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Offline merchantg

Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« on: Aug 25, 2009, 11:45 »
Been years since I trolled these forums, they have grown very nicely. Well after many moons of industrial maintenance after my Navy nuc time I have decided to wrap up my degree and seek greener pastures. That being said I was looking for job oportunity and future prospects for design and testing for M.S. in Nuclear engineering. Plasma physics, core design, vessel design, etc they are all topics I have been closely monitoring for the last decade. I am absolutely not interested in operations, interacting with ops is fine but I would like to put the shift life behind and work on something I can make a difference on.

Anyone point me in the right direction? Who might be hiring? Should I reach out to some companies prior to receiving my degree? I will be finishing up my B.S. in a couple semesters then moving on to M.S.

Thanks
George

Offline HydroDave63

Re: Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« Reply #1 on: Aug 26, 2009, 12:17 »
NRC is always hiring. Check www.fedjobs.gov

Offline tr

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Re: Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« Reply #2 on: Aug 26, 2009, 01:33 »
Westinghouse, GE, AREVA, and most utilities are also possibilities.  The reactor vendors and AE firms are hiring due to the new plant work that is going on, the utilities are hiring because a lot of the engineering staff is at or near retirement.

If I were you, I think seriously about trying to get on with someone pretty serious about a new plant (such Vogtle).  Working as a startup engineer can give you opportunities that are impossible to get once the plant is in operation.  During the plant startups in the 80's, I was able to climb down inside a reactor vessel, examine the piping in the systems that later became very high radiation areas, run tests like a shutdown from outside the control room (only performed once in each plant's lifetime), and so on. 

Starting salaries I have heard about recently are in the 70+k range for BS degrees.

Offline merchantg

Re: Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« Reply #3 on: Aug 26, 2009, 09:42 »
Startup Engineers wouldn't be filled from SROs ? If opened up I would love that experience, if for nothing more than the experience. Im not thrilled with the idea of working in Govt lab but nuke world is a bit exciting now all over the place.

I wouldn't mind stopping at my B.S. But it is a Nuc Eng TECHnology degree more of a filler for my masters. I have seen a general poor attitude towards these degrees but it is my only option as a working man in GA. And it still just fine for the prereqs towards M.S.

Thanks for the replies. Im going to start doing some networking, maybe I can do a fellowship through some one when I start Masters, as I will have to drop the job to do it. I will be going through GA Tech for M.S.

Thanks again
George


Offline tr

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Re: Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« Reply #4 on: Aug 29, 2009, 02:18 »
Traditionally, most pre-op and startup testing was done by engineers.  On shift SROs don't have the time to do all the stuff needed to run a large test (research the test, review the vendor test criteria and guidance, write the procedure, get the procedure through the site review and approval process, get it approved by the NRC, set up the test equipment, schedule and run the test, review the test results, prepare the reports needed for the various licensing documents, etc.).  Offshift SROs tended to be rare in the old days of startup testing, and probably still will be when the new plants start up (as people licensed on the current Vogtle plants would need to be trained and licensed separately for the new AP1000 units).

Have you looked into scholarships offered by ANS and INPO?  I know ANS offers many 2000-5000 scholarships (not much, but cash is cash).  INPO also used to offer some scholarships.  INPO is in Atlanta, not sure if they offer internships or fellowships.

Offline merchantg

Re: Nuclear Engineering (Design,testing) not ops
« Reply #5 on: Sep 02, 2009, 01:56 »
Thanks tr, no I hadn't looked into those particular scholarships. Very good info and INPO is in Atlanta  :o Icing on the cake. Man now I remember why I loved these boards. The M.S. is pricey but not too bad. Any help is much loved. Im looking at getting masters at GA Tech. Looks like they have the room as I believe most people are intimidated by nuclear engineering. I personally feel EE is tougher and pays less, but hey don't tell anybody I said that.

 


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