Career Path > Navy:Getting Out

Resume critique MM1/LELT

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Higgs:
It does not say that that is an alternative to EWS. In fact, it states:

 "For military personnel with the specified BS degree and requisite military nuclear experience (qualified in the military to manipulate control rods or supervise the manipulation of control rods), the flowchart in Figure 2.2 would be used to determine direct SRO eligibility. If the candidate is not qualified in those positions in the military, the employer may use the flowchart in Figure 2.3 with no credits for military time; and the candidate would need 18 months in a power plant staff position or 18 months as a qualified nonlicensed operator to meet the responsible nuclear power plant experience eligibility requirements for SRO training."


You currently have no degree, so for now, you would use figure 2.2. If you do get a degree, which no one will hire you as having a degree based on "expected graduation," then you would use 2.3 which the above paragraph applies to.


Justin

gzeiger:
I see. I missed that section. That's certainly clear enough.

There are a couple plants I would be delighted to travel across the country at my own expense to test and interview with, and some others I would consider carefully if at all.

My original goal was to ask what in my resume seems irrelevant for NLO applications. Any thoughts on that? I know there are some important differences in the job compared to what I've been doing.

Why would you say that it's not as easy to get into training as I think? Why would I be competitive now, but not with a license?

Higgs:

--- Quote from: gzeiger on Nov 15, 2014, 01:41 ---I see. I missed that section. That's certainly clear enough.

There are a couple plants I would be delighted to travel across the country at my own expense to test and interview with, and some others I would consider carefully if at all.

My original goal was to ask what in my resume seems irrelevant for NLO applications. Any thoughts on that? I know there are some important differences in the job compared to what I've been doing.

Why would you say that it's not as easy to get into training as I think? Why would I be competitive now, but not with a license?

--- End quote ---


Because it takes too long and too much money to license people, and we don't just give them up from ops very easily. We're all undermanned.

I'll read the resume closer later.

Justin

gzeiger:
Makes sense - that's what I thought you'd say. Really, if that's the case I'll be happy in Ops. It might sound weird but what I really want at work is to go home feeling like I did something important. In the Navy at least it's seemed like time spent on training had a bigger overall impact than time spent operating, plus I think I'm good at identifying key points out of the big picture.

On the other hand, maybe the world outside the Navy is organized differently enough that that isn't really the case. I don't think I'd ever have a problem with staying in a job because the company needed me there.

I really appreciate the help.

GLW:

--- Quote from: gzeiger on Nov 15, 2014, 02:08 ---....... plus I think I'm good at identifying key points out of the big picture.......

--- End quote ---

not so much,...


--- Quote from: gzeiger on Nov 15, 2014, 02:08 ---.... In the Navy at least it's seemed like time spent on training had a bigger overall impact than time spent operating,...

--- End quote ---

this is because your perspective is based on your self and not on reality,...


--- Quote from: gzeiger on Nov 15, 2014, 02:08 ---...On the other hand, maybe the world outside the Navy is organized differently enough that that isn't really the case.....

--- End quote ---

no, both are based on reality:

in the Navy the reality is that nuclear power plants are the best alternative for the aircraft carriers and submarines of a blue water, global projection, multiple fleet power projection force,...

the Navy does not have nukes to give nuke trainers something to do, the Navy has nukes because nukes do the job best for the needs of the US Navy, as soon as something better comes along nuclear powered ships will go away, just as sails and coal did before them,...

training is a necessary requisite to fight wars with nuclear powered warships,...

that's the reality of NNPP training,...

NNPP training does not exist for it's own sake,...


--- Quote from: Higgs on Nov 15, 2014, 01:51 ---Because it takes too long and too much money to license people, and we don't just give them up from ops very easily....

--- End quote ---

Commercial nuclear power plants exist to cost effectively put electrons moving through the grid and collect revenue for putting those moving electrons through the grid,...

When the cost effectiveness is no longer there the commercial nuke plant is no longer needed, when the plant is no longer needed, there are no more operating jobs, if there are no operating jobs, there is no need for those who train the operators,...

that's reality, and reality does not care about you,...

reality is a messy, never ending, clean up set, we are all just here to ride the wave or wipe out,...

your choice,...

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