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ZSchill-Berry

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NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« on: Mar 09, 2011, 10:12 »
Hey I have to take the NAPT test for the navy to get into the Nuke program and my recruiter told me i needed a minimum of a 55 on the test because thats the newest requirment for anyone that takes the NAPT. So i was just wondering if there are any study guides or practice tests for the NAPT?

MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #1 on: Mar 09, 2011, 10:31 »
Hey I have to take the NAPT test for the navy to get into the Nuke program and my recruiter told me i needed a minimum of a 55 on the test because thats the newest requirment for anyone that takes the NAPT. So i was just wondering if there are any study guides or practice tests for the NAPT?

Cheat much?  {Then type in NAPT.}  You get search results like this.  Which should be removed by moderators.  It's supposed to be a surprise for a reason.  And here are some reasons why.

It is an aptitude / placement test.  Why are you worried / concerned about an assessment of your current (or retained) knowledge?

And for the life of me did you read this before posting?  Did you know it is required before posting?  BTW the correct forum can be found here.

Just saying ... you have the following statistics:

General Statistics - ZSchill-Berry
Total Time Spent Online: 17 minutes.
Total Posts: 1 posts
Total Topics Started: 1 topics
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Edit to add an additional link on the NAPT and its classified nature.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 02:37 by MacGyver »

Offline Gamecock

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #2 on: Mar 09, 2011, 11:12 »
You get search results like this.  Which should be removed by moderators. 

Done. 
“If the thought police come... we will meet them at the door, respectfully, unflinchingly, willing to die... holding a copy of the sacred Scriptures in one hand and the US Constitution in the other."

ZSchill-Berry

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #3 on: Mar 09, 2011, 06:11 »
I was told by my recruiter to look for a study guide or practice test or something that told you what you needed to know / study for the napt... so I was only doing as I was suggested sorry..

Offline HydroDave63

Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #4 on: Mar 09, 2011, 07:47 »
Unfortunate it is that your recruiter tossed you out to fend for yourself and did not provide said "study guide or practice test or something that told you what you needed to know / study for the napt".

If there is any such thing endorsed by the US Navy your recruiter should know what it is.

Indeed. A recruiter being THIS much of a lazy used colostomy bag should be recycled out to sea.

Offline Styrofoam

Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #5 on: Mar 10, 2011, 12:38 »
When I asked my recruiter about study materials for the NAPT, she told me to go to Nukeworker.com!


MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #6 on: Mar 10, 2011, 07:28 »
I was told by my recruiter to look for a study guide or practice test or something that told you what you needed to know / study for the napt... so I was only doing as I was suggested sorry..


Arrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggggggg gggggggggggghhhhhh ... {geeeeez} for the love of humanity!   ;)

You should not be sorry.  Right now all you have is your recruiter.  (S)He is probably not a nuke.  (S)He then, therefore, is zero help other than send you on his (/her) dirty work.

If you must know (s)he (i.e. your recruiter) has never lived the Navy Nuclear tradiation.  We value integrity.  (S)He doesn't obviously.  "(S)HE" would send you on an errand to short the hard work someone put into the selection test.  Which Marssim made mention of so much better than I could ever do.  I'll leave his explanation to satisfy your young efforts.

My point was you are smart enough to be offered a navy nuke position.  Smart enough to follow instructions (e.g. your above post).  Smart enough to register and log-on to NukeWorker.  But, not smart enough to follow some simple instructions that we posted for your and our benefit?  I think you were just plain lazy.  Looking for the easy answer.  Well I recommend you stop looking for others to spoon-feed you.  And, start learning to feed yourself.

When I asked my recruiter about study materials for the NAPT, she told me to go to Nukeworker.com!



