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Grouting alternatives? High contamination control.

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Brett LaVigne:
Hey all.

I have a tunnel that runs underground for about 100'. It is highly contaminated with things like Pu-239,
Am-241, Sr-90 etc. etc. I want to fill it with grout, but that presents a weight problem for shipping. I am interested in any info on other materials that would do the same thing without the weight. Has anyone used a light weight foam product for a large area that will eventually be segmented with a diamond wire? Any ideas are appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Brett

Oh by the way, tunnel is about 3 1/2' squared.

UncaBuffalo:

--- Quote from: Brett LaVigne on Nov 10, 2010, 07:29 ---Hey all.

I have a tunnel that runs underground for about 100'. It is highly contaminated with things like Pu-239,
Am-241, Sr-90 etc. etc. I want to fill it with grout, but that presents a weight problem for shipping. I am interested in any info on other materials that would do the same thing without the weight. Has anyone used a light weight foam product for a large area that will eventually be segmented with a diamond wire? Any ideas are appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Brett

Oh by the way, tunnel is about 3 1/2' squared.

--- End quote ---

Is 25 pounds per cubic foot too much weight?  We had good luck with low density grout that only added that much weight...in your case, about 300 pounds per linear foot of tunnel, so...?

I gave you this info, but here it is for anyone else that is exploring similar options:
http://www.pigcoinc.com/application-large-component-removal.html

Sun Dog:
There is some potentially useful information contained in this White paper titled "Characterizing the Behavior of Polyurethane Grout."


http://cigmat.cive.uh.edu/content/conf_exhib/00_poster/7.htm

Rennhack:

--- Quote from: Brett LaVigne on Nov 10, 2010, 07:29 --- Has anyone used a light weight foam product for a large area that will eventually be segmented with a diamond wire? Any ideas are appreciated.

--- End quote ---

The two-component polyurethane foams work well for this application, as does low-density cellular concrete (LDCC).  They were used at rocky flats, Fernald, and they have been used to fill the duct work at K-25 (enriched uranium), prior to removal.  I've also used it to fill void space in very large 'over pack' shipping containers.

One of the techniques is to stick a long tube into the tunnel from one end, reaching the back end (sealed).  As the tunnel fills up with the foam, pull the tube back towards you.

http://www.em.doe.gov/EM20Pages/pdfs/pubs/itsrs/itsr1816.pdf
http://www.efcog.org/bp/p/doc/BP51-Rigid%20Poly%20Foam.pdf
http://www.p2pays.org/ref/14/0_initiatives/init/apr97/spot.htm


--- Quote ---The first void-filling technology demonstrated at Plant 1[Fernald] will be a low-density cellular concrete system by Pacific International Grout Company of Bellingham, Washington. LDCC is made by mixing portland cement with water, adding a foaming agent, and combining with a high-shear mixer. The resulting rigid, low-density cellular concrete is then injected into the process components.

polyurethane foam

The second technology demonstration will test the use of an expanded polyurethane foam as a void filler. In the formation of the polyurethane foam, two chemicals are mixed: a foaming agent and a catalyst. The two chemicals are kept separate until they reach the mixing gun, from which the mixture is immediately injected into the process components. Urethane Foam Specialists of Columbus, Ohio will apply this technology at Plant 1.

The benefits of these void-filling technologies are that (1) they will reduce the need to physically segment process components, thereby decreasing costs and increasing personnel safety, and (2) due to the low density of these materials, they will eliminate the need for significantly larger material-handling equipment when transferring the filled components to the disposal site.

--- End quote ---

--- Quote ---Two-component polyurethane foams (or froth foam units) come in separate containers, one for each component, and tanks operate conveniently from an upright position. Two-Component Standard Foams are ideal for Insulating and Sealing jobs that require a product designed for spray application over large surface areas or for filling large voids and gaps. Two-Component Foam is a chemically cured foam system. Each Foam pack includes both an “A” & “B” component. Dispensed through the included dispensing tool, the foam “A” and its curing agent “B” are mixed at the nozzle and cure much more quickly than One-Component Foams.

Fast chemical curing results in a higher expansion ratio for two-component polyurethane foams. This makes them suitable for spray-on applications and for filing holes and cavities. They have an R-value (aged) of approximately 6.0 per inch.
--- End quote ---

Rennhack:

--- Quote from: Marssim on Nov 11, 2010, 03:04 ---I thought you had pictures of these jobs posted in the galleries?!?

--- End quote ---

The pictures of ME foam filling shipping containers is here:

http://www.nukeworker.com/pictures/thumbnails-65.html

The pictures I THINK you are remembering were removed.

The pdf below has some good pictures in it.
http://www.efcog.org/bp/p/doc/BP51-Rigid%20Poly%20Foam.pdf

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