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How many S/G replacement projects have you worked?

One
9 (37.5%)
Two
2 (8.3%)
Three
4 (16.7%)
Four
2 (8.3%)
Five to Ten
6 (25%)
Ten or more
1 (4.2%)

Total Members Voted: 13

Author Topic: S/G replacement projects  (Read 6999 times)

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Offline Mike McFarlin

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S/G replacement projects
« on: Mar 12, 2007, 02:40 »
Five to ten range.
« Last Edit: Mar 12, 2007, 02:41 by Mike McFarlin »
"Duty is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less." General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.

Offline Mike McFarlin

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #1 on: Mar 16, 2007, 10:17 »
Most recent Comanche Peak.
"Duty is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less." General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.

ageoldtech

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #2 on: Mar 17, 2007, 04:36 »
When I finish this one, it will be number 15. “Boy is I tired!”

Offline guppy

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #3 on: Mar 17, 2007, 11:26 »
Hey, are you counting each generator or each nuke unit?  I was on the first, Surry!!! (house operator). Then H. B. Robinson (nightshift containment checkpoint).
Keep honking.  I'm reloading.

ageoldtech

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #4 on: Mar 19, 2007, 09:44 »
Hi ya guppy, I was referring to the nuke units. My first was Turkey Point 81-82. I missed Surry, I was still in High School.

Offline Mike McFarlin

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #5 on: Mar 19, 2007, 10:25 »
Young whipper snapper...but you caught up, didn't ya?
"Duty is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less." General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.

Offline guppy

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #6 on: Mar 20, 2007, 02:08 »
Surry was tough.  Many mistakes made there since it was the first and there was no historical data to go to.  The S/G was cut out at the legs against the bowl.  It sat that way for (literally) months until the new S/G was lowered into place.  Then, guess what?  The legs had sagged due to their own weight and now it didn't line up.  "Cooper Heat" was brought in to heat the bottom of the legs and expand the metal on that side thus bending the legs back into position.  Along with S/G replacement, TMI mods had to be incorporated.  The outages lasted somewhere around 12 and 18 months for the 2 units.

H. B. Robinson was no hayride either.  The S/Gs were cut out at the tubesheet and the new ones were manually welded into place from the inside.  Bowls were layered with heat resistant blankets to protect the lead and lead blankets to reduce the exposure.  Welders were in airline respirators and short staytimes.  Did I mention that the S/G had to be heated while welding?  Many happy times on nightshift there.  Jumping the bowls for surveys and adjusting lead.  I think that outage was only 7 or 8 months.  How fast are they now?
Keep honking.  I'm reloading.

ageoldtech

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Re: S/G replacement projects
« Reply #7 on: Mar 20, 2007, 07:02 »

H. B. Robinson was no hayride either.  The S/Gs were cut out at the tubesheet and the new ones were manually welded into place from the inside.  Bowls were layered with heat resistant blankets to protect the lead and lead blankets to reduce the exposure.  Welders were in airline respirators and short staytimes.  Did I mention that the S/G had to be heated while welding?  Many happy times on nightshift there.  Jumping the bowls for surveys and adjusting lead.  I think that outage was only 7 or 8 months.  How fast are they now?
[/quote]
I remember HB Robinson 1984; I was there for 2 years. I think the actual outage was 11 1/2 months “that was a money maker.”
I’m doing the ALARA thing at Comanche Peak right now, we are in outage day 23 and all 4 new S/G are set in place, RCS welding is in progress. We should shoot a flush RT on # 3 RSC cold leg tonight. At this pace we could come in under 60 days which would be a world record for a four loop Westinghouse. Yes, they are getting very fast!

 


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