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reactorcowboy

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Little Operational Time
« on: Apr 16, 2007, 01:35 »
I am an ex MM2, never had a chance to qualify above ERLL due to injuries.  I have been plugging away at the civilian nuke world for 2 years now.  Just went to my first interview and got turned down for the job.  Everyone says I do not have enough experience or the proper qualifications.  Is there anything out there for me? Or is the five and a half years I did spend in the Navy useless?

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #1 on: Apr 16, 2007, 01:48 »
One of the guys in my last AUO class was ex navy MM3 discharged prior to qualification at Prototype!
If you have a good attitude and a good work ethic, there is definitely a place for you. You may have to go to a "troubled" plant in order to get your foot in the door of commercial nuclear power.
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
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reactorcowboy

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #2 on: Apr 16, 2007, 02:25 »
define "troubled", and how would i go about looking for that?

reactorcowboy

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #3 on: Apr 16, 2007, 02:25 »
Oh and Thank You very much, hope has been rekindled.

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #4 on: Apr 16, 2007, 02:38 »
Certain plants have a reputation for hiring any NNPS graduates. Now I am not calling any names, but this link may be useful.  ;)

http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,977.0.html
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Offline HydroDave63

Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #5 on: Apr 16, 2007, 04:13 »
Certain plants have a reputation for hiring any NNPS graduates. Now I am not calling any names, but this link may be useful.  ;)

http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,977.0.html

http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,9921.msg56020.html#msg56020

could also be useful...

Fermi2

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #6 on: Apr 16, 2007, 04:41 »
Usually a plant doesn't get on the troubled plant list because of their personnel. It's usually management issues.

I can tell you when I got to Fermi they'd been on the troubled plant list and they were VERY picky as to who they hired. If you weren't EWS/EEOW/or Staff Qualified you might as well have not put in your resume.

The best advice is for this guy to get some more education, work at a dirt burner or something similar and get some real experience then take a shot at nuke.

Mike

Charles U Farley

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #7 on: Apr 17, 2007, 03:45 »
Certain plants have a reputation for hiring any NNPS graduates. Now I am not calling any names, but this link may be useful.  ;)

http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,977.0.html

What's funny about this, is I just applied to a posting on their website earlier today!  Within ten minutes of hitting apply on their  webpage, someone had replied via email. ;D

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #8 on: Apr 17, 2007, 07:34 »
You may have to go to a "troubled" plant in order to get your foot in the door of commercial nuclear power.

BZ is right (ouch that hurts!) in that many plants that meet the NRC / INPO guidelines for "troubled" are very picky. Perhaps the better term would be "Chronically under-staffed with elevated attrition".

Now that I have "revised and extended" my previous remarks, the link previously given is still valid.

You may also like this link:

http://www.nukeworker.com/adserver/adclick.php?bannerid=121&zoneid=2&source=&dest=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fplcareers.com%2F
« Last Edit: Apr 17, 2007, 07:35 by Roll Tide »
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Rad Sponge

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #9 on: Apr 17, 2007, 08:38 »
You have the potential, you finished the training pipeline.

You are highly employable in the entry level nuke jobs.

Don't let a few HR folks from a few places jade your overall outlook.

PM me if you would like to discuss your resume, interviewing preps, etc.

I can assist you with your Mojo.

Its all in the presentation.

Fermi2

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #10 on: Apr 17, 2007, 10:52 »
You have to believe in yourself and give off an attitude that you are the man for the job.

Here's some hints to get interviews.

1: Find out who the major players are in the industry. By that I mean the utilities.

2: Find out the reactors they own. When I was getting out I actually called the NRC, they sent me a list by reactor, reactor type and owner. I took this list, and made a notebook, each page of the notebook had the reactor, location, type, and any info I could get on the company. Go to your library, Standard and Poors is a GREAT source of info for corporate structure.

3: Using the above info I sent cover letters and resumes to every Reactor in the Country. By that I mean I sent it to the CEO, and VPs for the various sites (available in Standard And Poors). If I had info on the site management I sent it too.

4: While waiting for my replies I rated every reactor by location, age, reputation and other criteria that was important to me and my family. I knew what financial range I'd need for each area, and was able to determine the pros and cons of each area. Be flexible, the Reactor where I originally ended up wasn't in my top 20 until I interviewed. After I interviewed it moved up very quickly based on plant age, money, and the area was close enough to my number 1 selection for it to fit. Also there was no nUkeworker in 1990 so I had no idea about which companies were union and non union. The company I chose promoted to RO based solely on ability and not seniority. I knew based on ability I'd be a lock for a license class very quickly and did not want to wait 9 years (which was the average wait at a Union plant at the time)

5: As you get more info you might want to change your criteria. For instance initially my top list of plants was all PWRs because I was ex Navy and I thought BWRs were dose traps and somehow deficient. I ended up spending almost 15 very happy years at a BWR. My number 1 choice actually called me after I started at Fermi but I felt it non apprppriate to leave a company after only 3 weeks. My number two choice is where I currently work, they were in the middle of a massive downsize and told me most likely they wouldn't be hiring for 10 years.
I ended up at number 3 which as I said originally rated low.

