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Offline GNowakowski

Education: A plan IN action
« on: Feb 27, 2011, 03:59 »
I'm glad you're reading this.
Hi,

My name is Glen. I've been working with a recruiter for a couple months now. I've taken my ASVAB; and was told I qualify to apply for the Nuclear option. As of now, I'm unqualified (to even be unqualified so I have read) I've lost 24 lbs. and still have about 6lbs. left to lose. Once I hit the desired chart spot I'll sign my contract at MEPS (76"-6'4" 253 lbs. 16" Neck 42" Waist).  I'm the type that likes to have every part of my project on the table. If you are the same way, you may consider reading the end of my post first.

I've included a list of questions I was hoping that more qualified readers might help me with-they are included in list form at the bottom of this post.

For those of you who want, or need to know more about the author; we continue on. My name is Glen and I'm from Kalispell, MT. I haven't wanted to join the Navy all my life, although a large part of my family has. I initially had never noticed a program in any branch of service that was of any interest. Once I stepped into the Air Force booth at a local fair, and noticed a cryptography poster. This was very interesting (I'm from Montana...) so I read more. After learning everything the Air Force had to offer-I turned around with all intentions of never serving for the military.

Some years after high school I lost my Grandfather (Its capitalized on purpose) who did serve in the Navy. My mother seems to think he worked in the Pentagon as a Master Chief Petty Officer- So he was probably a Seaman in the Pacific. Either way, Grandpa had served me with knowledge and life that isn't given-it's found in love and work. We did a lot of work. For it, I can say that I don't fear the labor-I've come to enjoy it. I have a "chasing superman" mentality-and I didn't know where it came from for several years. I was born 06/07/87 (almost 24 for the lazy) in Sacramento Ca. I like to say its a great place to be "from" - I left before my first birthday. Montana is my home.

I saw a Navy Poster that said stuff, lots of stuff-but I saw "chasing superman" despite its copy. I had never considered Grandpa's Navy having instilled in him my favorite traits of his character. An interesting set of circumstances would occur to wake me to this consideration. In an attempt to abridge this novel, I'll explain that the Navy became appealing to my; Intellectual, Physical, Financial, and Emotional goals. My interest is in the Nuclear Submarine program. It sounds the most like a place to push the edge. It sounds like home.

I will not sacrifice my Education. I have wanted an education my entire life, and this year I earned scholarships and was awarded enough financial aid to pay for me to go to Montana State University in Bozeman MT. Even with this on the shelf (I continue the paperwork despite my activities just in case) I want the Navy more. I don't think I need to explain-not here.

I love that the Navy can help me get a BETTER education. I want to know the stream-lined way to get through the pipeline and into a degree. The Navy College Program offers several interesting programs of which I have major interest. I am now trying to organize my thoughts so that upon entry (I should sign late March) I have a plan. My sincerest desire here is; allowing myself to focus for the first two years, repay the navy while I earn my bachelors degree, and making ready to gain my masters degree.

I have heard of STA-21/NUPOC/Etc. and I have read quite a lot about it. It certainly seems of interest to me, but it is secondary to my education. If it can help me with my goals, I would love to serve to the max. However I don't know where it should fit organizationally, and it's much too far away to focus on.

QUESTIONS

Does anyone have a good thread id or any experience on the Old Dominion NCPACE program? (General Engineering: Mechanical Engineering Management Major/Minor) ?
Especially - Any experience with its practicality on board a Submarine

Does anyone have a good thread id or any experience on the Thomas Edison State College NCPACE program?
(Applied Science: Nuclear Engineering Technology)
Especially - Any experience with its practicality on board a Submarine


I would really enjoy a degree in Mathematics Esp. Applied Mathematics or Mathematics and Computer Science interdiscplinary
I have found a limited number of schools offering these degrees in ACE accredited schools (or otherwise transferable credits) however I would like to find one which is Submarine Friendly - Can I get the degree while underway? - Esp. NCPACE friendly.


With allPrograms I have full intention of following with a subsequent Masters program.

