Help | Contact Us
NukeWorker.com
NukeWorker Menu BBS

Author Topic: BBS  (Read 24747 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
BBS
« on: Mar 16, 2010, 07:50 »
Every thing here at SRS begins with some statement about safety. Its cliche to say safety is job one. Regardless, it is a thing to be taken seriously wether you buy into formalized plans like BBS. Behavior based safety, in which you observe your coworkers and ask them about the job ,possible consequences,etc, then write up your observation to data base from which many different conclusions are made. I personally do not like the bbs system. Step away from me quick the lightning is about to strike. I think most observations are worthless and done just to get the numbers up and to get your name on the posters so the boss can see. I have put it to the test and found management sadly lacking. There must be some value to it other than doe likes it. What I do like, and here,you can hear the murmur of the vast multitude quieting down so they can have my opinion,( that is self deprecation if you must know)  is the intigrated safety management system (isms). First you define the scope of work, then identify the hazards,plan the work,do the work, and then feed back. This is intirely logical. But it all comes and goes. The weakest part is the feed back. This never seems to get done. And at times the worker is cut out of the loop. At that point it becomes useless. So,here it is SAFETY,SAFETY,SAFETY, when talked about or written, but when it comes to the doing, it fluctuates, the watch goes to sleep or out for a smoke. Outside of personal integrity what can be done? How are things where you work? MH

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #1 on: Mar 26, 2010, 09:06 »
No takers on BBS? Is anyone else doing this at your site? What do you think about it?

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #2 on: Mar 26, 2010, 11:27 »
No takers on BBS? Is anyone else doing this at your site? What do you think about it?

Like what? The 24 hour safety culture, or ISMS (Integrated Safety Management Systems). Pick one there have been many, they are about as tired as the mirrors that say "This is who is responsible for your safety". These programs all have the same goal with different approaches.

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #3 on: Apr 23, 2010, 12:38 »
http://www.behavior.org/safety/ try this site for an into to BBS.

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #4 on: Apr 23, 2010, 03:55 »
BBS does not look like a usable system, it looks like a guide to develop one. I see components that fit into DOE ISMS. I also see that BBS is one of many tabs on their Psychology departments behavioral studies menu. It would seem that it would apply as much as the broken windows theory applies to law enforcement.

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #5 on: Apr 24, 2010, 11:30 »
The fault in BBs, ISMS, and any other safety "program" is that it all goes on paper.  It looks good on paper.  Before long, you are so focused on metrics that you lose sight of the actual behaviors that result in safe/unsafe work.  Here's what you do.  Get a safety professional involved (actually involved on the floor with the workforce), get management behind you, get supervision on your side, get the workers to have faith and confidence in what you say.  WORK with them to SOLVE safety problems and develop workable solutions in real time on the job - instead of reading them canned toolbox speeches, feeding them buzzwords, and pointing out deficiencies that you are not interested in correcting.
Leave the charts and graphs in the office.  Leave you slogans and banners in the box.  Be with the people while they are working, learn what they do and how they do it, and never point out a problem unless you are ready to come up with a solution to it.
The easy (and ineffective) way to manage safety is to observe without knowing what you are watching, write up cards, compile data, make charts, plaster slogans on the walls, give totally irrelevant safety speeches, and be a "seagull" safety manager (refer to http://www.nukeworker.com/forum/index.php/topic,23667.0.html for the meaning of that).
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

Chimera

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #6 on: Apr 25, 2010, 02:14 »
Get a safety professional involved?  Get management to back you?  You just doomed your idea to failure.  The "safety professional" doesn't want to leave his office and "management" only wants the pretty graphs and the bonus.

I've had better success, relative to the actual job site and the workers, by picking up the trash, moving the extension cord, helping while suiting up and just listening than I have ever seen come from the so-called professionals or management.

I've worked with you, BC, and I love your style.  Unfortunately, there is only one of you and too many jobs.  While I can't necessarily do what you do, I can do what I do - and that's a start.  While it may be a tired cliche, safety really does begin with me regardless of the fancy "system" that may be in place.

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #7 on: Apr 25, 2010, 04:29 »
Get a safety professional involved?  Get management to back you?  You just doomed your idea to failure.  The "safety professional" doesn't want to leave his office and "management" only wants the pretty graphs and the bonus.

I've had better success, relative to the actual job site and the workers, by picking up the trash, moving the extension cord, helping while suiting up and just listening than I have ever seen come from the so-called professionals or management.
I've worked with you, BC, and I love your style.  Unfortunately, there is only one of you and too many jobs.  While I can't necessarily do what you do, I can do what I do - and that's a start.  While it may be a tired cliche, safety really does begin with me regardless of the fancy "system" that may be in place.

