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Offline Brian

Nuclear Engineer
« on: Feb 01, 2008, 01:23 »
Just wondering, but how much do nuclear engineers make?  With either a bachelors, masters, or doctorate degree.  Also, how much of a demand is there for them, and what kind of work is entitled.  Right now I'm in an engineering science degree, which is the liberal arts degree for engineers. But the way I see things going, is that nuclear is going to make a rather large surge.


Brian

Fermi2

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #1 on: Feb 01, 2008, 03:07 »
About the same as any other Engineer used in the industry and less than an Operator.

Probably 50K to 75K. A Masters or Doctorate might hire in a bit higher.

Mike

Offline tr

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #2 on: Feb 13, 2008, 06:55 »
Per salary.com, the starting salary for a graduating engineer (level I) is around 61K (for northern Ohio), and the salary for someone with around 10 years experience (level III) is around 85K.

Offline Loffy Muffin

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #3 on: Feb 14, 2008, 01:28 »
If you are just looking for cashola only, go to law school and get a patent attorney degree.  Engineer+Patent Attorney=Mullah, chicks, big city condo overlooking the lake/ocean, BMW M3, Company boxes to sporting events.   

If you can't stand the thought of going to law school, then:
I would go ME/EE and get the option of going to different fields.  An ME/EE has (probably) only a slight disadvantage to NE in nuclear power employment opportunities, but as an ME/EE you can go into many other fields.  Becareful of those specialized degrees unless you absolutely love the field. 

Oil/gas/EPC/OEM's all pay much more then Nuclear (for experienced) at the moment for engineers.  It may change....or it may not. Entry level will be about the same pay (We pay 65-70K).  But senior engineers in oil/gas/EPC/OEM pull 110-150K, bonus, OT.   

I know a few power plants that can't fill the experienced positons so instead of raising the pay they drop the standards/requirements.  At the moment, they have their heels dug in on pay.  I wouldn't bank on these millions of dollars to be made as an NE...yet.  The money to be made would be building nukes the next decade.  Get an SRO then bail and go into construction if you go nuclear..
See right through the red, white and blue disguise
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Offline Brian

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #4 on: Mar 24, 2008, 11:20 »
I would have to say that I am the most indecisive engineering student out there.  With the engineering science program that I am in I am going to end up taking statics, dynamics, Calc 1,2,3, Differential Equations, Chem 1,2 Physics 1,2,3, Microprocessors and Circuits, Basic and Advanced C++, and finally Strengths and Materials Sciences.  Then from there, I want to transfer into the program that I want.  Right now I am looking at Nuclear and Electrical Power Engineering but I am still keeping the options open to others.  So far I have looked at Rennselaer Polytechic Institute for Nuclear Engineering.  Then in April, I am going down to Penn State to see what there program is like.  However, if I fell back onto a program other than Nuclear, I would probably end up going to Clarkson University for EE.  One thing that I was wondering is what it would be like working for a foreign company like Areva?  Finally, what about something like Nuclear Physics?

Brian

Offline Loffy Muffin

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #5 on: Mar 25, 2008, 01:09 »
I think Clarkston is private.  You need to make sure they will accept your credits.
I would stay with a state school.  Do you live in NY?  Penn state will have tougher admissions for out of state and higher tuition.  NE should be easier to get into then EE.  EE is competitive.  NE (used to be) not very competitive. 

You need to make sure the schools you want will take your credits.  In state public, no problem.  Private school and/or out of state can be. 
You need to make sure you can transfer in as a junior (are U at a CC?).

Physics majors usually have a harder time getting jobs.  stay engineering.

Working for foreign companies, no big deal. 

Go to a state school that is the cheapest with the best rep, make sure the credits transfer...stay in engineering...the rest you need to figure out yourself.  personal stuff I can't answer.
See right through the red, white and blue disguise
With lecture I puncture the structure of lies
Installed in our minds and attempting
To hold us back
We've got to take it back, Take the power back

Offline number41

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #6 on: Mar 25, 2008, 08:17 »
My brother went to Clarkson (ME) and I went to RPI (NE).  I continually give him a hard time that RPI ranks higher in most surveys for quality of education, value and graduate satisfaction.  If you are seriously looking at both, RPI is definitely the better school for NukeE.  I think Clarkson's tuition is a little less, but it is located in BumF@#k!  Good luck, whatever you decide.
You can sleep when you're dead.

Offline B.PRESGROVE

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #7 on: Mar 25, 2008, 10:03 »
PENN STATE #1

Offline Brian

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #8 on: Mar 25, 2008, 10:30 »
I was looking at RPI for NE but the thing that I don't like about it is how much it costs.  Right now I am going to a community college, Broome Community College, which is quite a bit cheaper.  But to go to Penn State, even being out of state, is cheaper than RPI.  Right now, my backup plans are Clarkson for private and Buffalo University for SUNY.