Please Note: Im not looking for Basic PDF's or Easy to find Web Info - I've already made Google bleed.
Any valuable information to which I may have forgotten to enquire is still welcome.
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2011, 06:01 by GNowakowski »

Offline Gamecock

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #1 on: Feb 27, 2011, 04:29 »
During your first enlistment, you will not have time to pursue a degree.  You can read more about your first enlistment on here if you search.

If you want a college education, take your scholarships and financial aid and go to Montana State.  Work hard, get good grades, then apply to a top tier graduate school.

If you want to serve your country then join the nuclear navy.  You'll learn the work ethic that your Grandfather had and after six years of service, you can go to college better prepared.

Cheers,
GC
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2011, 04:31 by Gamecock »
“If the thought police come... we will meet them at the door, respectfully, unflinchingly, willing to die... holding a copy of the sacred Scriptures in one hand and the US Constitution in the other."

drayer54

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #2 on: Feb 27, 2011, 06:32 »
I'm glad you're reading this.
Hi,

My name is Glen. I've been working with a recruiter for a couple months now. I've taken my ASVAB; and was told I qualify to apply for the Nuclear option. As of now, I'm unqualified (to even be unqualified so I have read) I've lost 24 lbs. and still have about 6lbs. left to lose. Once I hit the desired chart spot I'll sign my contract at MEPS (76"-6'4" 253 lbs. 16" Neck 42" Waist).  I'm the type that likes to have every part of my project on the table. If you are the same way, you may consider reading the end of my post first.

[. [/i]

Glen,
I read your post in its entirety and think that I may be able to give you some more information that could help make this decision easier or more informed.
I was in a very similar position to this about 6 or so years ago and decided due to the foreseen financial struggle for the little stuff during college to join the Nuclear Navy. I think that your reasons are great and your intentions are great but you need to know what it is that you are potentially signing up for. You must understand that there are no guarantees for the submarine service. You could end up on a carrier due to needs of the navy despite being a sub vol from day 1. I was a carrier nuke and have found that the experiences are different but the job is pretty well the same. I have not seen or heard of anyone finishing a degree in their first enlistment. I was by far the most aggressive person that I have ever seen or heard of in a first tour getting classes done. I took about 10 NCPACE courses and 8 Cleps on board the Eisenhower during my 4 and a half years there. That was difficult and required the support of my peers to help me manage the schedule. It also took understanding superiors, which are not a guarantee. Taking classes is without question easier on a carrier due to the obvious size and capability differences. I am not trying to persuade you to the surface force, only understand your choices better. Nuclear Power School is a great school and an amazing opportunity. Graduating from there is one of my proudest moments and will surely help me in the future. However, people are not as changed or shaped as much civilians seem to think they are by the program, especially the nuke program. As Nukes, we have a different mentality and seem to be less military minded than the rest. People who enter with work ethic leave with it and those without it tend to leave the same. During the time that you are on the boat you will be working a rigorous schedule and will be doing a job that is far from glamorous. It can be dirty, undesirable, and entirely unrewarding at times (a lot)... This is a complete 180 from the college route that you are considering, but it is a chance to get out and see a world you probably haven't seen outside of Montana. I would be skeptical of the Thomas Edison program due to the lack of accreditation. You will be given credit for about 40ish credits in most mechanical engineering programs as an MM and could use the Nuclear Engineering Technology Degrees as a stairway to a masters degree. Me personally, I am about done with the BSNET (Excelsior) and going to be starting my Graduate program with Southern Methodist next spring. It is possible, but I had to extend my time to shore duty and am fortunate to have a job now that allows me time to work on this degree. Most on shore duty are on a crap shift work schedule that isn't too easy to work with. Also, and this is the big one. I am a big guy too and let me tell you that this job is not big guy friendly. We have to do the physical tests every 6 months and the rope and choke test your recruiter is giving you will not go away. The NAV seems to be moving in the tighter direction with these stupid tests and using them to separate sailors constantly. You will likely lose weight in boot camp, but as the years go on and you start putting it back these tests could become stressful to you and potentially end your career. Every command in the navy uses the same instruction but applies it in a new way everywhere you go so be careful of setting yourself up for weight issues. I myself am on the fence and could be separated (so tempting!) if I push my gut out this May. I have to work to stay in these standards and it isn't easy for everyone. You have a lot to consider, but remember once you sign those papers, it will be out of your control in many ways. You could want to be a submarine mechanic and end up a surface ET without any say in the matter.  I don't want you to join for this poster vision that you have and find yourself disappointed with many years to go. Some people love it and others can tell you how many seconds they have left at any point in time. Be realistic with your expectations and remember the Navy isn't here for you or me, it's here for a purpose.This is my take and others may vary. Get what you can out of it and good luck with your decisions.

