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What is your preference for on the Road Living

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Author Topic: RV Living on the Road  (Read 31539 times)

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ex-turbine_cowboy

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RV Living on the Road
« on: Jan 26, 2004, 09:22 »
Used to be that the way to live during short outages was in an RV.  How is it today?

wondertech

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #1 on: Jan 26, 2004, 12:55 »
For a three week wonder an apartment is out of the question. An RV site will run about half of what a hotel room will cost you and I get to sleep in my own bed every night. My only complaint is that I worked on the road for five years before I figured it out.

Offline Phurst

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #2 on: Jan 26, 2004, 12:59 »
I spent a year traveling the US in a class 'C'. The biggest problem was towing a vehicle. If I did it again, or could afford it, a fifth wheel would be my preference.
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oldtimer

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #3 on: Jan 26, 2004, 01:07 »
 I have a 30' 5th wheel. Most I have paid is $ 10.00 a day. Works for me.

Doc_REM

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #4 on: Jan 26, 2004, 05:44 »
Hotel...Motel...In the car...a park bench!!! The outages are so short, who needs anything else?
But, now I have a long term DOE job...Apartment and I kind of grt to sleep in my own bed 8)

Offline retired nuke

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #5 on: Jan 26, 2004, 09:11 »
We have some people up here at VY that are having a bit of trouble with frozen pipes etc. RV living might be nice down south, but even if your unit doesn't freeze up, very few places are open up here off-season.
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ex-turbine_cowboy

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #6 on: Jan 27, 2004, 06:12 »
They come with enclosed underbellys and heated tanks now.  If you are going to work the cold season, I imagine most will look ahead for their location.
« Last Edit: Jan 27, 2004, 06:13 by turbine cowboy »

harleygirl

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #7 on: Jan 28, 2004, 03:36 »
I traveled with a 5th wheel. Home was where ever you parked it. Bed was always the same and your stress relief place never changed, just the scenery out the window.  :)

Daily driving vehicle detached.  ;D

Haven't been to any outages where you couldn't find a place to park one even, in the cold weather climates. Get one that is winterized. We had enclosed underbelly, heated tanks and when in extreme cold i.e. Minnesota just use insulation board to close off underneath and place small electric heater under there and that solved the frozen dump pipes. ;)

If you left it stocked with a supply of clothes and all other living needs then you could hook up and go with a short report notice, only needing to get groceries.  ;D

If it is kept under 30 ft there should never be a parking restriction either at all campgrounds. It really made the road life much easier, I recommend it for anyone traveling the outages nowadays. I sure miss that cozy little home away from home. :(

ex-turbine_cowboy

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #8 on: Jan 29, 2004, 09:19 »

If it is kept under 30 ft there should never be a parking restriction either at all campgrounds. It really made the road life much easier, I recommend it for anyone traveling the outages nowadays. I sure miss that cozy little home away from home. :(
Well said Harley Girl,  I can probably help you get that cozy home back again :) ;D

Have you all listed your favorite camp sites on the lodging page for this forum?

The only one I stayed at was the militaary camp ground at Grand Gulf.  It is located about 400yards past the main entrance to the site on a civil war battle field.  A tent was 2 dollars a night and they had trailer accomedations.

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #9 on: Jan 29, 2004, 10:04 »
I've only had one, a 70's era 32' Hitchhiker.  I had it my first winter at Callaway while home was still 70 some miles away.  It was nice to have it to go on those winter nights after a double.  I'll have one again.  It'll make a nice retirement, catch an outage every now & then, home away from home.
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ex-turbine_cowboy

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #10 on: Feb 02, 2004, 03:10 »
Are There no other, RV'ers out there.  Is 11 the only amount.  I can't believe that all of you Roadies live in apartments and throw away security deposits every three weeks. You guys that do the tent thing should upgrade to a Travel Trailer or at least a Pop UP.  Where are your favorite sites to make a temporary home at?

jowlman

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #11 on: Feb 04, 2004, 05:24 »
After over 15 years on the road I finally broke down and bought myself a 30' 5th wheel. Used it for the first time the last outage at Grand Gulf. I was at the end of the access road paying $80/wk. People without were staying 20 mi away in Vicksburg and paying from what I heard was over $200/wk, it made good sense to me. I have found that I can stay at Susquehanna cheaper out of the camper than in it. Other than that, I keep it fully stocked so I can leave on short notice, I enjoy the experience very much and only wish I'd done it alot sooner.

moke

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #12 on: Feb 04, 2004, 12:58 »
I was once on the Bandwagon with the RV concept yet a veteran mentioned that I had better have a strong, strong relationship with my spouse since prolonged living within a motor home or camper is not as simple as one may think.

