who is in the field, in the worst radiological conditions, saving lives, mitigating OPEX Events, and doing what's right.  

In my opinion, the 'registry' is over-done.  I don't believe that having a NRRPT wall plate will make you a better technician, a better supervisor, or a better manager.  In most cases, those with the NRRPT Cert are great techs - but not all and not enough to make monitary policy changes.
We need another way of recognizing and rewarding the tech's that do make a difference.  I am all-in for that.  

If it wasn't obvious by now.....................I don't have a NRRPT Cert myself.  I was never really interested in chasing it down when I was younger (as it is a little harder to get when you are on the road) and by now, some 25 years later...............I still don't see the point or the benefit in my particular case.  If I see it on someones resume, thats okay because it is another way of showing or saying "I care".  However, that candidate will need to bring alot more to the table to get the 'knod' and the offer than a membership card.

rotag

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Read more closely.  You missed the "...or couldn't get it"  The ability is more valuable to me than the certificate.  I let mine lapse almost a decade ago.  I got it, that's all that matters to me.  I got the 30 semester hours, that is all the monetary benefit that I wanted from it.  I'm not willing to pay $6.00 an hour to someone I don't trust, let alone $30.  I use the word "should" a lot in that post.  A lot of things "should" be different.  A tech "should" be worth what his qualifications say he is worth.  NRRPT certificates only mean that you passed a test once upon a time.  What they "should" mean is that you were vetted by the qualification process before you ever sat for the test.  Unfortunately, lots of power plants are very proud of those plaques with the names of all their NRRPT technicians on them.  They want them to be full of names.  So, when it comes time to sign a recommendation, they sign as many as they can instead of asking whether the tech was really qualified.  What you end up with is a bunch of technicians who are qualified "on paper" to take the exam, who took a prep course (which is a virtual guarantee of passing the exam) from someone on the board of examiners, and passed the test.

If you have 5 years as a Sr. HP and you can't get the NRRPT, considering how low the bar is for getting it, you shouldn't be working as an HP.  Now, if paying for the course and the exam fees are an issue, that is not an indication that you lack ability; it is an indication that you are not a house tech who can get the employer to pay the way.  Unless you are going to need the college credits for a degree, taking the NRRPT on your own dime makes no financial sense whatsoever.  By the time you pay for the exam, and the prep course, and the study materials, you won't work enough hours in those two years to do better than break even.  At $1/hr times two years at 25 weeks a year at 72 hours a week, you end up with 4400 dollars.  That assumes that every job will pay the $1 bonus, and that you are not otherwise qualified for that bonus.  It assumes that you get 72 hours every week, and that you actually work 25 weeks in both years.  It assumes that you take the exam at exactly the 5 year point and get your results almost immediately.  If you are a full-timer at 40 hours a week, it comes out to the same amount.  Once you hit your 7 year point it becomes moot because those utilities pay you the $1/hr anyway.

Of course, the fees for the exam and membership are tax deductible to the extent that they exceed 2% of your AGI.  If you are tracking your expenses properly, you should be able to deduct at least some of the cost.  And, if passing the NRRPT is a condition of getting a promotion or a real pay raise (not the roadie $1 bonus) I say do it if you can.

The original question is how much is it worth in dollars to be an NRRPT.  The answer is : It depends.  If you are looking to get a job that requires it, it is worth tens of thousands of dollars.  If you are working as a roadie, it ain't worth a bucket of cold spit.  If you are a house mouse, who cares??? It won't cost you anything anyway so take it!!
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Offline Rennhack

I am still wondering one thing about the NRRPT:  In the past, has anybody ever been allowed to take the exam straight out of the canoe club?  Or do you have to put in time on the commercial/DOE side first?

I talked to a friend of mine that is on the NRRPT board, and his responce was:
Quote
Yes, he should qualify easily, however, he must complete the application to be officially evaluated.

Offline RDTroja

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Here is my experience with the NRRPT. I took it in 1991 at the plant where I was employed (I was a 'house' instructor) and since I was working for the utility, they paid for it ($125, I think.) The reason I took it was to 1) see if I could pass it and 2) stop having to answer the question people were constantly asking (Why aren't you NRRPT certified?). Also 3) the test was being given 10 minutes from my house and 4) I was the designated escort for the test proctor.