Derek

Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #3 on: Feb 27, 2011, 06:58 »
I appreciate your replies.

I can see my mistake and I apologize for not clarifying. I'm not the type making a decision from a poster. I used this as a metaphor for discovery. I must add that I have no intentions of enlisting for six years. I'm the type that left home before I was eighteen, I'm twenty-four now. I've had two house fires, lost all of my materials...Yes, Twice. Not a pitty me party here - I'm not having Poster Vision - Its Tunnel Vision.

I want a career that includes servitude - How long to make the degree possible is a question that will be answered in between contracts. I'm an electrician out here in civilian land. I'm 24, not 18. It took some scratch just being where I'm being - gigs up I want more.  

What I'm looking for is information on the programs.  I love the information you provided to me Derek.  I thank you very much.  Gamecock, also I want to thank you for your accuracy.  

Is there difficulty in qualifying for NPACE classes?  Any information on anything Old Dominion?
Furthermore my previous questions on the programs stand.  (Although much better understood thanks to the aforementioned)

Note to Derek:  Your in shoes I'd gladly fill - Sub or not, I'd serve.
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2011, 07:36 by GNowakowski »

Offline Gamecock

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #4 on: Feb 27, 2011, 07:39 »
I must add that I have no intentions of enlisting for six years.

Nuke is 6 year enlistment...non-negotiable.
“If the thought police come... we will meet them at the door, respectfully, unflinchingly, willing to die... holding a copy of the sacred Scriptures in one hand and the US Constitution in the other."

Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #5 on: Feb 27, 2011, 07:41 »
Nuke is 6 year enlistment...non-negotiable.

Longer Gamecock.  Not shorter.
I plan on making it a career.

How long to make the degree possible is a question that will be answered in between contracts.
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2011, 07:59 by GNowakowski »

drayer54

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #6 on: Feb 27, 2011, 08:04 »
I appreciate your replies.

I can see my mistake and I apologize for not clarifying. I'm not the type making a decision from a poster. I used this as a metaphor for discovery. I must add that I have no intentions of enlisting for six years. I'm the type that left home before I was eighteen, I'm twenty-four now. I've had two house fires, lost all of my materials...Yes, Twice. Not a pitty me party here - I'm not having Poster Vision - Its Tunnel Vision.

I want a career that includes servitude - How long to make the degree possible is a question that will be answered in between contracts. I'm an electrician out here in civilian land. I'm 24, not 18. It took some scratch just being where I'm being - gigs up I want more. 

What I'm looking for is information on the programs.  I love the information you provided to me Derek.  I thank you very much.  Gamecock, also I want to thank you for your accuracy. 

Is there difficulty in qualifying for NPACE classes?  Any information on anything Old Dominion?
Furthermore my previous questions on the programs stand.  (Although much better understood thanks to the aforementioned)

Note to Derek:  Your in shoes I'd gladly fill - Sub or not, I'd serve.

No problem Glen. Ask away anytime, I don’t work much these days. As for NCPACE, I don’t know what you mean by qualify. We simply just signed up for these classes and then we took them. They may make you take a placement test for Math and English to make sure that you are ready, but
we always just signed up for them when they did sign ups. They were also taught at the BM level of intelligence and incredibly easy.They are also free to active duty. The ships do not offer CLEPS or Dante’s anymore though so they would have to be taken at a shore facility. I wouldn’t make up your mind on a career until you get waist deep with your division while doing your job. I would just say to keep an open mind and do what feels right. I don’t know exactly how they do classes on the boats, but they offered a wide variety on the carrier. You seem to have your head in the right place and good luck to you.




Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #7 on: Feb 28, 2011, 01:39 »
Thanks Derek,

I once again appreciate your response - and a speedy reply! I am currently under the impression that the NCPACE classes are offered from several schools. Were the classes offered to be signed up for by the Navy, or by your school?
The link below is the NCPACE catalog document:

http://www.ctcd.edu/navy/ncpace_guide_catalog.pdf  P[125,127]

The catalog includes information on quite a few NCPACE programs. My interest is in the Old Dominion program. Qauntitive information is supplied on page one hundred twenty five (concerning aforementioned). The degree of interest (General Engineering Technology: BSET) is detailed on page one hundred twenty seven.

This document makes it appear as though you would need to be accepted by the school, and have already negotiated transfer credits in order to begin the program.

Perhaps a good question here is what to expect from a NCPACE CD-ROM. How difficult is it to get them for your class(courses available as per catalag)-and how do you manage yourself and the contents?

Offline cheme09

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #8 on: Feb 28, 2011, 02:19 »
Your enthusiasm and willingness to do your own research commendable.

Just wondering, if education is your top priority, why not focus more on making that happen first?  Then decide on serving after you finish your degree.  You could also look into the different naval opportunities that either supply you with a scholarship (ROTC) or pay you to go to school (NUPOC or BDCP if you decide you're open to non-nuclear designators).  With the second option, since you already have other scholarships, it'd be pretty much just money in your pocket.

Also, why do you say the navy will help you get "a BETTER education"?

I share the same sentiments as GC, but take a look at it another step further.

If your end goal is to earn a college degree so that you can use that education in a career or to do research in your field, then go to school.  Conversely, if you want your career to be the navy and the idea of getting your college degree is more or less just a bullet point on your bucket list of life, then go ahead and sign up.  The navy will provide you with the tools and opportunities to successfully earn a college degree.

 

Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #9 on: Feb 28, 2011, 06:02 »
1.0 To begin I'd like to thank you for your reply.
Also I thank you for your very direct questions; they inspire very accurate introspection. I appreciate the collected thoughts here.

1.1 My expectation from my "education" is very high. Like many "nuke type minds" (as stereotypical as possible..) I enjoy Engineering - be that Chemical, Electrical, Mechanical or Aerospace. I also love Physics. All of these studies are limited tangibles and thus understanding them takes very dedicated study-with long term discipline. The primary focus for an individual possessing such a desire is to surround oneself with resources which facilitate an admirable education.

2.0 That is the fluffed up junk - albeit an honest protractor.

2.1 The black and white is a comparison in funding. I can get myself through school at Montana State and owe nothing-but will have a limited education. The mathematics program at MSU (Montana State University herein) is not fully appealing. It does not have an applied degree of interest, and outside of the education field, it is limited in its opportunity creation.

2.2 The most respected program of MSU is its emerging engineering faculty. However its research is very limited, it is a new department-and is fostered by wind power in the state. Furthermore as an agricultural state-and harboring a phenomenal microbiological surrounding (Yellowstone Park's geysers and biological interests lie just outside of the university) the engineering program focuses on Biochemistry and Microbiology far too heavily for my interest.

if education is your top priority, why not focus more on making that happen first?

2.3 Limited research, limited opportunity, limited educational value, limited communal or social progression (it's a very small school), all produce an environment which is lacking. I'm also aware that this option will not disappear-I cannot get to old for it. However, I'm already pushing the age of needing a waiver to enter the Navy. If I want to serve (and I do) the clock is ticking out.

2.4 I just don't feel that schooling and Navy need to be separated. I certainly understand while I'm unqualified (3+ years?) that schooling is not a viable option. After that-I'm hoping its more viable? This is my mindset-and what leads me to ask the aforementioned questions for the programs on board the Subs.