Offline Nuclear Renaissance

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #9 on: Mar 25, 2008, 11:02 »
For a justification beyond the homestate-rooting-interest-fueled reply above, the Big Ten nuclear engineering programs are all ranked very well, and additionally have very strong ties to the region's nuclear utilities. Westinghouse, AREVA, and GE will also give strong looks at B10 grads (Westinghouse in particular for PSU), so you'd have a good amount of options. I think you'll like PSU's TRIGA reactor when you take a trip to see it, and their campus would give you all the "college experience" you need.
« Last Edit: Mar 26, 2008, 04:02 by Nuclear Renaissance »

Offline B.PRESGROVE

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #10 on: Mar 26, 2008, 08:56 »
It has been a while since I heard someone put that so eliquently.  Yes I am part and partial to Penn State, but you are right about the number of schools that will give you a great education in the field of NE.  I just have to.......you know...... try to steer them in the direction of the haloed grounds that is Penn State.

jhwatts

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2008, 11:06 »
It takes a few years before you get some experience after you get out of school. If you work as a criticality engineer you can make good money especially if you contract. Its easy to clear over 10k a month after getting about 10 years experience plus degree.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2008, 11:08 by jhwatts »

Khak-Hater

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2008, 10:43 »
To be honest, I don't think that anyone cares what school you went to after your first job.  Go to the cheapest with an ABET accredited program and instructors from whom you can actually learn something [I thought that UT in Knoxville was excellent].  The pay you earn during your career will be based on your performance on the job.  I've had several [old and young] RPI and Big Ten [even Harvard]  grads work for me over the years and I didn't notice anything special about any of them. 

Having worked as a senior licensing engineer, an Operations Engineer, Radiation Safety Officer, Health Physics Manager, Nuclear Safety Manager, and Corporate Nuclear Safety and Regulatory Affairs Manager for a corporation with sites in six states, I've never made as much money as I do as a rank and file Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Engineer.  I really can't afford to do anything else.

It's not uncommon for a NCS Engineer to make six figures at 28 and 150k at 32.  UT [real orange not burnt orange] and UNM [I think] offer NE degrees with specializations in NCS.  You might want to look into it.

MGM

Offline number41

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #13 on: Jan 26, 2009, 09:27 »
Wow, this is really old, but Marssim, I'm assuming you know RPI?  I can't wait to get back there this weekend (from NC).  Hoping to catch a hockey game, but I think they're away while I'm there. 
You can sleep when you're dead.

Offline number41

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #14 on: Jan 27, 2009, 04:01 »
I DON'T know the answer to that one.  Can you enlighten me.
You can sleep when you're dead.

Offline Hraesvelg

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #15 on: Aug 15, 2009, 01:06 »
To be honest, I don't think that anyone cares what school you went to after your first job.  Go to the cheapest with an ABET accredited program and instructors from whom you can actually learn something [I thought that UT in Knoxville was excellent].  The pay you earn during your career will be based on your performance on the job.  I've had several [old and young] RPI and Big Ten [even Harvard]  grads work for me over the years and I didn't notice anything special about any of them. 

Having worked as a senior licensing engineer, an Operations Engineer, Radiation Safety Officer, Health Physics Manager, Nuclear Safety Manager, and Corporate Nuclear Safety and Regulatory Affairs Manager for a corporation with sites in six states, I've never made as much money as I do as a rank and file Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Engineer.  I really can't afford to do anything else.

It's not uncommon for a NCS Engineer to make six figures at 28 and 150k at 32.  UT [real orange not burnt orange] and UNM [I think] offer NE degrees with specializations in NCS.  You might want to look into it.

MGM

What kind of education is ideal for a Crit Engineer?

Offline tr

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #16 on: Aug 15, 2009, 02:00 »
Criticality engineers usually start with a nuclear engineering degree.  One good way to get additional knowledge (and networking) about criticality is through ANS.  The ANS nuclear criticality division typically offers certificate courses during the semiannual ANS meetings.

Offline Hraesvelg

Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #17 on: Aug 15, 2009, 05:04 »
Criticality engineers usually start with a nuclear engineering degree.  One good way to get additional knowledge (and networking) about criticality is through ANS.  The ANS nuclear criticality division typically offers certificate courses during the semiannual ANS meetings.

Thanks. My undergrad is physics and I just finished a Master's in nuke engineering. I'll check out the ANS meetings thanks. I'm just now putting out resumes for other jobs.  

Offline tr

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Re: Nuclear Engineer
« Reply #18 on: Aug 15, 2009, 06:21 »
They apparently have a big criticality meeting coming up in September in Richland Washington.

ANS Nuclear Criticality Safety Division
http://ncsd.ans.org/site/index.html

2009 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting
http://www.ncsd2009.com/workshops.htm

 


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