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Author Topic: BSAST: Radiation Protection from Thomas Edison State College  (Read 8166 times)

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cedugger

  • Guest
Out of fear of redundant posting, I scrubbed through as many posts as I could this weekend that addressed TESC degrees or any RP/HP degree in general. There are dozens of posts that address, advise, and comment on the TESC Nuclear Engineering Technology (NET) degree, but the last real mention of TESC's BSAST in Radiation Protection was some 9 years ago. After an 18 month journey, I'm wrapping up my first degree and I wanted to share a little of what I've learned along the way.

In the recent past, I've had a couple fellow, former ELT's opt out of TESC's RP degree because the academic advisor mentioned that they would be required to go outside of TESC to acquire the credits needed in a few core areas of study. They had true interest in getting the RP degree, and let a few obstacles persuade them into the NET degree, and I'd like to provide some insight to anyone facing the same decision.

As everyone already knows, TESC is generous with the credits they transfer in from our NNPP experience. As an 11-year ELT (3396/3386/3376/9502), I had the option of xferring in either 79 hours for the NET or only 71 hours for RP. Based on my particular goals, I opted for the path of most resistance. All but 8 of those hours were general ed requirements and I also had to look outside TESC to get a few RP core credits, specifically for Radiation Measurements. As far as the general ed requirements, you can take them anywhere or just CLEP out.

If you don't have access to a local school offering HP courses, I suggest using Western Kentucky Community & Technical College in Paducah, KY. They're a feeder program to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and their courses are offered online. I took three courses through them this spring, Radiation Biology and Nuclear Instrumentation/Measurement I & II for a total of 11 credit hours that TESC pre-approved for xfer in. The gentleman instructing the classes makes himself very available to students. My Radiation Biology credits could have been satisfied through TESC's Radiation Biophysics course (only given twice in the past year), but I liked the course outline better at WKCTC, and it was an 8-week course vice 12 weeks. If anyone is interested in the course descriptions or course administrator contact, PM me and I'll forward along the info.

Something to watch out for with this TESC RP degree is that it only requires pre-calc as the highest level of math. Although it makes for an easier path to a degree, it can limit you in the future. Having planned in advance, and knowing that a full year of calculus would be needed to get admitted to Oregon State's Master of Health Physics program, I took Calc I & II as electives.

As far as how the BSAST:RP degree is looked upon in industry, I would have no idea in commercial nuclear power, but it will check some boxes in other applications. For example, it satisfied federal gov't health physics (1306) and physical scientist (1301) education requirements. As an RCT at DOE sites, I can't see it making much of a difference unless you're wishing to move from a tech position into an actual HP position.

As for me, it's a pre-req for moving on to Oregon State's MHP degree program. There are some other catches with respect to setting yourself up for that program as well, but I'll address that if anyone has any interest. I noticed that JsonD13 has experience with that degree already, so he's the person to ask there. By the way, Oregon State accepts the NET degree as JsonD13 has mentioned, and they accepted one student with NET last summer as well.

I hope this helps at least one person with interest in this program.

milo124

  • Guest
Since I'm starting my last semester at TESC I might add that the cost is also a big factor.  I had an AS degree in Radiation Protection from CFCC high when I started and was given 19 semester hours for my NRRPT certification.  Mainly, because TESC will only allow up to around 80 semester hours toward getting their BSAST in Radiation Protection.  Which means when they added it all up (years in the business, degree, certs), I was still looking at paying for another 40 credit hours (120 to graduate).  If you're a non resident of NJ, you're looking at an average of $700 per class (as of 2012/2013), which breaks down to 3 credit hours and your textbook if you buy it outside the TESC bookstore.  That doesn't include the annual enrollment of around $2650 just to take their classes (it does include academic advisement).  They also have a flat yearly rate which includes everything but your books that I believe includes up to 12 semester hours.  Just keep in mind that if you don't take the classes you won't get your money back - use it or lose it.  If possible, I would recommend attending a local community college in conjunction with the on line classes because it will save you a lot of money.  I needed the classroom instruction for several classes (as in Chemistry and Statistics) but remember to get them approved by TESC before you take them.  It's expensive (what college isn't), but on the plus side, completing the BSAST in Radiation Protection qualifies for the NRRPT 5 year maintenance recertification.

Also, congats to slavutich.

milo124

  • Guest

Offline ddickey

We had the NRC scholarship at my school also. It helped a lot. If you take enough credits you can also receive the scholarship over the summer semester.

Offline RFaunt

Thanks for sharing. I'll be starting with TESC next year after I finish my associates at Spartanburg Community College, so I'll definitely be applying. If I was a gold member, I'd give you kudos. Hopefully you'll accept my initiation of the slow clap.  [clap]
"If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." ~ Isaac Newton

milo124

  • Guest
Thanks for sharing. I'll be starting with TESC next year after I finish my associates at Spartanburg Community College, so I'll definitely be applying. If I was a gold member, I'd give you kudos. Hopefully you'll accept my initiation of the slow clap.  [clap]

No worries and best of luck with the education.  ;)

milo124

  • Guest
Update... I managed to complete my degree at TESC in 2013 and ended up in Waste Technical Services.  Haven't swung a meter in 10 years but still plugging away at getting rid of all the garbage at Hanford.  I haven't looked but can only imagine how much the cost of getting an online degree has gone up.

 


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