The navy will provide you with the tools and opportunities to successfully earn a college degree.
I'm glad to hear that. How can I best put these tools to use while I'm in the Navy, and after I'm out? -are there programs which are more streamlined for on board completion?

3.0 My expectations:

3.1 Learn how to schedule my day-or better FOLLOW said schedule
3.2 Learn and work on a team environment (one that actually has to care....at least somewhat)
3.3 Learn and experience a valuable trade
3.4 Develop and progress my work ethic
3.5 Remove financial detractors from University possibilities via (GI BILL+TA+NCPACE+STA-21 etc.)

(NUPOC or BDCP if you decide you're open to non-nuclear designators)
Assumed Reference:
NROTC or doing BDCP/NUPOC (they are the same program essentially, but the application process is slightly different... NUPOC is for nukes specifically, while BDCP is offered for various other designators). BDCP or NUPOC are the best deals in the Navy...collect E3 (BDCP) or E6 (NUPOC) salary + BAH for up to two years while attending school and having no military responsibility aside from keeping up your grades and keeping your nose clean. Oh, and the time counts as active duty time toward pay. They are very competitive programs, though, so like I said...get A's.
As quoted from: http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,22571.0.html

I do want an education. I will get an education. Its just going to happen-because I want it to damn bad to fail. Being an officer isn't of any great desire to me at the moment. I want to serve, and I want a degree. Beyond that is too cloudy for me to plan.

Once again I do appreciate the previous responses.  Thank you for reading through to this point-I hope this remains readable and that its references are useful to other readers as well.
« Last Edit: Feb 28, 2011, 06:27 by GNowakowski »

Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #10 on: Feb 28, 2011, 08:02 »
My favorite Documents and Places:

I realized that many ideas, and thoughts in this thread were beginning to be developed with little reference. This is a list of useful information.

NCPACE

http://www.dlncpace.com/
NCPACE Home
http://www.dlncpace.com/catalog.cfm
Complete NCPACE Catalog
http://www.dlncpace.com/PartnersList.cfm
NCPACE School list (Providers of NCPACE courses)
http://www.ctcd.edu/navy/ncpace_guide_catalog.pdf
NCPACE Program guide catalog (Hosted by Central Texas)
http://www.ctcd.edu/navy/pro_info.html
NCPACE Program Information (Hosted by Central Texas)

Empire State College


http://www.esc.edu/navy
Empire State College Navy Home Page
http://www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/cdl/cdl.nsf/wholeshortlinks2/Distance+Learning+Catalog?opendocument
Empire State College Learning Catalog with term segments and courses
http://www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/cdl/navycoll.nsf/wholeshortlinks2/NCPDLP+Degrees
NCPDLP Approved Degrees
http://www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/cdl/navycoll.nsf/8fa4c6c0069894608525671d0049f3a0/ac6cfede7cc6ffc1852569a8006ab40d/$FILE/BS%20SMT%20Information%20Systems.pdf
The only Mathematics (Applied Mathematics) degree available through the NCPDLP

Old Dominion

http://dl.odu.edu/military/navycollege/
Old Dominion Navy College partnership program
http://dl.odu.edu/database.php?todo=program&id=22
General Engineering Technology - Electromechanical Systems (BSET)
http://dl.odu.edu/database.php?todo=program&id=26
Mechanical Engineering Technology - Nuclear Engr Technology (BSET)

ECPI

http://militarydegrees.net/programs/dlp/index.cfm
ECPI NCPACE Program Overview
http://militarydegrees.net/programs/dlp/degree.cfm
ECPI Degree program

Coastline Community College (CCC)

http://military.coastline.edu/ncpace.htm
CCC. NCPACE Program Overview


University of Oklahoma

http://cidl.ou.edu/independentstudy.cfm
Independent Study College Courses at UO
http://cidl.ou.edu/semester/index.cfm
Outreach Flex College Courses at UO (Count towards Residency)
 

