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Jamal

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Radiological Health Engineering Student
« on: Jul 22, 2014, 12:51 »
Hey everyone, I am a 2nd year student at Texas A&M University studying Radiological Health Engineering which is a good mix between Health Physics and Engineering. This fall I will be entering my second year and have some decisions to make. I gained a good amount of hours in high school that transferred to college, so I have some room in my schedule to do a couple different things. I have roughly 20 "free" hours that I can do something with. The only caveat is that I currently do not know what I want to do as a career (in the nuclear field). I was looking into Health Physics or Medical Physics, but I recently shadowed a Radiation Safety Officer and a Medical Physicist that was checking the calibration of various xray machines and found both to be boring. I would rather have a job more on the engineering side of things. I'm here for some advice to see what would be the best route for me to follow. They are in no particular order.

1. Take just 12 hours a semester and graduate in 4 years with a Bachelors.
2. Double degree in Radiological Health and Nuclear Engineering (16 hours avg).
3. Double degree in Rad Health and Math (15 hours avg).
4. Minor in 2 of the 3 following Statistics, Biology, or Physics (17 hours avg).
5. Fast track master's in Health Physics adding 1 semester to my degree plan.
6. Engineering Safety Certificate and/or Therapeutic Certificate.
7. None of the above, and graduate a semester early (15 hours avg).
 
« Last Edit: Jul 22, 2014, 12:55 by Jamal »

Offline hamsamich

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Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #1 on: Jul 22, 2014, 12:00 »
Just a shot in the dark, since I don't have one, but I would think getting the Nuclear Engineering degree would make you way more versatile in what job you would be qualified for.  Health physics would pigeon hole you somewhat.  Especially if you get bored easily.  As another thread said recently though, mounds of paperwork will probably be in your future.

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #2 on: Jul 23, 2014, 03:40 »
Just a shot in the dark, since I don't have one, but I would think getting the Nuclear Engineering degree would make you way more versatile in what job you would be qualified for.  Health physics would pigeon hole you somewhat.  Especially if you get bored easily.  As another thread said recently though, mounds of paperwork will probably be in your future.

What he said. 

Good luck.  :)
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline GLW

Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #3 on: Jul 23, 2014, 04:06 »

5. Fast track master's in Health Physics adding 1 semester to my degree plan.


Number 5.

"Hard" Engineering with Health Physics Masters,...

If you want to keep a hand in the Health Physics game,...

It's not my story, I do know two of those stories and they have both done well with wide ranging opportunities,...

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

Offline hamsamich

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Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #4 on: Jul 23, 2014, 07:31 »
One thing to add:  getting the safety thing may help versatility as well since that would give you access to non-nuclear jobs.  I just don't know how widely accepted the safety cert you are getting is.  There are some safety peeps on here maybe they could chime in.  Or maybe you just want to stick with nuclear. 

Jamal

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Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #5 on: Jul 23, 2014, 08:16 »

Number 5.

"Hard" Engineering with Health Physics Masters,...

Thank you all for the input, and would this degree plan be considered "Hard" Engineering. Or would it be better to pair Nuclear Engineering with a Masters in Health Physics?
The safety certificate is offered through the University and they say it is recognized by industry worldwide.

http://engineering.tamu.edu/media/831345/2010_bs_rhen_curriculum.pdf

Offline GLW

Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #6 on: Jul 24, 2014, 06:03 »
Thank you all for the input, and would this degree plan be considered "Hard" Engineering. Or would it be better to pair Nuclear Engineering with a Masters in Health Physics?
The safety certificate is offered through the University and they say it is recognized by industry worldwide.

http://engineering.tamu.edu/media/831345/2010_bs_rhen_curriculum.pdf

There are a lot of posts on a number of threads in these forums concerning the up and downs of a nuclear engineering degree,....

You should read them,...

You might want to cast around in other forums and at A&M also about what you speculate being an engineer is and the various lines of endeavour engineers actually populate,...

some are deskbound,....

some are in the field,...

some are groomed to be PMs,...

some are partners/corporate PEs,...

some assist research,...

a few fly airplanes in the USN & USAF,...

I'll add the same caution I always add,...

Work in the nuclear stuff because you want to and you know you want to,...

So first thing to answer is that nuclear is what you know you want to do,...

If you're not certain, then keep your options open and hard engineer in mechanical, chemical or electrical as those allow you to use your abilities over a broader range of options until you settle into what fits best for you,...

that's all I got, oh and know your calculus, calculus is the great differentiator,.... 8)

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

Offline GLW

Re: Radiological Health Engineering Student
« Reply #7 on: Jul 24, 2014, 06:09 »

..............The safety certificate is offered through the University and they say it is recognized by industry worldwide.


a certificate is nice,....

a certficate with 20+ years of practical application as a compliance officer is a job,...

a certificate with a brand new degree and little to no experience is,.........

well,... it's nice,.....

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

 


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