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visserjr

  • Guest
Job Hunting
« on: Oct 26, 2005, 09:24 »
MM1 (SS) Here being medically retired due to arthritis. Just curious on the degree of difficulty in finding a job for EWS qualified. Would stay in, but my joints say otherwise.
Any help would be greatly apprecited.

shayne

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #1 on: Oct 27, 2005, 08:40 »
Depends on many different factors.  What do you want to do?  Where do you want to live?  How much time do you have before you need to work and when do you want to start?  How much money do you want to make?  How much time do you have to look for jobs, such as browsing the internet job sites, talk to recruiters or HR dept. and fly around the country to interview?

Finding a job is a job by itself, so it could be as difficult as you want it.

Have you attended TAP class yet?

« Last Edit: Oct 27, 2005, 08:42 by Shayne »

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #2 on: Oct 27, 2005, 10:39 »
Haven't been to Tap yet. I am still in the process of treatment. I've already had 2 surgeries, and am most likely going to have 2 more. I should be all done by the summer, and looking for a job then. I am curious as to what I can do now while I am layed up? I am currently a Nuc Planner. Basically,  I write depot level repair procedures for valves and so on. I love the job I have now, but am not opposed to working ops. I am just not sure which pays better, what I can realistically expect to make and so forth.

Thanks
John

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #3 on: Oct 28, 2005, 09:07 »
Some advice from a person who knows how to navigate through the commercial world with degenerative arthritis!

1: You need to be at least partly recovered. There are physical requirements for any entry level job (and at this point all you are qualified for is an entry level job, your EWS experience is meaningless in the commercial world).  Saying that, do not confuse entry level job with meaningless job!. Non Licensed Operator is one of the best and more complex jobs anywhere. In most jobs you'll need to pass at least an entry level physical, I doubt you'll be able to do this if recovering from surgery.

2: I have arthritis in both knees and one ankle, a torn rotator cuff AND I got out of the Navy with two permanently broken elbows. Both now have arthritis and both "pop" and lock up at times. I worked as a Non Licensed Operator, a Licensed Operator and as an SRO. If you're open about your limitations, and work within them, not using them as an excuse you should do ok. The bottom line, do you believe that with your physical condition that you'll be putting someone else at risk or will someone have to work harder because of you?

3: The best planners in the nuke industry are those who came from the crafts in the commercial plants. That's the direction many plants are heading, HOWEVER, any job you feel you are interested in and feel you can do you should go after!!!


If a guy whose base level of pain day in day out is equivalent to having your funny bone hit can succeed in this industry you should be able to do so.

Mike

shayne

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #4 on: Oct 28, 2005, 04:19 »
I am curious as to what I can do now while I am layed up? I am currently a Nuc Planner. Basically,  I write depot level repair procedures for valves and so on. I love the job I have now, but am not opposed to working ops. I am just not sure which pays better, what I can realistically expect to make and so forth.

Thanks
John

Get a resume together and do some job searches to see what jobs are out there.  If any of them are interesting to you, look to see what the requirements or what you need to do to meet the requirements.  Save some money and pay off bills so you can survive for month or so if your dream jobs doesn't start the day you get out.

Commercial nuclear non licensed operators (NLO) can make $60-100k (~$30/hr) a year depending on overtime and outages after initial training is complete.

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #5 on: Oct 29, 2005, 03:24 »
 I appreciate all of the advice Mike. I am only guessing, but am I correct to assume ops is like standing watch underway on a boat? I am hopeful after my next two surgeries that I will be able to be as active as any normal 28 year old. Unfortunately for me, the Navy won't send me to sea on a submarine with the screws I will have in my knees. I personally feel it will not interfere with my job, or endanger someone else. If that were the case I park my handicapped butt at the front of Walmart, and pass out carts. Enjoy your weekends.

John

M1Ark

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #6 on: Oct 29, 2005, 10:06 »
It is nothing like standing watch underway.  You take one set of readings during your 12 hour shift as an non-licensed operator.  The balance of your time you either hang, review  or walkdown tagouts.  Review upcoming test or perform testing during your shift.  You'll also respond to alarms received in the control room.  The non-license operator job is pretty busy at times but most of the time you have plenty of free time.

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #7 on: Oct 30, 2005, 12:33 »
M1Ark hit it right on the head, although your One set of readings will cause you to walk around more than your readings did in the Navy. Commercial plants are HUGE!.  If an alarm or piece of equipment is broken you might have to go back several times to inspect equipment. It's usually not the norm but can happen.

You'll also work at heights a LOT more than you did in the Navy, and usually you'll work in higher temperature environments.

For the most part when at power you should have a relatively flexible schedule.

Outages can require a LOT of work.  Usually there's a lot going on which will keep you humping all over the plant.