Dallas Community College

http://military.dcccd.edu/navy.html
Dallas Community Navy home

Thomas Edison State College


http://www.tesc.edu/6345.php
TESC Navy partnership
http://www.tesc.edu/6404.php
TESC NCPACE Program Home
http://www.tesc.edu/6384.php
TESC Transferrable Credit information
http://www.tesc.edu/1011.php
TESC Ratings Roadmap

Excelsior College

http://www.excelsior.edu/courses
Courses available (Military Friendly)
http://www.excelsior.edu/ecapps/CourseSearch/CourseSections.jsf
List of Technology Courses and Programs


Vincennes University


http://www.vinu.edu/cms/opencms/future_students/military/on_site_programs/degree_and_cert.html
Degree Programs at Vincennes
http://www.vinu.edu/cms/opencms/future_students/military/vu_plus/navy.html
Vincennes University Course offerings via a Free laptop? - Thats what they say...?
 

Roadmap for Ratings

https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/rates/rates.cfm?rate=MM%28SUB%29
MM(SUB)
https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/rates/rates.cfm?rate=MM
MM
https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/rates/rates.cfm?rate=EM
EM
https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/rates/rates.cfm?rate=ET
ET

 
« Last Edit: Feb 28, 2011, 08:29 by GNowakowski »

drayer54

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #11 on: Feb 28, 2011, 10:39 »
Thanks Derek,

I once again appreciate your response - and a speedy reply! I am currently under the impression that the NCPACE classes are offered from several schools. Were the classes offered to be signed up for by the Navy, or by your school?
The link below is the NCPACE catalog document:

http://www.ctcd.edu/navy/ncpace_guide_catalog.pdf  P[125,127]

The catalog includes information on quite a few NCPACE programs. My interest is in the Old Dominion program. Qauntitive information is supplied on page one hundred twenty five (concerning aforementioned). The degree of interest (General Engineering Technology: BSET) is detailed on page one hundred twenty seven.

This document makes it appear as though you would need to be accepted by the school, and have already negotiated transfer credits in order to begin the program.

Perhaps a good question here is what to expect from a NCPACE CD-ROM. How difficult is it to get them for your class(courses available as per catalag)-and how do you manage yourself and the contents?


You are beating a horse beyond belief here buddy. You will take the classes that the ships Educational Service Offer decides to offer based interest, meaning elementry addition for most topsiders. You do not need an application or anything other than the know how to navigate those awful spaces above the hangar bay that tend to scare or frighten nukes like uncharted territory. The classes will be offered by Central Texas College until their contract with the nav expires($$$). I spent time with the ODU people inquiring about this degree for nukes and came to the conclusion that you must finish x classes and an application. Doing this degree with them is like any degree with any college. You would be accepted and then have a plan with an academic adviser. There is no NCPACE with ODU, get that out of the noggin. They will give you a degree plan with an idea of what classes you need and which ones will work. They even tell you on the website which classes will work. It is something that you will worry about years from now after you finish the training commands and what not. This could change between now and then and you got 5 million other things to and and wonder about before all of this matters. Io am glad to see this is a priority so don't take that wrong.

MacGyver

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Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #12 on: Feb 28, 2011, 10:55 »
I'm glad you're reading this.
Hi,

My name is Glen. I've been working with a recruiter for a couple months now. I've taken my ASVAB; and was told I qualify to apply for the Nuclear option. As of now, I'm unqualified (to even be unqualified so I have read) I've lost 24 lbs. and still have about 6lbs. left to lose. Once I hit the desired chart spot I'll sign my contract at MEPS (76"-6'4" 253 lbs. 16" Neck 42" Waist).  I'm the type that likes to have every part of my project on the table. If you are the same way, you may consider reading the end of my post first.

I've included a list of questions I was hoping that more qualified readers might help me with-they are included in list form at the bottom of this post.

For those of you who want, or need to know more about the author; we continue on. My name is Glen and I'm from Kalispell, MT. I haven't wanted to join the Navy all my life, although a large part of my family has. I initially had never noticed a program in any branch of service that was of any interest. Once I stepped into the Air Force booth at a local fair, and noticed a cryptography poster. This was very interesting (I'm from Montana...) so I read more. After learning everything the Air Force had to offer-I turned around with all intentions of never serving for the military.