The cost to me was $0. I then got out of the HP field (mostly, at least) and didn't swing a meter again for about 11 years. When I went back on the road, I got $2/hr ($3 on overtime) at the Excelon sites I just happened to work in. Even if I had to pay the original fee of $125 and another $100 or so to travel and take the test, I would have far more than made up for that on my first outage. So I was already ahead of the game after one outage.

I disagree that anyone with 5 years should be able to pass the test (unless they have really changed it since 1991) because most of the contractors just don't get the theory training that the test requires. There is not a lot of  'practical' stuff on the test, there is (or was) a lot of theory. Maybe the house techs have the training, but the contractors do not. I have also not personally worked in a lot of plants that pay more for a 7-year senior than any other senior. With the number of years I have, I would love to see a progressive scale, but I have not seen any of it... maybe it is just the plants I have worked.

There are plants that require their technicians to be able to pass the test after a certain number of years, or they can be terminated. I do not know how many there are, but there is at least one.... I taught there.

The bottom line (for me) is that I took the test as a personal challenge and it paid me back far more than it would have cost me if I had paid for it myself. If you have a decent theory background and can take tests (an art form in itself) you will pass and it can pay you back whatever it costs you. There is no reason not to take it IMHO, and it just may get you something might not otherwise be available to you.
« Last Edit: Dec 17, 2007, 03:10 by RDTroja »
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Offline G-reg

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If you don't know what an RM14 is, then you are in trouble, get it?  Don't expect to see an ANPDR27, do you guys still use those?   :D

I've never personally held an RM-14, but I saw the picture in the "Meters" quiz on this website; I was kind of surprised by how technologically advanced most of the meters weren't...  What do they do, paint 'em a different color and call them "the next generation"?   :)

The AN/PDR-27's have all been phased out, as have been all of the AN/PDR-45's.  We've got a new toy to play with, the "Multi-Function Radiac (MFR)".  I didn't see a picture of it in the "Meters" quiz, so I'll post a couple photos of one when I get the chance.  We call them AN/PDQ-1's.  You can hook up a gamma rad probe to it, and PRESTO it becomes an AN/PDQ-3.  Or you can hook up a frisker probe to it instead, and then it becomes an AN/PDQ-4.  Big Navy just started issuing out the alpha probes for it (AN/PDQ-5 in that configuration), so the old AN/PDR-56's are going away also.  Next to hit the streets will be a shielded/directional probe, at which point the AN/PDR-66's will be gone, too.  Rumor has it that they're trying to come up with a neutron probe also (but getting their butts kicked by it) so they can eventually get rid of AN/PDR-70's too.  The MFR's have a digit display which will automatically change to display the correct units depending on which type of probe you've got plugged in at the time.  So far they're rugged enough, but the readings are really drifty - sometimes you can hold the probe perfectly still and watch the reading jump up and down by 50% (sometimes even more).

All in all, they're not too bad, and I was kind of surprised that the "Meters" quiz had mostly analog displays and X1/X10/X100 switches.  Are you guys using newfangled digital auto-ranging radiacs much over on your side of the fence?

(P.S.  Yes, this is off-topic...)
« Last Edit: Dec 17, 2007, 05:12 by G-reg »
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Offline G-reg

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I talked to a friend of mine that is on the NRRPT board, and his responce was:
Yes, he should qualify easily, however, he must complete the application to be officially evaluated.

YESSSSSS!!!

Thanks, man!
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Offline Already Gone

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I abhor digital meters in the field.  I don't have time to mentally process numbers when I am approaching a screaming hot valve, or if the rates change suddenly.  I want the meter on the range that was selected  by me and only me, and I want to see needle deflection.  Math is for later when you are writing up the survey.
Sounds to me like  you have a version of the Eberline ESP series meter.  Very versatile, but hard to manipulate the buttons with gloves on.

