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Offline xblue7

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Career Research Assignment
« on: Nov 28, 2017, 01:51 »
My career research assignment for my class requires me to interview a few people who works/ed at the career I want to join so I figured I would ask y'all, I would love to hear from everyone regarding of age, rate, rank,dumb,stupid,rich,broke.

[Insert name]

[Rate]
[Length of time in nuclear field (including navy)]



1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?

2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?

3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?

4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?

5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?

6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?

7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?

8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?

9. What is the most important thing in life for you?

10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?


* If there are any other notes you felt I might want to know, well you're right I would love to know *

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR TAKING TIME OUT OF YOUR DAY TO HELP A STRANGER LEARN MORE AND PREPARE FOR HIS FUTURE CAREER
« Last Edit: Nov 28, 2017, 01:57 by xblue7 »

Offline GLW

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #1 on: Nov 28, 2017, 02:22 »
1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?
•   No good answer, you have to own your decision and work with it.
2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?
•   There is nothing hard about transitioning from the USN to civilian life, anyone who finds that transition difficult should have stayed in the Navy.
3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?
•   In some regards, undefinably so, in others, not so much.
4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?
•   When I mustered out it was 1.3X the USA median, today it is north of 2.8X median, I expect to max out north of 3.3X median and then retire, these values are without overtime or bonuses or “sundries”, those "others" have kept me north of 2X median all the years of my CIVLANT and CIVPAC career
5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?
•   Nuclear?!?!?! no, too limiting,….
6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?
•   Non licensed operators make the best “bang” for the effort, licensed operators and engineers will gross more “bang” but the effort required impacts quality of life whilst the “bang” improves quality of life, when all is done, you have to own your decisions to be content
7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?
•   nothing
8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?
•   I was recruited before I EAOS’d, they who hired me literally came to talk to me and offer me a job while I was mowing my front yard
9. What is the most important thing in life for you?
•   family
10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?
•   It’s phenomenal, the USN was the easiest job I have ever had: show up on time, do as you’re told, do not leave for the day without permission to leave, and you’re good, anything you put into the USN above that only makes your stint in the USN that much better for yourself, in CIVPAC or CIVLANT that is not good enough, not nearly good enough, not even for non-licensed operators

been there, dun that,... the doormat to hell does not read "welcome", the doormat to hell reads "it's just business"

Offline MMM

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #2 on: Nov 28, 2017, 04:44 »

MM/23 years (20 navy, 3 commercial)
1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?
It depends on the person. $90000 is a lot, but you lose half to taxes, it was also only $30000 for a first reenlistment 20 years ago. There's also a hard cap on the total amount you can get for reenlistments through your career. I stayed for 20, originally because I enjoyed it, then, toward the end, for the retirement and medical benefits.
2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?
For enlisted, probably remembering to watch your language.
3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?
It depends on how you use your time in the navy.
4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?
6 figures, plus bonuses in my first job, second one is probably just shy of that, but pays more for overtime and actual raises set up.
5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?
Nope.
6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?
Probably operators, specifically non-licensed operators. Licensed ROs would probably be next, but it takes a lot more work to get there.
7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?
Nothing
8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?
2-3 months
9. What is the most important thing in life for you?
Family
10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?
Pretty big. The basic theory is the same (a pump is a pump, a breaker is a breaker, etc.), beyond that it's huge. Plus the mindset is different.

Offline Marlin

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #3 on: Nov 28, 2017, 07:28 »
My career research assignment for my class requires me to interview a few people who works/ed at the career I want to join so I figured I would ask y'all, I would love to hear from everyone regarding of age, rate, rank,dumb,stupid,rich,broke.

[Insert name]

[Rate]
[Length of time in nuclear field (including navy)]


Marlin
MM1(SS) ELT
45 years Navy/Commercial/DOE et. al.

YMMV (Your miles may Vary)

   I will not tell you that GLW and MMM are not accurate, they are, but there have been generational changes for the many Navy Nukes that have gone through the pipeline. You will need to look at the health of the nuclear industry in 6 to 10 years if nuclear is what you want. On the bright side many ex-Navy nukes did not choose nuclear when they got out, nuclear is not the only industry that recognizes the benefit of hiring a vet who met the requirements of Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program.


1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?

YMMV


2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?

Getting the smile off my face I enlisted because the draft was still in effect and I expected to be drafted.


3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?

Yes, but long term a degree is advisable.


4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?

