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winston

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Metal hip replacement
« on: Jan 03, 2011, 05:41 »
Hey, any of you know if metal hip replacement will keep you from working at a nuclear plant?

Offline Smart People

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #1 on: Jan 03, 2011, 06:39 »
If you have no problem doing the job, it should be no problem. There is not a radiation issue as far as I know. The only thing that comes to mind is that you will have to go through a metal detector every day. Usually security will need to know your situation once you have a badge and will need to give you a pat down or wanding whenever you come through.

That's the best I know right now. Maybe someone can give you a better answer.

And maybe someone can find a better thread for this than "Shopping" :P :P
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Offline peteshonkwiler

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #2 on: Jan 03, 2011, 06:51 »
Hey, any of you know if metal hip replacement will keep you from working at a nuclear plant?
If you can climb ladders, go up and down stairs, and carry your load it shouldn't be a problem.  If I had a metal hip replacement though, I probably wouldn't carry the Ca252 in my jeans 5th pocket.  ;)
« Last Edit: Jan 03, 2011, 06:52 by peteshonkwiler »
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Offline owsi84621

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #3 on: Jan 04, 2011, 06:27 »
I've had my right knee replaced, didn't affect work, just go about things a little more aware of how I move. Security however at one of the three plants I usually work at has a daily conversation with me were they use the wand and I ask them to guess what has been replaced. The other two plants are set to where I don't set off the metal detector at all.

diliigaf

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #4 on: Jan 04, 2011, 11:46 »

    ???  I have metal throughout my body and never had a problem, most of my metal is Titanium which helps... I had a stainless steel plate and screws in one of my wrists, it sometimes would alarm... So I had it replaced with Titanium...
   Titanium has a "low magnetic signature" making it less detectable... ( not totally).. Also it does not become magnetized, important if going through a MRI...  8)
   
  Having steel in my body for~ 30 years, working Nukes and flying countless times over the years, I have for the most part never had a problem... I hope this helps ease your questions... :) Peace...

Sun Dog

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #5 on: Jan 04, 2011, 01:00 »

If you can climb ladders, go up and down stairs, and carry your load it shouldn't be a problem.  


When did physical ability or 'load carrying' become a condition of employment?

Offline Contract SRO

Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #6 on: Jan 04, 2011, 03:41 »
When did physical ability or 'load carrying' become a condition of employment?

In many departments it may not be a requirement but in a department where NRC licenses are required, these are requirements that are evaluated to determine if you are (for lack of a better way to put it) Fit for Duty.

Sun Dog

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #7 on: Jan 04, 2011, 06:22 »
In many departments it may not be a requirement but in a department where NRC licenses are required, these are requirements that are evaluated to determine if you are (for lack of a better way to put it) Fit for Duty.

You know better than I what the physical requirements would be for Licensed Operators.  I didn't realize that ladder climbing was part of their testing or qualification process.  I have seen many Licensed Operators who couldn't (or wouldn't) climb a ladder if you held a gun to their head.  Maybe they got grandfathered in.

I know there are physical requirements for the nuclear cops and fire fighters.  It would be great to extend those requirements to other 'field' workers like Maintenance, Chemistry, I&C, and Rad Pro (house and contract).  Having a workforce that was fit enough to tote 50 lbs while walking up the stairs or scale a 20-foot ladder without hurting themselves would be a huge plus.




Offline Contract SRO

Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #8 on: Jan 05, 2011, 12:13 »
You know better than I what the physical requirements would be for Licensed Operators.  I didn't realize that ladder climbing was part of their testing or qualification process.  I have seen many Licensed Operators who couldn't (or wouldn't) climb a ladder if you held a gun to their head.  Maybe they got grandfathered in.

I know there are physical requirements for the nuclear cops and fire fighters.  It would be great to extend those requirements to other 'field' workers like Maintenance, Chemistry, I&C, and Rad Pro (house and contract).  Having a workforce that was fit enough to tote 50 lbs while walking up the stairs or scale a 20-foot ladder without hurting themselves would be a huge plus.





I know what you mean about some won't climb ladders.  The licensed operator is given a physical at least every two years (required by the NRC).  The tests may not include climbing a ladder but the testing gives them confidence that, if the operator had to, he would be physically capable of doing so.  I am not sure about all utilities but the one that I was employed with for over 25 years expected their NLO's to be capable of climbing and if they had a medical issue that would get better they would put them on some kind of admin duty until they could pass the doctors exams.  If it was a permanent condition they would encourage the person to be looking for another position somewhere in the company.

Offline Marlin

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Re: Metal hip replacement
« Reply #9 on: Jan 05, 2011, 12:37 »
   I may be a little dated but I thought all on shift personell were first responders for medical, fire brigade, and other plant emergencies until EMTs, firefighters, or other emergency personell showed up. I had to certify as an EMT on shift and go through fire brigade training at a local University and this was as a Rad Shift Supervisor for Illinois Power. It is hard to imagine that shift personell are not expected to be capable of performing these functions, which would include climbing ladders, carrying injured personell, manning a 2 1/2 inch fire hose etc..

License aside I would think job requirements would dictate physical capability.

That's just my opinion, I could be wrong.   D.M.     :old: [coffee]

 


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