And, it should stop immediately.  Your recruiter is wrong to ask you to do such a thing.  The test / assessment was meant to be a guage of your current knowledge.  Not your ability to re-learn things you should already know.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 08:45 by MacGyver »

ZSchill-Berry

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #7 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:05 »
Well everyone that has replied to this, I will just go into the NAPT testing without studying or re-learning any of the information, but my biggest problem is, my high school does not offer, trig, calc, or physics which I have been told are decent sized parts on the NAPT hence the reason I was looking for something to study/learn off of. I will try my best taking this test when my recruiter sets a date and time for me to do it. Also my recruiter is a Heli Mechanic so he hasn't had any exposure to the Nuke program to my knowledge. The only thing he knew for a fact without having to look it up was that because I didn't auto qualify for the nuke program, I had to score a minimum of a 55 on the NAPT. For all I know I might not even make it into the Navy depending on if I get my waiver or not.

MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #8 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:16 »
Well everyone that has replied to this, I will just go into the NAPT testing without studying or re-learning any of the information, but my biggest problem is, my high school does not offer, trig, calc, or physics which I have been told are decent sized parts on the NAPT hence the reason I was looking for something to study/learn off of. I will try my best taking this test when my recruiter sets a date and time for me to do it. Also my recruiter is a Heli Mechanic so he hasn't had any exposure to the Nuke program to my knowledge. The only thing he knew for a fact without having to look it up was that because I didn't auto qualify for the nuke program, I had to score a minimum of a 55 on the NAPT. For all I know I might not even make it into the Navy depending on if I get my waiver or not.

In the old'en days everyone took it.  I took it without any knowledge of what was on the test, like everyone else in those days (i.e. pre-internet). 

My recruiter was not a navy nuke and my HS didn't offer those classes either.  Though I did have trig in HS prior to the test.  Even so I still almost aced it.  60 questions took me less than 10 minutes with a double check of questions and answers.

Don't sweat it.  Get a good nights rest and a good breakfast before the test.




For your information, the hardest physics on the test I can recall:

Question
A gun fires a bullet at the exact moment you drop a bullet from the same height.  Which bullet hits the ground first?

Answers
1. The bullet fired from the gun
2. The bullet dropped from the fired gun barrel height
3. Both hit the ground at the same time











Answer 3
I give you this example since it is no longer in circulation and it should steady your mind about taking the test cold.  Like it is supposed to be taken.  Anyone that offers you advice on the test should be ignored for the sake of your integrity.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 11:00 by MacGyver »

ZSchill-Berry

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #9 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:25 »
Don't sweat it.  Get a good nights rest and a good breakfast before the test.

So you understand the hardest physics on the test I can recall:

Question
A gun fires a bullet at the exact moment you drop a bullet from the same height.  Which one hits the ground first?

Answers
1. The bullet fired from the gun
2. The bullet dropped from the fired gun barrel height
3. Both hit the ground at the same time











Answer 3

I give you this example since it is no longer in circulation and it should steady your mind about taking the test cold.  Like it is supposed to be taken.  Anyone that offers you advice on the test should be ignored for the sake of your integrity.

So it's not as difficult as people have made it sound. Because i know my first time at MEPS, the other recruiter in my Navy recruiting office was there because there was a 18/19 year old male taking the NAPT and he said that it was semi difficult so that was my main reason for wanting to be a little more prepared but i guess it'll be easier to go into with a clear mind and not try to remember things i have studied for the test.. Thanks i appreciate it. So it's more of a basic understanding of everything instead of a deep thorough complex test on everythin g.

MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #10 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:57 »
But wait a minute,...

What is the geoid height?

What is the rifling on the gun?

What is the muzzle velocity of the fired bullet?

And that is how you fail the NAPT,.... :P ;) :) 8)

Marssim you are correct.  That is, exactly, how they fail the test.

« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 11:00 by MacGyver »

ZSchill-Berry

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #11 on: Mar 10, 2011, 01:34 »
And do you need to know that kind of stuff?

MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #12 on: Mar 10, 2011, 01:43 »
And do you need to know that kind of stuff?

NO!

Don't worry about:

But wait a minute,...

What is the geoid height?

What is the rifling on the gun?

What is the muzzle velocity of the fired bullet?

And that is how you fail the NAPT,.... :P ;) :) 8)

We were just showing how people fail this test.  They over think it.

Listen, it's a test of concepts.  IIIRC (i.e. If I recall correctly).  If you feel like you don't have enough information then you are over thinking it.

