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Brian3848

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submarine conditions?
« on: Feb 26, 2005, 11:50 »
My current situation is I'm in the DEP program and contracted as an IT(information technology). I scored a 76 on ASVAB but my line scores did not qualify me for the nuke test. I'm wondering if I should retake the ASVAB, risking my current score, to try to qualify for nuke. I'm also considering submarine electronics, so i was wondering what submarine conditions are like because I am a little bit afraid of it I mean how can you guys possible maintain sanity without seeing the light of day for that long?

Offline PWHoppe

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #1 on: Feb 27, 2005, 05:59 »
My take on it is if your worried about it then it probably isn't for you. It never bothered me one way or the other. You get used to it. If you really want to be a Nuke re-take the tests, but if your happy being a a forward electronics type, don't bother.
If a chicken and a half can lay an egg and a half in a day and a half, how many days will it take a grasshopper with a rubber foot to kick a hole in a tin can?

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shayne

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #2 on: Feb 27, 2005, 07:41 »
Nuke it either subs or carriers, so if subs are not appealing, then consider the carrier.

Flooznie

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #3 on: Feb 28, 2005, 02:55 »
Submarine conditions can be a little scary the first time you go underway.  I admit, I did get a little nervous the first time those hatched slammed home and I knew I wasnt going anywhere.    It is a scary concept staying underwater for long periods of time.  The best way is to make the most of your underway time.  Work hard on quals, learn about your equipment, and excercise regularly. It will keep you occupied.   Keep yourself busy and the time goes by quickly.  Its not that bad.

ET1 (SS)

Offline Rufus

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #4 on: Feb 28, 2005, 06:49 »
My current situation is I'm in the DEP program and contracted as an IT(information technology). I scored a 76 on ASVAB but my line scores did not qualify me for the nuke test. I'm wondering if I should retake the ASVAB, risking my current score, to try to qualify for nuke. I'm also considering submarine electronics, so i was wondering what submarine conditions are like because I am a little bit afraid of it I mean how can you guys possible maintain sanity without seeing the light of day for that long?

Got this a while back (don't remember where)   :)

How to Simulate Submarine Life at Home!

1.  Surround yourself with a few people you don't like.

2.  Close all windows and doors tightly and close all curtains.

3.  Seal any openings to the outside world with a suitable vault door.

4.  Unplug all radios and televisions to cut yourself off completly
    from news, football games, Saturday Night Live, The Muppet Show etc...

5.  Hourly monitor all home appliances operating.  If not in use, make a
    note in a log book.

6.  If using bathroom, do not flush toilet for first two days to simulate
    smell of blowing sanitaries and venting inboard.  Then flush daily.

7.  Wear only blue coveralls, or proper Navy uniform.  No hats or T-Shirts.

8.  Cut your hair once a week, ensuring you make it look like you did it
    yourself.

9.  Work in 18 hour intervals to ensure you body really gets confused.

10. Listen to the same cassette over and over until you can't stand it
    anymore, then put one in that you can't even listen to without nausea
    setting in.

11. Set alarm to go off just as you fall asleep, with alarm set at loud,
    or buy a special alarm with various settings i.e. Battle Stations,
    Fire, Flooding in the Basement.

12. Prepare food with a blindfold on to simulate what real submarine cooks
    do.  Then take the blindfold off and try to get your dog to eat it.
    Then break out a can of tuna or peanut butter.

13. Cut your bed in half, and enclose all but one side using the dimensions
    of a small casket as your reference.  When not in bed, make up blankets
    properly even though no one will see or care.  For added touch of
    realism, have 3 people taking turns sleeping in bed, one of whom is in
    2 section appliance watch.

14. Periodically, for want of excitement, open main power breaker and run
    around yelling "Reactor Scram" until you are sweating profusely, then
    restore power.

15. Buy yourself a snorkel and mask, and again, periodically, just for want
    of anything better to do, put it on and pretend you're in a smoke
    filled room with no way out.  For added variety, hook up garden hose
    and pressurize.

