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Ditka

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Hi,

An opportunity is starting to materialize to possibly work at Duke Power near Charlotte as an Engineer but it is a contract job with Aerotek. So in essence I would be working for the contracting company rather than for Duke directly. The recruiter says that this would be a long term contract (2-3 years). He stated that Duke has a 'hiring freeze' now but they do hire contracted engineers to get around this and that these jobs generally turn into full time positions when the contract is near expiration. I have never been hired as a contracted employee (engineer) before. I have some concerns about this type of hire and they are as follows:

1) Do contracted engineers get any yearly raises?

2) Has anyone out there hired on as a contracted engineer from another state? Did the contracting company help with the move (i.e. relocation package, sign on bonus)?

3) Does the scenario ever arise where the need for the contracted employee ceases during the middle of the contract? Does Duke Power have the authority to cancel a contract (not due to lack of performance) because for example they decide that they cannot afford the cost any longer due to cut backs etc..? Does Aerotek have the ability to move the contracted salary employee to another facility or will / can the contract verbiage prevent this? I have never taken a job such as this before and I don't want to be in a position where after a year and a half into my contract I am told by Aerotek that Duke wants me to transfer to South Carolina to work at another plant to meet there staffing needs, otherwise my contract will be nullified. This type of situation would not be to my benefit since I have two children and a wife to care for.

Any info / insight would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Offline Laundry Man

Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #1 on: Apr 22, 2009, 07:20 »
As a former contractor I can firmly state that you basically have no control of your destiny.  You could be there today and gone tomorrow.  I was a former contract employee at Duke but it did not bother me when I was informed of my pending departure.  I knew up front that it could be a week, a month or possibly longer.  Read your contract, but, I would find it hard to believe that you would have guaranteed employment at Duke or any other facility.
LM

Offline HydroDave63

Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #2 on: Apr 22, 2009, 12:39 »
As a former contractor I can firmly state that you basically have no control of your destiny. 

+K to ya!  In these times, why leave an in-house job with benefits?

Offline Lorrie Henson

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Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #3 on: Apr 22, 2009, 05:20 »
Hi,

An opportunity is starting to materialize to possibly work at Duke Power near Charlotte as an Engineer but it is a contract job with Aerotek. So in essence I would be working for the contracting company rather than for Duke directly. The recruiter says that this would be a long term contract (2-3 years). He stated that Duke has a 'hiring freeze' now but they do hire contracted engineers to get around this and that these jobs generally turn into full time positions when the contract is near expiration. I have never been hired as a contracted employee (engineer) before. I have some concerns about this type of hire and they are as follows:

1) Do contracted engineers get any yearly raises?

2) Has anyone out there hired on as a contracted engineer from another state? Did the contracting company help with the move (i.e. relocation package, sign on bonus)?

3) Does the scenario ever arise where the need for the contracted employee ceases during the middle of the contract? Does Duke Power have the authority to cancel a contract (not due to lack of performance) because for example they decide that they cannot afford the cost any longer due to cut backs etc..? Does Aerotek have the ability to move the contracted salary employee to another facility or will / can the contract verbiage prevent this? I have never taken a job such as this before and I don't want to be in a position where after a year and a half into my contract I am told by Aerotek that Duke wants me to transfer to South Carolina to work at another plant to meet there staffing needs, otherwise my contract will be nullified. This type of situation would not be to my benefit since I have two children and a wife to care for.

Any info / insight would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

I believe all your questions should be asked/answered from Aerotek.  I have been involved in some long term contracts, and I have never heard of a company paying for relocation.  That's what your per diem is for.... living expenses while away from your permanent residence... at least for the first year.  You should negotiate with the contractor what will happen after your first year... and that negotiation should take place BEFORE you sign/agree to a contract.  Remember, this is a contract, you are the contractor and Aerotek is the contracting agency.  At any given time, you may leave, or they may ask you to leave.... money may run out, etc.  You need to weigh all the options before agreeing to a contract that MAY go 2-3 yrs.   We are contractors and every job is a gamble, for the company and for us.

Good luck.

Offline Laundry Man

Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #4 on: Apr 23, 2009, 03:14 »
+K to ya!  In these times, why leave an in-house job with benefits?

Thanks, just trying to explain my past experiences.
LM

Ditka

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Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #5 on: Apr 24, 2009, 12:26 »
Thanks everyone for you comments and honesty. I am starting to believe that the risk may not be worth the reward, especially with a wife and two little ones at home...
Take care!


Offline Already Gone

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Re: Any previous contracted Duke Engineers out there?
« Reply #6 on: Apr 25, 2009, 07:45 »
Unless you plan to be a road warrior, don't leave a stable job to be a contractor.  Hiring contract engineers is not the same as hiring engineers.  As soon as this project - or your involvement in it - is over, you are out of a job.

If they are telling you 2 -3 years, you won't even get per diem or reimbursement for living expenses.  This means relocate or have two residences at your own expense.  Not impossible, but not ideal either.

Forget raises.  You might get one when you go to the next job, but almost never during one.

As far as altering the contract YOU WON"T HAVE ONE!!!  The word "contract" refers to the agreement between Duke and Aerotek.  Duke can literally micromanage your hours and when and for how long you will be there (depending on the type of contract they have) and send you packing at will.

Of course, these are all generalities.  You should ask Aerotek to give you a written contract, and ask them to put these things into it -- such as guaranteed minimum payment, relocation, etc.  Who knows?  Maybe they will.  If they don't, however, your employment will be totally at will (meaning at the whim of someone other than you).
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

 


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