As long as you did not see stuff like this:

on your way to "school" then you will be fine.

Mac
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 01:45 by MacGyver »

MacGyver

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #13 on: Mar 10, 2011, 02:03 »
Question
A gun fires a bullet at the exact moment you drop a bullet from the same height.  Which bullet hits the ground first?

Answers
1. The bullet fired from the gun
2. The bullet dropped from the fired gun barrel height
3. Both hit the ground at the same time



Answer 3

Chapter 6. Newton's Laws in Three Dimensions
6.1 Forces Have No Perpendicular Effects
Suppose you could shoot a rifle and arrange for a second bullet to be dropped from the same height at the exact moment when the first left the barrel. Which would hit the ground first? Nearly everyone expects that the dropped bullet will reach the dirt first, and Aristotle would have agreed. Aristotle would have described it like this. The shot bullet receives some forced motion from the gun. It travels forward for a split second, slowing down rapidly because there is no longer any force to make it continue in motion. Once it is done with its forced motion, it changes to natural motion, i.e. falling straight down. While the shot bullet is slowing down, the dropped bullet gets on with the business of falling, so according to Aristotle it will hit the ground first.


a / A bullet is shot from a gun, and another bullet is simultaneously dropped from the same height. 1. Aristotelian physics says that the horizontal motion of the shot bullet delays the onset of falling, so the dropped bullet hits the ground first. 2. Newtonian physics says the two bullets have the same vertical motion, regardless of their different horizontal motions.

Luckily, nature isn't as complicated as Aristotle thought! To convince yourself that Aristotle's ideas were wrong and needlessly complex, stand up now and try this experiment. Take your keys out of your pocket, and begin walking briskly forward. Without speeding up or slowing down, release your keys and let them fall while you continue walking at the same pace.
You have found that your keys hit the ground right next to your feet. Their horizontal motion never slowed down at all, and the whole time they were dropping, they were right next to you. The horizontal motion and the vertical motion happen at the same time, and they are independent of each other. Your experiment proves that the horizontal motion is unaffected by the vertical motion, but it's also true that the vertical motion is not changed in any way by the horizontal motion. The keys take exactly the same amount of time to get to the ground as they would have if you simply dropped them, and the same is true of the bullets: both bullets hit the ground simultaneously.

These have been our first examples of motion in more than one dimension, and they illustrate the most important new idea that is required to understand the three-dimensional generalization of Newtonian physics:

Forces have no perpendicular effects.
When a force acts on an object, it has no effect on the part of the object's motion that is perpendicular to the force.

In the examples above, the vertical force of gravity had no effect on the horizontal motions of the objects. These were examples of projectile motion, which interested people like Galileo because of its military applications. The principle is more general than that, however. For instance, if a rolling ball is initially heading straight for a wall, but a steady wind begins blowing from the side, the ball does not take any longer to get to the wall. In the case of projectile motion, the force involved is gravity, so we can say more specifically that the vertical acceleration is 9.8 m/s2, regardless of the horizontal motion.

self-check: In the example of the ball being blown sideways, why doesn't the ball take longer to get there, since it has to travel a greater distance? (answer in the back of the PDF version of the book)



Taken from here:
Light and Matter
A picture is available there too.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 02:05 by MacGyver »

ZSchill-Berry

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #14 on: Mar 10, 2011, 02:17 »
Okay just wanted to make sure... I'm pretty good at not over thinking questions on tests, whatever info I get is what I will base my answer off of. I usually try not to come up with my own information to try to come up with a "more accurate answer". Also isn't the general rule of thumb, there is no accurate info you can up with if your making up on your own for a test question that has very few details and is a straight forward question... It would be weird if a bullet shot from a gun dropped the way Aristotle described it would, or at least the diagram showed.

Offline Gamecock

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #15 on: Mar 10, 2011, 03:56 »
Forces have no perpendicular effects.
When a force acts on an object, it has no effect on the part of the object's motion that is perpendicular to the force.

