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Offline Rennhack

Injuries
« on: Dec 28, 2003, 05:47 »
Lessons Learned: Injuries

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« Last Edit: Jan 15, 2004, 08:57 by Rennhack »

Offline Radcat069

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #1 on: Jan 18, 2004, 02:42 »
Remember it is always easier to have someone exit through a PCM/IPM/Whatever, with a minor injury, (even if they wind up going to the hospital) than to frisk and smear the world. I'm talkin like spains, pulled muscles and such.
Also remember the more you freak out - the more the vic freaks. Stay calm, calm vic - much easier to work with.
If it's stupid and works it ain't stupid - I used a wheeled office type chair to get a dude with a foot injury out to the control point. Didn't have to wait on the strecher and then didn't have to frisk anything.
The trouble with using experience as a guide is that the final exam often comes first and then the lesson.  ~ Author Unknown

janadele821

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #2 on: Feb 02, 2004, 11:45 »
Yo!

As to your injuries... My Grandmother, from the "Old Country" said that luke-warm water keeps the pores open, but does not let ant other pollutants in. That is why we all choose to de-con with "tepid" water. Of coarse, my Grandmother also believed that bats made nests in people's hair, and actually thought that big-foot resided in the Upper-Pennesula of Michigan!

Offline Meltdown

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #3 on: Feb 04, 2004, 08:02 »
I'd agree with the PCM method as long as it doesn't cause the patient any further discomfort. Being Beta sensitive though, any dressings on a wound will shield contamination, which won't show up unless he also hits a portal monitor.

The symptoms of a sprain are identical to those of a closed fracture. It's hard to imagine manuevering through a PCM while keeping the affected limb (or back) immobilized.

I do like the out of the box thinking with the chair. Simple common sense stuff like that is all too rare.

Bottom line is first aid ALWAYS takes precedence over HP controls. Any other policy exposes you to the risk of having to explain to patient's counsel in front of the jury how, in your medical opinion, you didn't negligently aggravate his client's injury.

On the Decon - hot water usually cleans better because it breaks down fats and oils, and kills bacteria. What we typically see in a plant is small fragments of metal or oxides. I would start with the lukewarm water to remove anything still on the surface; anything remaining could be assumed to be in the pores, so the hotter stuff could be used if needed. That's why sweating is further down the list.
Meltdown

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alphadude

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #4 on: Feb 04, 2004, 08:53 »
hot water may enhance circulation in a local area thus causing pores to "close" somewhat due to increased circulation flow. keeping water temp close to body temp is the best method.  use mild castile type soaps such as ivory.  besides, its very, very lame not to do a dose assessment and avoid the decon effort to save 25mrem.  think, then act.
« Last Edit: Feb 04, 2004, 08:55 by alphadude »

moke

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #5 on: Feb 04, 2004, 12:21 »
I'd like to add the fact that we must always work at keeping our cool because our excitement can have adverse effects on the injured person and the situation at hand.

It's something most of us have to work at yet some possess inate talent.

For the sake of entities such as the utilities, an injured person that is contaminated makes for an Unusual Event thus activating various protocol that could be costly.

In one situation regarding a contaminated/injured person, we took the time to remove Anti contamination clothing while keeping the victim in good spirits and tip my hat to those involved because we could have overreacted; SONGS.

At the same time, as previously mentioned, an individuals well being is much more important and we may clean up later.

When dealing with Medical Personnel or First Responders it is always a great idea to explain existing radiological conditions in Laymans terms and something many of you now understand.

It takes practice and is ever so important. I liked the technique of High, Medium or Low as an example when questioned about the extent of skin contamination by a physician or the like.

In some cases, the dpm method just provides more confusion than it is worth and may fuel an intense situation that usually IMPACTS the VICTIM.

I believe that it is ever so important to suppress the situation by tone of voice , body language and most of all; Clear thinking that comes from PRACTICE.

Have an Awesome Week!

Moke ;D

Offline Radcat069

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #6 on: Jul 07, 2004, 07:34 »
I'd like to add the fact that we must always work at keeping our cool because our excitement can have adverse effects on the injured person and the situation at hand.

It's something most of us have to work at yet some possess inate talent.

