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JassenB

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Re: practical hints
« Reply #25 on: May 21, 2005, 02:07 »
WD40 is great for removing tape residue.




I have also found WD40 to be the most useful thing for removing any kind of grease or oil from dirty hands.

Offline SloGlo

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Re: practical hints
« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2005, 02:58 »
Another practical hint that really works:

When at a control point or on a Rad Coverage Job and a Overseer (Manager, INPO, NRC, etc.) comes by asking questions.

1. Begin reeling off all dose rates, contamination levels, job history, heat stress concerns, etc. etc. etc. that you can come up with.

The human brain can only remember 4 to 5 things at a time (7 if you're good). So the Overseer eyes will begin to glaze over after a few minutes and he will wander off not remembering any particular thing except a vague recollection that the Tech on the job has everything covered.
This really works, try it. You will be amazed how easy it is to get these people to wander off and go bug somebody else.

knot two rein awn dis pairaide, but yinz gotta watch out fer peeple that take notes, 'cause iffen yer off by a significant amount yule phind yerself playing "tech a".
quando omni flunkus moritati

dubble eye, dubble yew, dubble aye!

dew the best ya kin, wit watt ya have, ware yinze are!

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: practical hints
« Reply #27 on: Jul 08, 2005, 06:37 »
For instance, I have found that when setting up rad barrier rope that may be expanded or shrunk repeatedly for storage of RAM, a knot called the tauntline knot is invaluable.  This knot will stay where you place it and yet can be slipped along the rope run easily to shorten or lenghten the distance of a boundary.  

Another good knot to know is a 'self-cinching' bow knot...this will keep your modesty garments from falling down under your PCs...

Same basic knot as you use to tie your shoes (I got it out of a knot book that recommends it for that purpose), except, with the basic knot, the process is :

1. Tie the laces together.
2. Make a loop out of one lace.
3. Wrap the other lace around the loop and tuck this lace back thru the wrap you just made.

(Look familiar?  Hard to put in words what I do without thinking...)

Anyway, the 'self-cinching' version is the same EXCEPT :

3. Wrap the other lace around the loop TWICE and tuck this lace back thru the WRAPS you just made.

Give this a try (on your shoes OR modesties) and let me know if I made the instructions clear enough to follow.



PS.  Hey SloGlo...how do I make a tautline hitch?  I used to know, but lost my book.  :/
« Last Edit: Jul 08, 2005, 06:45 by UncaBuffalo »
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline SloGlo

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Re: practical hints
« Reply #28 on: Jul 09, 2005, 01:07 »
Another good knot to know is a 'self-cinching' bow knot...this will keep your modesty garments from falling down under your PCs...

PS.  Hey SloGlo...how do I make a tautline hitch?  I used to know, but lost my book.  :/

self cinching bow knot.. wotta great name for a boot knot!  that's what they called it in boy scouts, anyway.

tauntline hitch is basically two pairs of half hitches, tied opposite each other.  it creates a sliding knot that will never loosen unless untied.  the best thing to do is look it up.

http://www.realknots.com/links/T.htm

i put a second half hitch on the outer part of the knot, as it keeps everything tidy.
« Last Edit: Jul 09, 2005, 01:10 by SloGlo »
quando omni flunkus moritati

dubble eye, dubble yew, dubble aye!

dew the best ya kin, wit watt ya have, ware yinze are!

atomicarcheologist

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Re: practical hints
« Reply #29 on: Jan 10, 2006, 03:57 »
For those who do Field Work, there is quick and easy Standard to Metric conversion.  Simply convert your feet to inches and divide by 40 and you will have meters.  Run it backwards to get feet from meters.  I know there is an error factor in here, so it shouldn't be used for large areas.  However, if you are on a site that big, go buy a metric tapemeasure.  This works excellent inside buildings especially doing rooms as you will notice that the converted metric measurements break pretty evenly on the structure such as at walls, ceilings, etc.

 


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