6: Take ANY interview you are offered. I interviewed for 15 jobs at 13 plants and ended up with 15 job offers. This was at a time when the industry was cutting back, It can be done.

7: Once you get a contact in a plant or utility BE obstinate as heck. By that I mean every few days call them. I got an interview at Davis Besse during a HIRING FREEZE simply because I would not leave their local HR contact alone. They finally interviewed me to make me go away, then ended up giving me a job offer. (the one I got 3 weeks after starting at Fermi)

8: Do not ever accept don't call us, we'll call you after you interview, keep calling back starting the day after you interview.

9: Find the nuclear websites for the companies. If you have trouble finding the various reactors try nrc.gov. I'm not going to post a link as I believe if you are a nuke you should be able to find this info on your own.

10. I was able to get employed during a period of downsizing and without use of the internet. You should be able to.

11: In Jason YP just because the guy has completed the pipeline means nothing anymore. As I've interviewed Navy Nukes over the past few years I've found on the average the guys coming out now are nowhere near as good as those from the mid to late 90s and before. It's a Pump now, not a filter. A good nuke is a good nuke no matter what, I'm merely saying the Bell Curve for the Navy is going down. Commercial interview questions are becoming increasingly sophisticated as in many jobs, even entry level ones the philosophy is to get people you want to be in charge some day.

12: For reactorcowboy who is "everyone"? Is he/she related to He/She Said or They Told Me?
Whenever I see the word everyone my first thought is you better start looking within.


Mike

Rad Sponge

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #11 on: Apr 17, 2007, 12:21 »
You have to believe in yourself and give off an attitude that you are the man for the job.


11: In Jason YP just because the guy has completed the pipeline means nothing anymore. As I've interviewed Navy Nukes over the past few years I've found on the average the guys coming out now are nowhere near as good as those from the mid to late 90s and before. It's a Pump now, not a filter. A good nuke is a good nuke no matter what, I'm merely saying the Bell Curve for the Navy is going down. Commercial interview questions are becoming increasingly sophisticated as in many jobs, even entry level ones the philosophy is to get people you want to be in charge some day.



Mike

I agree with that assessment, but it does not hurt to encourage the fella. The interviewing process will determine his merit, not our opinions of the nuclear program.

Fermi2

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #12 on: Apr 17, 2007, 12:39 »
Yeah I agree Jason, my biggest pet peeve on an interview is when a guy comes in and blows it simply because he thinks his background or previous experience makes him a shoo in and doesn't take the interview seriously.

I've seen it happen time and again and it happened to my best friend in an interview with TVA.

If you are confident the interviewers will have more confidence in you. First impressions are extremely important. I've been in job interviews where I was asked if I could perform certain tasks which I had never done. I told them well at one time I'd never been in a nuclear plant but I learned it. The key is be confident in your abilities, show your confidence without being arrogant, respect the interviewers, and don't rely on your background or lack thereof to be your selling point. Only you determine who sells you.

At both my plants we've hired people who have no real nuclear operating experience whatsoever however during the interviews they've displayed the above traits.

Mike

Rad Sponge

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #13 on: Apr 17, 2007, 02:16 »
Yeah I agree Jason, my biggest pet peeve on an interview is when a guy comes in and blows it simply because he thinks his background or previous experience makes him a shoo in and doesn't take the interview seriously.

I've seen it happen time and again and it happened to my best friend in an interview with TVA.

If you are confident the interviewers will have more confidence in you. First impressions are extremely important. I've been in job interviews where I was asked if I could perform certain tasks which I had never done. I told them well at one time I'd never been in a nuclear plant but I learned it. The key is be confident in your abilities, show your confidence without being arrogant, respect the interviewers, and don't rely on your background or lack thereof to be your selling point. Only you determine who sells you.

At both my plants we've hired people who have no real nuclear operating experience whatsoever however during the interviews they've displayed the above traits.

Mike

We are in complete alignment on all your fine points.

 8)

Offline Roll Tide

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #14 on: Apr 17, 2007, 03:13 »
"Everyone" was every place that I contacted or contracted me after I placed my resume with them.  I think i have it figured after reading everything.  I wasn't "pushy" enough.  I let them call all the shots.  Thanks for all the information too.  It all helps.

1: You replied on a different thread. Makes perfect sense today, but will not benefit future job searching Navy Nukes.

2: You have learned a valuable lesson. You have looked back at your previous actions and found your own errors. You have accepted ownership of those errors, and determined to not repeat them. Sounds like you were a good (if unqualified) Navy Nuke and will be a good fit for commercial Nuke.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
.....
And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Rad Sponge

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #15 on: Apr 17, 2007, 04:27 »
1: You replied on a different thread. Makes perfect sense today, but will not benefit future job searching Navy Nukes.