Some years after high school I lost my Grandfather (Its capitalized on purpose) who did serve in the Navy. My mother seems to think he worked in the Pentagon as a Master Chief Petty Officer- So he was probably a Seaman in the Pacific. Either way, Grandpa had served me with knowledge and life that isn't given-it's found in love and work. We did a lot of work. For it, I can say that I don't fear the labor-I've come to enjoy it. I have a "chasing superman" mentality-and I didn't know where it came from for several years. I was born 06/07/87 (almost 24 for the lazy) in Sacramento Ca. I like to say its a great place to be "from" - I left before my first birthday. Montana is my home.

I saw a Navy Poster that said stuff, lots of stuff-but I saw "chasing superman" despite its copy. I had never considered Grandpa's Navy having instilled in him my favorite traits of his character. An interesting set of circumstances would occur to wake me to this consideration. In an attempt to abridge this novel, I'll explain that the Navy became appealing to my; Intellectual, Physical, Financial, and Emotional goals. My interest is in the Nuclear Submarine program. It sounds the most like a place to push the edge. It sounds like home.


I will not sacrifice my Education. I have wanted an education my entire life, and this year I earned scholarships and was awarded enough financial aid to pay for me to go to Montana State University in Bozeman MT. Even with this on the shelf (I continue the paperwork despite my activities just in case) I want the Navy more. I don't think I need to explain-not here.

I love that the Navy can help me get a BETTER education. I want to know the stream-lined way to get through the pipeline and into a degree. The Navy College Program offers several interesting programs of which I have major interest. I am now trying to organize my thoughts so that upon entry (I should sign late March) I have a plan. My sincerest desire here is; allowing myself to focus for the first two years, repay the navy while I earn my bachelors degree, and making ready to gain my masters degree.

I have heard of STA-21/NUPOC/Etc. and I have read quite a lot about it. It certainly seems of interest to me, but it is secondary to my education. If it can help me with my goals, I would love to serve to the max. However I don't know where it should fit organizationally, and it's much too far away to focus on.

QUESTIONS

Does anyone have a good thread id or any experience on the Old Dominion NCPACE program? (General Engineering: Mechanical Engineering Management Major/Minor) ?
Especially - Any experience with its practicality on board a Submarine

Does anyone have a good thread id or any experience on the Thomas Edison State College NCPACE program?
(Applied Science: Nuclear Engineering Technology)
Especially - Any experience with its practicality on board a Submarine


I would really enjoy a degree in Mathematics Esp. Applied Mathematics or Mathematics and Computer Science interdiscplinary
I have found a limited number of schools offering these degrees in ACE accredited schools (or otherwise transferable credits) however I would like to find one which is Submarine Friendly - Can I get the degree while underway? - Esp. NCPACE friendly.


With allPrograms I have full intention of following with a subsequent Masters program.

Please Note: Im not looking for Basic PDF's or Easy to find Web Info - I've already made Google bleed.
Any valuable information to which I may have forgotten to enquire is still welcome.


Let me make my point first with a picture.



Now ask yourself which is more important, like right now important.  We did it the hard way too.  We are trying to save you the same experience.  I recommend you learn from our mistakes so that you don't have to repeat them.  Or, you could just ignore our advice.

GO TO COLLEGE, or don't.

Because if you choose to go to the Navy (re: enlisted nuclear navy) to get an education (e.g. college) then you are making a big mistake.




drayer54

  • Guest
Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #13 on: Feb 28, 2011, 11:43 »
Let me make my point first with a picture.

[Now ask yourself which is more important, like right now important.  We did it the hard way too.  We are trying to save you the same experience.  I recommend you learn from our mistakes so that you don't have to repeat them.  Or, you could just ignore our advice.

GO TO COLLEGE, or don't.

