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Author Topic: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs  (Read 25414 times)

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Offline EugenioGarnica

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #25 on: Dec 20, 2012, 03:38 »
I know this post is quite old, but just in case anyone is interested, here goes my opinion about the initial topic...

From wikipedia: The physical effects of anxiety may include heart palpitations, tachycardia, muscle weakness and tension, fatigue, nausea, chest pain, shortness of breath, headache, stomach aches, or tension headaches (...)  Panic attacks usually come without warning and although the fear is generally irrational, the subjective perception of danger is very real. A person experiencing a panic attack will often feel as if he or she is about to die or lose consciousness. The emotional effects of anxiety may include "feelings of apprehension or dread, trouble concentrating, feeling tense or jumpy, anticipating the worst, irritability, restlessness, watching (and waiting) for signs (and occurrences) of danger, and, feeling like your mind's gone blank" as well as "nightmares/bad dreams, obsessions about sensations, deja vu, a trapped in your mind feeling, and feeling like everything is scary."

Anyone familiar with mental health area will be sure the experiences described by the worker in japan is a panic attack. It does not mean he didn't feel that, he almost surely FELT all that he explains. Although for many people used to radioactivity it may seem stupid, the biggest harm radioactivity may cause on "normal" population is due to fear and apprehension. And this harm, as been shown on population near Chernobyl) may be VERY real (anxiety and depression disorders are quite hard!)!!!!!!! Just think on the chaotic craziness that may appear if a dirty bomb is detonated in a city, although the real danger due to radiation would be very small.

Regards,

Eugenio

PD: I have received doses of 180 mRem in less than one hour and confirm that some kind of coffes may be quite worse. On the other hand I think 1050 mRem in 20 seconds... it's quite hard and really enough to be very angry with the job planning!!!!

Offline GLW

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #26 on: Dec 20, 2012, 04:04 »
PD: I have received doses of 180 mRem in less than one hour and confirm that some kind of coffes may be quite worse. On the other hand I think 1050 mRem in 20 seconds... it's quite hard and really enough to be very angry with the job planning!!!!

415 mrem in 10 seconds, planned special exposure,...

it's called nukeworker for a reason,...

there's always burgerflipper if the zoomies make you anxious,...

I'm just saying,... [coffee]

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

Offline HydroDave63

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #27 on: Dec 20, 2012, 08:09 »
415 mrem in 10 seconds, planned special exposure,...

it's called nukeworker for a reason,...


Perhaps some should be called "Nukedworkers"  :P

Offline GLW

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #28 on: Dec 20, 2012, 09:12 »
Perhaps some should be called "Nukedworkers"  :P


pfffffffffft,....

415 is nuthin',....

I'm not an advocate for the "mostest with the dosest" but seriously, the number of colleagues I have (most older than me) with tens of rems of exposure is substantial,...

of those who have passed on scant few die from cancers that cannot be attributed to lifestyle just as much or more so than lifeswork,...

my grandfather worked the South Pacific in the 40's and 50's,...

he lived well into his 90's,...

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

Offline MGH

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #29 on: Dec 21, 2012, 01:02 »
There have been people who actually felt tingling from radiation exposure; however, explaining the tingling sensation was the last thing they said before losing consciousness.

There was also a case of an industrial radiographer who complained of pain in his gonads after entering a sterilization chamber with the source in the unshielded position. Of course, he is dead now. (You can find this one in the IAEA pubs section)


Offline EugenioGarnica

Re: Hypochondria in Rad Jobs
« Reply #30 on: Dec 21, 2012, 03:46 »
Ok, I must recognize that 415 mRem in 10s, as a planned (quite) special exposure is not so bad +K  :D I was thinking that for hamsamich as a "first experience" with radiation it was not perhaps the best one... -K
 
On the other hand, as MGH says... of course radiation is dangerous at high levels. In fact, after some discussion, we decided to put some scary (but real) photos of radiation accidents in our "basic nuclear handbook for beginners" so our workers didn't get overconfident on radiation-related tasks. I think a good level of training (theorical and practical) is needed to avoid  hypochondriac as well as kamikaze attitudes (and I have seen both!). Isn't it?

 


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