About $8.00 an hour but that was good for 1978 and OT was overwhelming across the industry. TMI happened shortly after I got out and seismic restraints were being upgraded in all nuclear plants. Semi retired so I don't expect to do more than attend my garden.


5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?

No, got a nuclear technology degree but normally worked in positions where experience could be accepted in place of the degree. Nuclear is a much broader field than operation of a nuclear power plant.


6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?

Did not elect to get the golden handcuffs of a utility position (well 3 years but that was an aberration). Happiness was the last facility in the rear view mirror (would not recommend that in today's job market).


7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?

Did not have time I served on Fast Attack submarines.


8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?

Job found me.


9. What is the most important thing in life for you?

Family and the Navy said my wife did not come in my sea bag one to many times.


10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?

Varied but learning never stopped as I transitioned from discipline to discipline and and into different regulatory environments. NRC DOE DOT EPA etc. life of a nuclear gypsy.
« Last Edit: Nov 28, 2017, 07:32 by Marlin »

Offline fourteener

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #4 on: Nov 29, 2017, 09:06 »

Machinist Mate / 45 years


1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?   I got out after 6 because the Navy wasn't going to give me what I wanted out or life.  Also, I got stuck with a couple of poorly run commands and wanted to be able to change jobs without permission to do so.
2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?

    Finding a job.  Once that was accomplished, the rest was easy.  I will say that I spent the next 40 years trying to catch up on the sleep I missed in the Nav.


3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?
    Not really.  Nobody ever really seemed to care about my time and qaulifications from the Navy.  That is the truth.  There is a lot of commaraderie from former service members with similar training / operations experiences, but the Navy experience was not really recognized by the nuclear industry.  For example, I've seen E7 Navy Chiefs starting as equipment operators in the commercial nuclear world.


4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?
    My starting pay in the Navy was $6000/year in 1972.  My starting pay after graduating with a BS Nuclear Engineering, was $32,000/year.  I retired this year at $215,000/year as an engineer.

5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?
    Yes.  Penn State University.


6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?
    By far Engineers get the best pay for the bang.  Operators are on constant pressure to perform and work much harder than engineers.  A typical engineer can go to work, and may be able to screw off for up to a day with no consequence.  Operators can never screw off or the plant goes to crap.  The engineers progression path is also much more extensive.  Most operators get locked into the same routine for years and can't get out.  Many of the operators I've observed who progressed were washed up as operators.


7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?
    Nothing.


8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?
    I worked mostly as a contractor for my entire career.  Very lucrative.  However I spent 10 years at my last job and retired.


9. What is the most important thing in life for you?
    Family.


10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?
      None.
« Last Edit: Nov 29, 2017, 09:32 by fourteener »

Offline scotoma

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #5 on: Nov 29, 2017, 01:22 »
1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?
    It depends what you want. If you like to move around, have all your basic requirements(food & shelter & health care) provided and live your life at sea, do your 20, get your pension and lifetime benefits. You'll have reduced SS when you retire, but you will have plenty of time      for a second career. Or you can get out after 6, have your own life, and pay for all your needs. You'll have more SS when you retire, and a larger retirement account, but you won't have a military pension or benefits.
2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?
   Getting used to making decisions and not having to follow orders
3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?
    I don't know about the college thing. The navy gives you real life experience and hands on. You still have to figure out what is really relevant by yourself.
4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?
    N/A
5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?
    NO

6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?
    Engineers have a bettor deal - higher pay, more options, no shiftwork, less physically demanding work.

7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?
   I should have sucked up more and made some lucrative relationships.
8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?
   N/A. I worked for several companies as a contractor before my final job.
9. What is the most important thing in life for you?
    It changes one time. Sex, money, travel, sex, family, health.

10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?
     I don't have the mathematical formula for that, but it is a function over time.

My career research assignment for my class requires me to interview a few people who works/ed at the career I want to join so I figured I would ask y'all, I would love to hear from everyone regarding of age, rate, rank,dumb,stupid,rich,broke.


Offline spekkio

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #6 on: Dec 02, 2017, 09:58 »
Officer

Quote
1. Is 6 and out the best option, or is taking the the 90,000  the better deal, what did you choose and why?
If you are looking for a civilian career, the $90k bonus is not a good deal.  In fact, if you're looking for civilian employment, don't even go nuke. Enlist with a rate that has a 4-year contract and use the GI bill. The opportunity cost of staying in the service far outweighs the bonus, and the GI bill is worth approximately $105K, giver or take depending on BAH in your choice of school area.