2: You have learned a valuable lesson. You have looked back at your previous actions and found your own errors. You have accepted ownership of those errors, and determined to not repeat them. Sounds like you were a good (if unqualified) Navy Nuke and will be a good fit for commercial Nuke.



I concur with that assement.

Keep charging. In the end, it was Axealons loss!

adamva

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2 1/1 year nuke getting out
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2007, 01:30 »
I'm a nuke MM3, I've been in 2 1/2 years and served on a submarine for about 7 months. I qualed ERLL, ERF and SRW and I'm wondering if I would have a shot at an NLO position at a nuke plant. I still have a secret clearance and I will be getting an honorable discharge. I don't have a degree and I obviously don't have a lot of experience. I know that the navy makes it seem like the pipeline makes you really marketable and all but I don't know if a plant would really consider picking me up as an NLO or anything else for that matter. If I don't have a feasible shot at a plant position would a thomas edison BSAST help out at all or what other industries would really look at hiring someone like me?

I have applied to the nuke plant in Surry, VA and they want me to fill out a questionnaire and send them a resume and then they may set me up with an interview and testing etc.

One of the first questions on the questionnaire is "Do you have at least 6 years nuclear power experience?" Is this really that vital. It would seem that if 6 years experience was mandatory that it would be impossible for anyone to become an NLO without serving as a navy nuke first. There website doesn't say that 6 years experience is mandatory just preferable. So does my 2.5 years experience help at all or am I out of luck. Thanks for all input ahead of time, Adam

LaFeet

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Re: 2 1/1 year nuke getting out
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2007, 03:29 »
Adam,
 any experience helps and any "higher learning" can only aid you in you quest.

I do suggest you look back through the MANY threads on this particular topic..... itsa dead horsey

 Good luck on your civilian path...

visserjr

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Re: 2 1/1 year nuke getting out
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2007, 06:22 »
I am an NLO at Surry in the training program. The best I can tell you is to be open, honest, and eager. Focus on your strengths, and how they will help you here, and focus on how to improve your weaknesses. Have a plan, a goal, and be confident. Any Surry specific questions you might have, PM me. I have only been here six months, but I know the pay, schedule and "stuff like that"

Offline hamsamich

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Re: 2 1/1 year nuke getting out
« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2007, 08:38 »
I've seen them give the job (operator) to people with less experience at some plants.  Any exnavy nuke looks good when the crop of pickins aint too hot.  You made it thru prototype and qualified some good watchstations (good job on SRW).  You really don't NEED the Thomas Edison, but it is not a bad idea depending on how far you want to advance.  If you interview well, you WILL get a job, I'd bet a 1000$ on it.  Even if you don't interview well you can get an operator job at a less desirable plant anyway, so no sweat if you are not too picky.  Some people will try to tell you that ex-navy nuke is no shoe-in, but from what I've seen, it will EVENTUALLY get you something. Good luck, pm me with questions.

Don't forget about unemployment (any state more $$ = mass. and penn) and don't forget about contracting to get your feet wet! j

LaFeet

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2007, 07:07 »
This has been some good threading..... I just might have to apply for a position now.

Fermi2

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Re: 2 1/1 year nuke getting out
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2007, 12:25 »
I'm a nuke MM3, I've been in 2 1/2 years and served on a submarine for about 7 months. I qualed ERLL, ERF and SRW and I'm wondering if I would have a shot at an NLO position at a nuke plant. I still have a secret clearance and I will be getting an honorable discharge. I don't have a degree and I obviously don't have a lot of experience. I know that the navy makes it seem like the pipeline makes you really marketable and all but I don't know if a plant would really consider picking me up as an NLO or anything else for that matter. If I don't have a feasible shot at a plant position would a thomas edison BSAST help out at all or what other industries would really look at hiring someone like me?

I have applied to the nuke plant in Surry, VA and they want me to fill out a questionnaire and send them a resume and then they may set me up with an interview and testing etc.

One of the first questions on the questionnaire is "Do you have at least 6 years nuclear power experience?" Is this really that vital. It would seem that if 6 years experience was mandatory that it would be impossible for anyone to become an NLO without serving as a navy nuke first. There website doesn't say that 6 years experience is mandatory just preferable. So does my 2.5 years experience help at all or am I out of luck. Thanks for all input ahead of time, Adam

Why don't they ever seach first?


Hey visserj, If you get a chance can you please tell Bill Parker, a Shift Manager that Bru from the INPO SM Seminar circa 2000 says hello! Bill is one of the very best in the whole industry and a great person to boot, I learned a lot from Bill at that seminar! Tell him I completed my transformation from BWR guy to Westinghouse PWR :)

Mike

Offline hamsamich

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2007, 03:31 »
probably the same reason they don't stay on topic

Fermi2

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Re: Little Operational Time
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2007, 04:28 »
probably the same reason they don't stay on topic

BZ's general observation on Internet forums/threads etal, By the 5th post in any thread it starts drifting off topic. By 12 to 15 it has nothing to do with the original topic and if it surives to 30 or so it magically gets back on topic. This applies almost everywhere.

Mike

 


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