I was the same age as you when I broke my elbows and my artthritis started kicking into gear. Remember to make darn sure you get your paperwork filed with the VA!

Mike

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #8 on: Nov 09, 2005, 07:10 »
I appreciate all of the help and great advice. I am going to a Job fair in December. I have another question. Why does it seem that there are a lot of plants decomming in less than 10 years? Why would I move my family, get a house, and the plant decoms five years later? Are there plants(In the SE) that plan on renewing?

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #9 on: Nov 09, 2005, 08:07 »
I appreciate all of the help and great advice. I am going to a Job fair in December. I have another question. Why does it seem that there are a lot of plants decomming in less than 10 years? Why would I move my family, get a house, and the plant decoms five years later? Are there plants(In the SE) that plan on renewing?

This has info, including License Expiration dates for every facility on the country. So far as I know, you won't be seeing anyone decom a reactor in the next ten years, most if not all of those plants have a License Extension request in.

Many of the plants in the SE didn't license until after 1980. I believe the only two older ones, Hatch and Browns Ferry have extension requests in. Eventually they'll all extend.

Mike

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #10 on: Nov 11, 2005, 03:42 »
Thanks Mike. I am getting pretty excited. Duke and SCANA are going to be at the hiring conference. I am hoping to end up in NC or SC. My wife wants somewhere to live where I don't wear shorts to hang christmas lights. That's good to hear about renewals. My Aunt lives in Spartanburg SC, and says that the local news there reported that Duke would be building a new plant.

John

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #11 on: Nov 11, 2005, 06:07 »
That new plant is still a discussion in a board room. Don't look for it for at least another 12 to 15 years.

I believe Southern Company is hiring right now. I think they own the Vogtle plant in Georgia.

Also remember you're qualified to work at a dirt burner.

Mike

JsonD13

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #12 on: Nov 11, 2005, 07:23 »
Speaking of job hunting...
Iv'e got some time left in, but I was wondering if anyone has been able to get a job in the medical field (health/medical physics) straight outta the navy.  If so any pointers would be appreciated.

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #13 on: Nov 11, 2005, 07:29 »
I'm trying to think of the guys handle, I believe it was Rad Sponge. He was a very prolific poster at one time, then maybe 3 months ago or so he got out of the Navy and ended up doing RadPro in the medical field.

Mike

shayne

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #14 on: Nov 11, 2005, 08:25 »
I'm trying to think of the guys handle, I believe it was Rad Sponge. He was a very prolific poster at one time, then maybe 3 months ago or so he got out of the Navy and ended up doing RadPro in the medical field.

Mike
He is still active on the boards, he just follows after your lead..  When your profile name changes, he changes his...
Rad Sponge aka. RMK
http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=7369

JsonD13

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #15 on: Nov 11, 2005, 09:24 »
yeah i talked to him, hes doing HP stuff for a nuc med manufacturer, what im referring to is more along the lines of rad therapy/radiology

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #16 on: Nov 11, 2005, 10:44 »
You have to have a degree of some sort to do that.

Shayne LOL, I'm getting ready to change my name soon!

Mike

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #17 on: Nov 12, 2005, 04:31 »
Mike, Just curious. What in the sam hell is this Karma thing. I noticed some people have a carrier load, and others have even negative karma. Sorry to ask not up on the enviro starbuck weenie jargon.

John

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #18 on: Nov 12, 2005, 06:23 »
Well John,

I believe Karma is given is someone feels you helped someone else out. Sometimes I can be cranky, but I usually try to help those who are getting out of the Navy when they ask for job hunting help. The only times I don't is when someone getting out thinks their Navy training makes them Gods Gift and Saviour for commercial nuclear power.

I'm not sure who gives Karma, I know I've never seen a Karma Voter Meter attached to my handle :)

Your situation is so similar to what mine was that I'm hoping you get a great job and do well.

Have you checked out the TVA website?

Mike

visserjr

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #19 on: Nov 13, 2005, 09:43 »
Mike,

 If you don't mind my asking, how did you break your elbows?
I would love to work for TVA in TN. My family is from them hills above Johnson City. The problem is the Wife. Her family is from VA Beach. She doesn't like being too far away. I take it you work for TVA?

John

Fermi2

  • Guest
Re: Job Hunting
« Reply #20 on: Nov 13, 2005, 10:30 »
Yepper, I moved here from Michigan and love every minute of it.

I'm only 8 hours from Virginia Beach, 8 1/2 hours from Cleveland (my hometown), 8 1/2 hours from my buds in MIchigan, 7 hours from my best friend, 6 or 7 hours from Disneyworld, and 2 hours from the Smokies, I'm not sure life can get any better.

I'll PM you the TVA website.

I'll tell ya about my elbows later. I gotta  get ready for a family picture :(

Mike
« Last Edit: Nov 13, 2005, 10:33 by Tracer Bullet »

 


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