For the sake of entities such as the utilities, an injured person that is contaminated makes for an Unusual Event thus activating various protocol that could be costly.

In one situation regarding a contaminated/injured person, we took the time to remove Anti contamination clothing while keeping the victim in good spirits and tip my hat to those involved because we could have overreacted; SONGS.

At the same time, as previously mentioned, an individuals well being is much more important and we may clean up later.

When dealing with Medical Personnel or First Responders it is always a great idea to explain existing radiological conditions in Laymans terms and something many of you now understand.

It takes practice and is ever so important. I liked the technique of High, Medium or Low as an example when questioned about the extent of skin contamination by a physician or the like.

In some cases, the dpm method just provides more confusion than it is worth and may fuel an intense situation that usually IMPACTS the VICTIM.

I believe that it is ever so important to suppress the situation by tone of voice , body language and most of all; Clear thinking that comes from PRACTICE.

Have an Awesome Week!

Moke ;D
As I said - calm tech - calm vic - much easier to work with. We all have it drilled into our heads the vic always comes first. We can decon the floor (or whatever)later,that is to say we can cure the ill or injured - but not raise the dead.
Something to keep in mind as well when decontaminating an injured person(or any frightened person for that matter) is to keep the audible feature on the frisker OFF. This can make a huge difference in the vics demeanor.
Removing PC is always preferred if practical. A caveat - don't let too much help get in the way. I once saw a decon tech about to cut out a heat stressed jumper using a razor knife. In his excitement - he had the blade pointing TOWARDS the jumper.
Needless to say a heat stressed jumper with a laid open back would have been a heck of a mess.
The trouble with using experience as a guide is that the final exam often comes first and then the lesson.  ~ Author Unknown

Dan_E.

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #7 on: Jul 07, 2004, 08:20 »
Radcat069,

Thanks and +Karma for the tip on turning off the audible when frisking out a injured or frightened person. Now I'm feeling stupid for not thinking of that and glad I haven't been there yet myself!

Offline Radcat069

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #8 on: Jul 09, 2004, 07:31 »
No such thing as stupid. If we keep this up we'll learn from each other. Karma back to you.
The trouble with using experience as a guide is that the final exam often comes first and then the lesson.  ~ Author Unknown

Surveyors_mato

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #9 on: Oct 12, 2004, 02:52 »
Old topic but not outdated. Sometimes the most important thing to keep in mind is to know when not to help. Meaning, it is possible to do more harm than good. Our best intentions could lead to life long physical problems. And yes....always stay calm in front of the vic's.

DrStrangelove

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #10 on: Jan 11, 2005, 06:31 »
I work somewhere were contaminated people is all to common. people think it is funny when they have a hand or finger that is contaminated and i survery there nose.  but about 1 in 5 is usually contaminated as well.

Offline Already Gone

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #11 on: Jan 11, 2005, 07:12 »
Aw man!  If you find a contaminated finger you're always gonna find the nose, moustache, crotch, seat-of-the-pants, or ear crapped up too.  The question that comes next is:  did they contaminate the finger first or did it come from the other part onto the finger?
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

Offline Already Gone

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #12 on: Jan 12, 2005, 06:50 »
Here's a good rule of thumb:  If it isn't glowing blue, it doesn't warrant delaying medical attention for even a second.  You have to keep the priorities straight.  Would you rather decon a hospital ER, or send them a clean corpse?

« Last Edit: Jan 12, 2005, 09:30 by Beer Court »
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

garycom

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #13 on: Jan 12, 2005, 09:22 »
Well said, Troy. I have found that with medical emergency drills, one of the most helpful aspects is having a critique afterwards with everyone involved. We have a consulting firm (RMC) monitor ours, and they always use a critique to cover what went well and what could be done better.  By reinforcing the priorities, you can be better prepared for an actual injury situation.

Offline Bingo

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Re: Injuries
« Reply #14 on: Jan 13, 2005, 06:17 »
Keeping the audio OFF is a useful technique to keep a contaminated victim calm.  It also works in reverse.  Turn your audible ON when doing general surveys.  This perks up the workers ears as you walk by a row of drums,ect.  Many times the workers forget and linger in higher dose fields.  When they hear your meter, it reminds them.
« Last Edit: Feb 28, 2005, 08:23 by RDTroja »

 


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