I know many of you have endured this way of llife and would like to hear how you get by?

Thank you in advance.

Moke

Offline dosetek

Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #13 on: Feb 04, 2004, 01:35 »
New 2003 35 ft 5th. with 3 slides. You have to have the slide out rooms, did the 30ft tag along without any slide outs (not enough room for 2 people if you like having your space) :'(.  We even went this time with the big boy refrigerator, 4 doors, found you spent too much time rearranging stuff with the standard size :P. Great during time off in the winter or summer for that matter. Just hook up your extra home and go wherever you want. Your home, your stuff, only your dirt-cant beat it.  8) 8)

moke

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #14 on: Feb 04, 2004, 02:52 »
Dosetek,

Sounds like you are living large. I hope to get one when it's time to head to Yuma, AZ!

Awesome!

Moke

Offline Nuclear NASCAR

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #15 on: Feb 04, 2004, 11:01 »
New 2003 35 ft 5th. with 3 slides. You have to have the slide out rooms, did the 30ft tag along without any slide outs (not enough room for 2 people if you like having your space) :'(.  We even went this time with the big boy refrigerator, 4 doors, found you spent too much time rearranging stuff with the standard size :P. Great during time off in the winter or summer for that matter. Just hook up your extra home and go wherever you want. Your home, your stuff, only your dirt-cant beat it.  8) 8)

Dan,
My old one didn't have the slideouts.  Some friends have a 35 foot King of the Road with a big slideout that I've been lusting after.  If someone wants to pick up a nice camper at Callaway this spring they can get a nice one there.  (Since I can't afford to get it at this time  :'( )

The next one will definitely have at least one slideout. 
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Offline darkmatter

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #16 on: Feb 05, 2004, 02:37 »
I've used a 20' travel trailer for over 10 years, ( bought it used then) and left the ratwife and kids at home. With the shorter outages, you gotta do what you gotta do. I keep it loaded with the outrage clothes and supplies. I've learned over the years to use PVC piping (cut to size each time) for the septic drain rather then the cheap blue accordien tubing. I used heat tape on the water hose with that foam tubing rather then fiberglass fluff and wrap. Foam rubber panels cut to size for the windows with plastic for the winter and rock-salt as a cheap way to keep the drains flowing in the winter. Beadboard panels cut for a skirt also. I look for a shady spot for summer time. A plus is two trees nearby close enough to string a hammock. I never bothered with satellite TV cause with long hours, who has time. DVDs are nice though, entertainment on demand. The new technology of cell phones has been a real benefit over trying to hook up a wire line each outage and the hassle with local bells. If the outrage is going to last more then a month, I've found mobile-home parks (utilities separate) cheaper then the convience of an RV park.

Gotta have Duct Tape, silicone rubber, hand saw, hand shovel and contact cement. Trust me.
« Last Edit: Feb 05, 2004, 02:47 by darkmatter »
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duke99301

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #17 on: Feb 05, 2004, 10:03 »
I have a 35 foot southwind and I pull the jeep behind it. yes the floors get cold in the winter but crank the heat and the Dog loves the couch he can see right out the windows and make sure the evil cats and deer stay away. :P

ex-turbine_cowboy

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #18 on: Feb 05, 2004, 10:07 »
For you all looking for great deals and service on RV's, I am in the Cincinnati area.  Email me for info.  I sell Fleetwoods, Winnibagos, and most of the Thor industries lines, to name a few.  Our new facility in Fairfield will have over 300 new and used units.  Our Facility in Richmond Indiana has over 1000 units.

radrat

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #19 on: Feb 13, 2004, 01:22 »
I spent the winter up in Maine in our 5th wheel and well it was my first time so I didnt know what to expect . It was very cold last year there but we did just fine (I found out they love propane a lot).
that was a 36 ft with 3 slides and it wasnt winterized like the guy I got it from said but it did ok. still had condensation on the windows .
 since then I got a 39fter and its winterized to the hilt and duel paned windows and it used a lot less propane . I dont think I will ever go back to the hotel bit agian. I like the idea of knowing who 's head was on the pillow the night before.
 when you meet people in a campground  there all usually friendly and everyone is usually helpfull if need be. all in all I would say its a lot less stressful doing it this way.

Kevin Prichard

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #20 on: Feb 17, 2004, 10:19 »
Used to be that the way to live during short outages was in an RV.  How is it today?
;D ;D I Like my 36  King of the road 5th wheel and find that if you buy a four season Rv with dual pane windows heated tanks and a little prep work, That you can be more than just a little comfey. I love it and have stayed warm and nice as cold as 30 below  the big 0 degrees. All my stuff is there and I know who slept there the night before me. Plus the fact that I can trout fish in the Rockies  ;D It is just like Home with no grass to mow ;)

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #21 on: Mar 13, 2004, 02:34 »
I spent a year traveling the US in a class 'C'. The biggest problem was towing a vehicle. If I did it again, or could afford it, a fifth wheel would be my preference.