BTW, here's your first lesson in civilian nuke :  We never use the word radiac.  Radiac is a smelly decon solution used for cleaning tools.  I don't even know if they make it any more.  Everything here is a meter.  Very few places (TMI and Oyster Creek are the only ones I know) other than Navy and DOE use the term RadCon either.  RadCon is a smelly foam used for deconning people.  It resembles shaving cream.  We say RadPro, Radiation Protection, Health Physics, HP, RP, and sometimes Rad Safety.
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Offline Already Gone

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Here is my experience with the NRRPT. I took it in 1991 at the plant where I was employed (I was a 'house' instructor) and since I was working for the utility, they paid for it ($125, I think.) The reason I took it was to 1) see if I could pass it and 2) stop having to answer the question people were constantly asking (Why aren't you NRRPT certified?). Also 3) the test was being given 10 minutes from my house and 4) I was the designated escort for the test proctor.

The cost to me was $0. I then got out of the HP field (mostly, at least) and didn't swing a meter again for about 11 years. When I went back on the road, I got $2/hr ($3 on overtime) at the Excelon sites I just happened to work in. Even if I had to pay the original fee of $125 and another $100 or so to travel and take the test, I would have far more than made up for that on my first outage. So I was already ahead of the game after one outage.

I disagree that anyone with 5 years should be able to pass the test (unless they have really changed it since 1991) because most of the contractors just don't get the theory training that the test requires. There is not a lot of  'practical' stuff on the test, there is (or was) a lot of theory. Maybe the house techs have the training, but the contractors do not. I have also not personally worked in a lot of plants that pay more for a 7-year senior than any other senior. With the number of years I have, I would love to see a progressive scale, but I have not seen any of it... maybe it is just the plants I have worked.

There are plants that require their technicians to be able to pass the test after a certain number of years, or they can be terminated. I do not know how many there are, but there is at least one.... I taught there.

The bottom line (for me) is that I took the test as a personal challenge and it paid me back far more than it would have cost me if I had paid for it myself. If you have a decent theory background and can take tests (an art form in itself) you will pass and it can pay you back whatever it costs you. There is no reason not to take it IMHO, and it just may get you something might not otherwise be available to you.

If you didn't have to pay for the prep course, you got off cheap.  Frankly, I can't understand anybody passing this test without the prep course or a lot of studying stuff that they never see or do.  Conversely, I can't see anyone who has taken the good prep course not passing it. 

Anyway, my position is that there are lots of reasons to take the exam, and lots of ways to pay for it, but paying the whole cost yourself just to get a pay raise is not a good investment.  You either have to get someone else to pay for it, or get something else out of it.
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Offline RDTroja

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If you didn't have to pay for the prep course, you got off cheap.  Frankly, I can't understand anybody passing this test without the prep course or a lot of studying stuff that they never see or do.  Conversely, I can't see anyone who has taken the good prep course not passing it. 

Anyway, my position is that there are lots of reasons to take the exam, and lots of ways to pay for it, but paying the whole cost yourself just to get a pay raise is not a good investment.  You either have to get someone else to pay for it, or get something else out of it.

I didn't pay for the prep course because I didn't take it... I also didn't study for it. (Yes, I know. I almost backed out of taking the test, but took it anyway.) I didn't take the test for more money but it did work out that way. Guess its just another way I fall out of the norm.
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I have seen an increase in both hourly rate and the bonus for being NRRPT.

I took the exam because I wanted to see how I faired against what I thought was an industry standard at the time.  I alos used it as a tool to focus on my weak points (yeah and I still have many).

Funny thing about the exam I took... all my calculations but one were Co60 navy thumbrule verifiable. 

Ill maintain my Nrrpt and continue towards a degree and CHP cert...then get outta the business.  I think Im gonna statr cooking again.

Good luck to all that want to take the exam.

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If you're looking for pure monitary value of the NRRPT, it's worth a year of college.  How much does a year of college cost? 

It would be interesting to know how many NRRPT members used this asset to get their degree.

Anybody have any stats?

Melissa

Excelsior College will give you the same 30 semester hours for completing the RP training program at a US nuclear plant.   They will even give you more of them as upper level credits than they do for NRRPT. 
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Offline Already Gone

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I have seen an increase in both hourly rate and the bonus for being NRRPT.