Because if you choose to go to the Navy (re: enlisted nuclear navy) to get an education (e.g. college) then you are making a big mistake.





excellent usage of picture to make a point. I agree to a point. I would say go for school if you can't afford it. If you can afford it then go to school. I think you know what to do, but college doesn't need to be the focus until you hit the fleet. One you hit the boat, get to work. I almost got the membership just to give karma for that post....
« Last Edit: Mar 02, 2011, 08:14 by drayer54 »

Offline wokrdan

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #14 on: Mar 01, 2011, 02:18 »
You really need to look at the possible paths you can take:
1. Enlist for 6 as a nuke- Do this and you'll knock out a lot of credits for a Thomas Edison or Excelsior degree, but you're gonna have to stick it out for at least another 2 years as a staff pick up or go back to a shore command to finish before you get out. RPI used to be available for NY, but they japped out on that deal. As far as college on the boat, some schools won't accept DANTES or CLEP tests, and you can forget about even trying to take online classes unless you're on a pre-comm, decomm, or RCOH. On a better note, you're a shoe-in for STA-21 nuke option, if you bust your balls in A-School and NPS, but even that's not guaranteed. You'll also have your G.I. Bill for after you get out. As far as civilian plants, it depends on the plant and how bad they're hurting for manning. Usually, they want the people with experience and supervisory skills, and you need more than 6 years to get to that point.
2. Go to college and then to OCS- More money as an officer and retirement after 20, but if you're sure you want to serve, you might want to get a ROTC scholarship to pay for the college. Officer bonuses are nice, but still not worth the headaches. You'll still get stepped on, just now by commanders and captains.
3. Naval Academy- Don't be that guy.
4. Enlist as a non-nuke rating for 3-4 years. You'll knock out your commitment and get your G.I. Bill, which is really all you need if you're not doing 20. This way, you're not stuck in something you really regret doing, and you're still young enough to finish school (for free) and establish yourself in a career, and get paid roughly the same as a nuke with 8 years and no degree.

All in all, if you're in it for the money, go officer. If you want hands on experience and actually operate, go enlisted. In the long run, if you do 6 or 8-and-out, and go work at a civilian plant, you'll make more money in the long run (even with that nice little retirement check as a master chief), not to mention, the peace of mind knowing that if you don't like working at a particular plant, or in nuclear power for that matter, you can go work somewhere else anytime YOU want to.

Offline GNowakowski

Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #15 on: Mar 02, 2011, 05:44 »
WOW!

Thank you for all the replies.  ESPECIALLY the hat picture... That picture was worth 1 million words.
Kudos for that.  

That's like a wake-up-call with a 35 lb. fresh herring to the schnozz!


After reading that, and reading more posts like it.  I can see that planning on an education in exchange for
a tour in the Nuclear Navy - is a difficult exchange.  

Again, thank you for your replies!  Very illuminating!





...That said,  

I still want to serve.  (I'll be waying options 1. and 4. very heavily wokrdan)

« Last Edit: Mar 02, 2011, 05:50 by GNowakowski »

andrewnavy

  • Guest
Re: Education: A plan IN action
« Reply #16 on: Mar 03, 2011, 04:05 »
Go to college! 

The only way you will get classes done on a fast attack submarine (SSN) is completely reliant on others (IE the pace coordinator).  That being said, it is highly unlikely that you will finish a degree while on sea duty.  The only time they did ncpace courses on my boat was during deployments and we only had two.  My boat would also only let you sign up for one class at a time to begin with.  That being said you will find it extremely difficult to take classes on a SSN.  Even if you are in port in the ship yard and you manage to take classes, it will most likely bag your coworkers.  They will have to be willing to cover your slack and you will have to manage it with a 3 to 4 section duty rotation.  It also sounds as if you are in love with the idea of the "kumbaya" philosophical learning experience that colleges provide.  That is completely fine but you will not get that out of a ncpace course.  You will be up in your sleep time doing assignments and probably not getting that much out of it and it will be second to your real job.  If you fail it then you will pay for it and then it will forever devastate your g.p.a..  You can get your degree done on shore duty but then again you are subjected to the local colleges that you live around unless you want to do online classes.  Good luck and have fun in the fleet :P

andrewnavy

 


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