This isn't the case for the bullet fired from the gun, since it will be spinning at a high rate of speed while it flies in the horizontal direction.  This spinning motion will in fact create a force which is perpendicular to the direction of motion.  Therefore, the two bullets will not hit the ground at the same time.

V/R
GC
MIT Graduate ;)
“If the thought police come... we will meet them at the door, respectfully, unflinchingly, willing to die... holding a copy of the sacred Scriptures in one hand and the US Constitution in the other."

Offline mike78756

Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #16 on: Mar 10, 2011, 04:19 »
Let's consider it negligible.  :)
The concept of rifling wasn't accepted until around the 1800s other than the concept of the spinning arrow... Since there weren't stop watches back then when they tested it with the arrow the guy down range couldn't time it.... just sayin  8)

"Did it hit the ground yet?!?!"..."YEAH!!"

GA Southern grad...
Git'R'Done
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 04:34 by mike78756 »

Offline Gamecock

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #17 on: Mar 10, 2011, 04:33 »
The concept of rifling wasn't accepted until around the 1800s GA Southern grad...
Git'R'Done

Actually, Sir Isaac Newton described the phenomena in 1672.

Cheers,
GC

I'm starting to think this needs to be moved into the "nerdy nukes" topic!
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2011, 04:35 by Gamecock »
“If the thought police come... we will meet them at the door, respectfully, unflinchingly, willing to die... holding a copy of the sacred Scriptures in one hand and the US Constitution in the other."

Offline mike78756

Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #18 on: Mar 10, 2011, 04:55 »
Quote
Actually, Sir Isaac Newton described the phenomena in 1672.

With his Remington 700?  :P


Cycoticpenguin

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #19 on: Mar 10, 2011, 08:17 »
my high school does not offer, trig, calc, or physics.

I will try my best taking this test when my recruiter sets a date and time for me to do it. Also my recruiter is a Heli Mechanic so he hasn't had any exposure to the Nuke program to my knowledge.

I call bull$#!^.

And no, your top side loving, helipad buffer doesnt know a damn thing about anything nuclear other then the fact you are 2 points on his billet sheet. Theres a fair chance hes never been on a nuclear powered ship.




Offline Marlin

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #20 on: Mar 10, 2011, 08:26 »
I couldn't find the whole thing but between these two you will get the gist of it.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-dropped-vs-fired-bullet.html




drayer54

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #21 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:04 »
I call bull$#!^.
And no, your top side loving, helipad buffer doesnt know a damn thing about anything nuclear other then the fact you are 2 points on his billet sheet. Theres a fair chance hes never been on a nuclear powered ship.

If you are calling BS on the claim that there is not a place with calculus or physics in high school.... let me tell you, I've seen it... It wasn't pretty.

Offline HydroDave63

Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #22 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:25 »
If you are calling BS on the claim that there is not a place with calculus or physics in high school.... let me tell you, I've seen it... It wasn't pretty.

Well now, ain't you some kind of pretty-boy spoutin' all that there calculus .

B'sides, yer trig is all wrong, what with that "Pi-r-squared" nonsense

Pie are NOT squared

Pie are round

Cornbread are squared!  :P


Offline OldHP

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #23 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:26 »
If you are calling BS on the claim that there is not a place with calculus or physics in high school.... let me tell you, I've seen it... It wasn't pretty.

And now let me tell you why our educational system is going down hill fast (and I'll admit I'm a lot older than most of you).

When I went to HS: Basic Physics was a Freshman (9th grade) class, Basic Trig was a So or Jr class - these were required for all (college prep or not).  Basic Calc was a required class for all college prep (even those headed for an English, History, etc, program).

Now wonder why our children are not getting an adequate education!


JMO  ;)
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The government is like a baby's alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other. Regan

Offline OldHP

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Re: NAPT Test guides or practice tests?
« Reply #24 on: Mar 10, 2011, 10:32 »
Cornbread are squared!  :P

Unless everyone likes the crusted edges, then cornbread are round like in my house.  We fight over the corner pieces of a square.   ;D  [OT] [dowave]
Humor is a wonderful way to prevent hardening of the attitudes! unknown
The government is like a baby's alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other. Regan

 


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