I took the exam because I wanted to see how I faired against what I thought was an industry standard at the time.  I alos used it as a tool to focus on my weak points (yeah and I still have many).

Funny thing about the exam I took... all my calculations but one were Co60 navy thumbrule verifiable. 

Ill maintain my Nrrpt and continue towards a degree and CHP cert...then get outta the business.  I think Im gonna statr cooking again.

Good luck to all that want to take the exam.

I have nuked out those thumbrules many times and found them to be really accurate except for the most common one - the curie/meter/rem rule is off by a bunch if Co-60 is the only nuclide. They should call it the curie/meter/2rem rule.
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LaFeet

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Yeah  I notice that too some years back.

Offline UncaBuffalo

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I have seen an increase in both hourly rate and the bonus for being NRRPT.

I've noticed that, too.  Both outages I'm going to this fall are paying $2/hour extra for NRRPT...but only if you are 'active'.  That's the first time anyone's ever even asked if I was 'active'.  I'd paid my dues & kept my training up-to-date for the past umpteen years, so kind of nice to be getting a little something for it...
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Offline RDTroja

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I've noticed that, too.  Both outages I'm going to this fall are paying $2/hour extra for NRRPT...but only if you are 'active'.  That's the first time anyone's ever even asked if I was 'active'.  I'd paid my dues & kept my training up-to-date for the past umpteen years, so kind of nice to be getting a little something for it...

Exelon has always made the bonus for 'active' NRRPT... I found that out through a lot of confusion. No one had asked me if I was active, just if I had passed the test. When the money didn't show up for three paychecks in a row after promises to fix the problem, someone stumbled on the real reason... I was not active. $100 later, I was active again and got the $2/hr... a good trade.
"I won't eat anything that has intelligent life, but I'd gladly eat a network executive or a politician."

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Offline Laundry Man

Beer Court,
The term Radiac is used at Oyster.  It refers to the instrument group or lack there of.
LM

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Exelon has always made the bonus for 'active' NRRPT... I found that out through a lot of confusion. No one had asked me if I was active, just if I had passed the test. When the money didn't show up for three paychecks in a row after promises to fix the problem, someone stumbled on the real reason... I was not active. $100 later, I was active again and got the $2/hr... a good trade.

   ...active membership can be readily verified on the website...


Offline Already Gone

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Beer Court,
The term Radiac is used at Oyster.  It refers to the instrument group or lack there of.
LM

There you go -- the exception that proves the rule.  Oyster does everything else the stone-age way, why not this too?  Is the RadCon office still in that old garage?
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Offline Laundry Man

Sadly the Radcon Office is still in the "temporary" building on the north side of the plant.  Plans are to build a permanent building on the north side to one day hold RP and craft.  Hope they get relicensed so this dream comes true.
LM

exocom

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  I have seen House techs that were spoon fed prep courses, given at least 40 hours of paid self study time on top of being paid for taking the prep course and still failed the NRRPT.  I am sure some of these people were playing games, but then again there were several of these people that could not pass the test after being registered was changed from an "Oh that's nice" to an expectation on their performance reviews.

exocom

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  I first took the test in 1995 at the insistence of a house supervisor.   At that time the utility was seriously considering not hiring contract RPs that did not have the NRRPT.  Passing the test gave me a $1.50/hour raise at some sites; $1.00/hour at others and nothing at still other sites.  I got out of the field in 2002 and came due in the time I was out.  Came back in 2005, took the test again in 2006 and received a $1.25/hour raise.  I figure the value of the NRRPT to me at $16,000 over ten years.

Cathy

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I just recently passed the NRRPT (2-28-09) and honestly it was the most difficult test I have taken in years, I was truly surprised. The company I work for paid for the test (250, but only if you pass, you fail, your loss) and sent me to a prep course on site several months prior. I can say for me personally that the prep course had little value for me. As far as monetary value, the NRRPT is worth about 1400 to 1500 a year in additional pay at my plant.

stownsend

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I think that some off your best techs came up through the ranks of deconners with no degee's.

Also I have seen people who has passed the NAACP and are navy super intellegent and book smart that couldn't Dose rate a bag of trash!

What type of questions are on the NAACP exam? :P

 


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