16. To enable yourself to handle anything, constantly study wiring diagrams
    and operating instructions for various home appliances (stove, refrig,
    can opener).  For no reason at all, at specific intervals (monthly,
    weekly, etc...) tear one apart, just in case it was going to break.

17. Paint everything around you gray (Navy FSN gray, no substitutes) or
    off white.

18. To be sure you are living in a clean and happy environment, every
    Saturday set alarm on loud for a short but hated drill sound, then
    get up and manned with only a bucket, a sponge, and a greeny, clean one
    area over and over again; even if it was already spotless.  Then make
    out a discrepancy list.

19. Once a day, after normal programming hours, plug in the TV and watch
    one movie being careful that it is (A) at least 5 years old;(B) made
    long enough prior to showing to be sure you've seen it once before; or
    (C) so bad that you have to install a seatbelt in your chair to keep
    you there until it's over.

20. Since no doctor will be available, stockpile bandaids, aspirin, and
    Actifed since these are proven "cure-alls".  Practice if necessary on
    your dog (surgery, dentistry, etc...).

21. When commencing this test simulation, lock your family, friends, and
    anything else that means anything to you outside.  Test will run for
    at least 2 months with no specific end in sight and completion delayed
    at least twice for no less than 2 weeks.


What you have just read is a little bit of humor on the life of a real
submariner.  Some (a lot) of the things actually happen and by relating
these to common things at home I hope you have gained some insight into
the life of a submariner at sea.

cave_dog42

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #5 on: Feb 28, 2005, 08:08 »
what would the life be like on a carrier, aside from actually seeing the sun?

Offline Rufus

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #6 on: Feb 28, 2005, 08:35 »
what would the life be like on a carrier, aside from actually seeing the sun?

Probably like living in a small city (with that many people onboard a relatively small space). As a point of reference, I was onboard with my brother & could go a week without running into him (we were on different watchsections).

On a sub, the life is so busy, there is no time to worry about not seeing the sun. Initially in qualifying, standing watch, maintenance etc etc. After you're fully qualified, there's the 3 M's.

Besides, on the 6 patrols I did, there was only 1 that was a full 80 days. All there rest we pulled in for one reason or another.

s_Phoenix

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #7 on: Feb 28, 2005, 09:54 »
"what would the life be like on a carrier, aside from actually seeing the sun?"

Pretty much the same with these differences.

1.  Only slightly large sleeping space.

2. Signnifently larger personel storage space.

3.  6000 people to wait behind for  chow.  Even with at least 4 chow line, some cvn have up to 8 lines.

4.  24 hour days, of which drills start at 2200 (10 p.m.) and run un till 0700 (7 a.m.)  followed by traing and watch.  Then flight ops so you cant sleep do to the noise of planes landing or the jaring of them taking off.  (sleeping during drills is best, ahead flank shakes the ship nicely and rocks you to sleep.

5.  You still wont see the sun unless you travel to the nose bleed section's.  Nucs work under the water line.  Or if you smoke you will have to go to a weather deck and stand in a space for 20 people filled with 50 people.

6.  cable tv.  internet and plenty other people to trade dvd's with so you wont see the same movie for at least 5 days.

7.  Phones that cost 0.50$/min,  but you can call home if your missing it.

8.  Weekly at least, general quarters, where you suck rubber and lug a round a scba bottle that wiegh's 50 pounds.  and fire hose that dosent want to move or bend.

9.  daily clean the same space for an hour and repeat later in the day when XO get mad after find dust in the overhead.


java

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Re: submarine conditions?
« Reply #8 on: Mar 13, 2005, 09:18 »
To the guy in DEP as an IT...

If you like computers or electronics at all, I would not recomend going nuke. I am currently a nuke ET at prototype. Don't let them tell you that nuke ET's do all this computers and electronics stuff... I haven't seen a resistor since A-school... And from what i'm told, i probably won't ever do anything more than take out a bad card and put in a new one. Then send the bad card back to the manufacturer. If you like computers and software, and dabble with electronics, I would recomend AECF *Advanced Electronics Computer Field*. I had a guy at book camp with me in that field, and he is also already an E-4. There are other ways to fast advancement besides the nuke program. But, the bonuses aren't as nice I suppose.

 


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