I found a way around the tow vehicle problem...just buy a small enough motorhome so you can drive it to work every day.  This has the added advantage of letting you see more of the area, because you don't feel like you have to go back to the same site every night.
« Last Edit: Mar 13, 2004, 02:42 by UncaBuffalo »
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Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #22 on: Mar 13, 2004, 02:39 »
I was once on the Bandwagon with the RV concept yet a veteran mentioned that I had better have a strong, strong relationship with my spouse since prolonged living within a motor home or camper is not as simple as one may think.

I know many of you have endured this way of llife and would like to hear how you get by?

Thank you in advance.

Moke


This is a HUGE problem...I lived one outage in a 24' 5th-wheel with my Ex, but she chose to go to an apartment after that.

I think the guys who say "buy big" and "get as many slides as you can" have the right idea for couples.  (For us singles, I am already on record as "smaller is better").
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline Mike McFarlin

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #23 on: Mar 12, 2007, 08:44 »
Class A is the only way to go.
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Offline Al Eidson

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #24 on: Mar 13, 2007, 11:46 »
I travel with a 5th wheel and like having my own kitchen, bath and bed. Campgrounds are usually friendly and have a lot of advantages over motels and apts. Winter camping can be a challenge, but if you prepare and have the right camper it can be done. Cooper presented it's problems, but most of them were because the owner did not have frost free water hook-ups. We use the 5th wheel for vacationing also so we get our moneys worth out of it. One of the biggest savings is probally food. Cooking out is more enjoyable to me that constantly eating out. Everyone is diffrent and desire diffrent accomodations, but I choose camping.

dtrevathan

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #25 on: Mar 13, 2007, 01:11 »
I would not go on the road without my 5th Wheel. I have my own bed, bath, kitchen, and living room. Above all that, most plants I go to have campgrounds much closer to them than the hotels are.

Offline Camella Black

Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #26 on: Mar 13, 2007, 06:36 »
Well Henry and I don't camp on the road any more, but we were known to pitch a tent back in the day when money was tight and we were in training.

RADBASTARD

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #27 on: Mar 13, 2007, 07:07 »
When I was single a cheap crack house was always nice.

now motels or apts. now that im married

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #28 on: Mar 14, 2007, 09:29 »
My wife and I are "loving life"...living in our 39' Diesel Pusher with 3 slides.  Granted, winter can cause problems.....but we survived a winter in Ohio last year at the Mound.  Better here in San Francisco this year.....Motorhome has been our dream for years.  Double dipping on our P.D.  and mileage is the only way to go.  We cast our vote on a Class A....the only way to go. 

Bob
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outfield_4

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #29 on: Mar 18, 2007, 11:03 »
I'm looking at buying an RV to live in. I have a long term job in Illionis with my home in PA. I only have about 8-10 years left before retirement. Currently I am renting an apartment but have been thinking of getting an RV. I figured I can live in it for the last years of work, then use it as a vacation vehicle for my wife & I after retirement. My problem is I know nothing about RVs other than I would like to have the wife & company with me while I am driving. I hear that leaves out trailers that hookup to the vehicle. What about 5th wheels? Or is my only option an RV and tow my car? What should I look for when buying one? Both Il & Pa have cold winters. Most places I want to vacation is warm. Any help would be appreciated. ;D

dtrevathan

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Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #30 on: Mar 18, 2007, 01:03 »
Or is my only option an RV and tow my car? What should I look for when buying one? Both Il & Pa have cold winters. Most places I want to vacation is warm. Any help would be appreciated.


Go to rv.net. This web site is not the best place to learn about the RV lifestyle

Offline loravob

Re: RV Living on the Road
« Reply #31 on: Mar 20, 2007, 04:39 »
Having lived in an RV full time while working on the road, 5 years in a 5th wheel and 4 years in a class 'A', I would say that the Motorhome is the way to go.  A few times I had to park in a trailer park in Illinois because there are not any open campgrounds during the winter in the Byron area.  Had the same problem at Quad.  Found a campground in Maine that had a few winter spots.  Lived in the motorhome year around.  No problem if you insulate.  Take in to consideration the payment on the RV (interest is tax deductible) and the campground rent and weigh your options.  Happy camping!!! 8)
« Last Edit: Mar 20, 2007, 04:50 by loravob »

 


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