Quote
2. What is the hardest part about transitioning from Military to Civilian life?

From talking to people who have transitioned and reading up on it, understanding that it is a career transition and that you are starting over. The myth that companies are going to auto-hire you into a 6-figure job because of your super-awesome nuclear power school training is largely a myth based on the numbers. The ones that do get hired into those positions already had the credentials for them prior to joining the Navy (exceptional charisma, technical education in an in-demand field, aptitude that supports excelling in a growing field with opportunity for these jobs, and in many cases willingness to travel/relocate). Also, the idea that any training you receive in the Navy is going to overcome bad grades in HS/college or bad standardized test scores when it comes to college/grad school applications is also a myth. The vast majority of companies and almost all schools will put you in the 'veteran' pile and will not distinguish you from the Army PFC signalman's resume and application right under yours.

This is easier to overcome with a post-enlistment contract because you can get out, use the GI-bill, and go into a career fresh out of school like many people do. On the officer end, being 6-8 years removed from a technical education creates challenges. This can usually be overcome by going for a master's during shore duty to refresh that skillset.

Recognize also that if you want to stay in the trades, there are civilian certifications you'll have to earn that are separate from what you did in the Navy. And companies aren't going to automatically pay you the same as someone who has 4-6 years of civilian experience. Not insurmountable, just something you'll have to work through.

Quote
3. Do you feel that having have been in the Navy for 6  years has given you a better opportunity in the job market than the kids fresh out of college?

Service can give you an edge in the job market, but it's mostly the edge that comes from "hey, this 23 year old who's held a real job for the last 4-years is not going to call in drunk every other friday and will actually perform tasks assigned to him rather than surf the internet on company time," not the "holy crap this guy has super-awesome skills that I have been dying to find in my applicant."  However, that won't overcome shortcomings like poor grades. When push comes to shove, technical industries are highly competitive, so just make sure that you have the aptitude to get good grades in whatever it is you study post-Navy.

Quote
4. What was/is your starting pay and where do you expect it to go from there?

N/A, still AD.

Quote
5. After the navy did you pursue a Nuclear Engineering degree to become an Engineer?

N/A, but I would advise against nuclear engineering. It is more difficult for a nuclear engineer to work outside nuclear power than for a non-nuclear engineer to work in nuclear power. Plus nuclear power is a shrinking industry in the U.S.

Quote
6. In your opinion do Engineers or Operators make the best bang for their work?

Engineers. Operators are on permanent shift work and don't have as much job opportunity.

Quote
7. What are some things you wish to have taken better advantage of while in the service?

The best thing I did take advantage of was getting a master's on the service's dime. For enlisted members, hands down USE THE GI BILL!!!

Quote
8. How long did your job search last until you found the company you're in?

N/A, although *the numbers* say you can expect somewhere around 6-months if you're seeking a competitive salary. It really depends on how much of a people-person you are and what connections you have. As an enlisted 6-and-out, you probably won't have many and will have to build them by using the GI bill to attend a school near the industry you'd like to enter (notice a trend?)

Quote
9. What is the most important thing in life for you?

I will also say family like many other posters, to the point that I struggle with a tough decision as I come up on 12 years. The Navy paid me over $400K in benefits to stay in past my minimum commitment, to include paying for a Master's while I collected a $90k/yr paycheck and $30k/yr bonus, and allowing me to finance my kids' college education with the GI bill. Is the 8 years away from home worth the retirement now?

Quote
10. How much learning curve is there transitioning from Navy Nuke to Civ Nuke?
N/A
« Last Edit: Dec 02, 2017, 10:03 by spekkio »

Offline Marlin

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #7 on: Dec 02, 2017, 12:12 »
Officer
If you are looking for a civilian career, the $90k bonus is not a good deal.  In fact, if you're looking for civilian employment, don't even go nuke. Enlist with a rate that has a 4-year contract and use the GI bill. The opportunity cost of staying in the service far outweighs the bonus, and the GI bill is worth approximately $105K, giver or take depending on BAH in your choice of school area.

I have not seen this recommended before but it certainly has merit.  +K 

TVA

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #8 on: Dec 02, 2017, 02:50 »
6: Stick around long enough to get an SRO License. That has trumped every degree I have ever seen. My last two job interviews lasted a total of 12 minutes.

TVA

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Re: Career Research Assignment
« Reply #9 on: Dec 02, 2017, 07:16 »
Btw money is not everything!

 


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