   That is applying the "Broken Windows theory" of behavior modification, it worked for NYPD to drastically drop the crime rate. Changing the environment of the workers is a far better solution that boring them with what they should do at the daily briefings. Of course raffling off a pickup truck with earned "safety chits" at the end of a project works too!!  ;)

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #8 on: Apr 25, 2010, 05:32 »
I wish they would bring back those days.  NYPD doesn't seem to give a crap about those "quality of life" issues anymore.  This city is sliding backward.  But, it is still the Capital of the World.

Raffles are not safety awards.  They are bribes to keep people from reporting their injuries.  You see a lot of "duck tape band-aids" on those jobs.

You want a reward for working safely?  Tomorrow is your reward for working safely today.  (Okay, that isn't bad as far as slogans go.  I just couldn't help myself.)

When I say "get the safety professional involved", I really mean "safety professional, get yourself involved".  I have some really dirty gloves hanging off my belt.  I spend almost all of my time with the people who are doing the work.  They SEE me picking up the cords and trash.  I lead them by example, and they are quick to learn.  Being part of the team is more effective than being a referee all the time.

Tell me, and I'll forget.
Show me, and I'll remember.
Involve me, and I'll understand.
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #9 on: Apr 27, 2010, 02:09 »
Please  explain "broken windows" theory.
While I am not defending BBS or any other program, they all have their good aspects and good intentions, and I know, its a long road to hell and getting paved and repaved with the same good intentions.
Most are passive in nature and only describe an act,  environment, or precursor.And sometimes we have little choice but to work with what we have. Here at SRS there are app.9000 employees. A lot are managers and engineers,not counting the DOE folks that provide oversite.DOE likes all these programs, so in an effort to make the "customer" happy, management says do it. So we do. I have seen a relatively simple preplan last over three hours. I have participated in safety stand downs,job hazard analyses, and the actual job itself. What they want us to do is this: after defining the scope of work and analyzing and mitigating( as much as possible)the hazard, we do a thorough preplan with reverse briefing,including discussion of HPI error precursors and are strongly encouraged to do a BBS observation during the job.
BBS is voluntary though the performance of observations is directly tied to a salaried persons wage increase.
The problem I have is that the first line managers are not allowed to do any work. So it is largely vicarious to them, especially if a resperator is involved. This is not to say they dont love us workerbees or that they are not concerned for our safety. They are. But there is little they can do being on the outside looking in. They are less engaged.
Also there is passive consent. Not just here but likely everywhere.By that I mean workers are allowed to be lax on something one supervisor feels is not as important as something else. And this is where top down,or bottom up,personal integrity,responsability comes in. You have to do what is right wether you are told or not,wether someone is looking or not. Wether you may get into trouble or not, though that one is tricky; when do you risk the financial support for your family?
So,given the complexities of the group dynamic, what works? Perhaps I have answered my question.

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #10 on: Apr 27, 2010, 03:31 »
"Fixing Broken Windows" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixing_Broken_Windows) was initially written in reference to criminology and neighborhoods, but as I reference it, it is probably better explained in the book Tipping Point  ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tipping_Point ) which tries to explain how small things make a big difference. Malcolm Gladwell has written several books that deal with behavior, I would recommend all of them.
« Last Edit: Apr 27, 2010, 06:47 by Marlin »

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #11 on: Apr 27, 2010, 03:36 »
Please  explain "broken windows" theory.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixing_Broken_Windows
This article discusses the BWT.  Basically, it comes down to the idea the if you do not tolerate small, seemingly harmless, infractions, the result will be a decrease in greater crimes.  If you fix the broken windows, the vandals won't be as likely to break more=>there will be fewer property crimes=>there sill be fewer violent crimes.  Ergo, fixing the small things fixes the big things.
Rudy Giuliani used to make the MTA clean the graffiti off the subway trains every day.  This took time, when everybody was sick of their train being late every morning, they started to be less and less tolerant of graffiti artists vandalizing the trains.  When the trains became cleaner, and ran on time, society became easier to live in.  He made the cops ticket people for littering, double-parking, riding bicycles on the sidewalk, etc.  As New Yorkers began to notice the new orderliness of their society, they began to feel entitled to live in an orderly, clean, polite city - instead of the chaos that reigned before.  They became less tolerant of unacceptable behavior AND straightened up their own a little as well.
The theory has its flaws and detractors, but the basic premise is that people adapt to fit in to the culture that surrounds them.  Kids use drugs if their friends are using drugs.  EVERYBODY speeds as long as everybody else is speeding.  "Keeping up with traffic" is the way of the road because it is the way of life.

BBS is voluntary though the performance of observations is directly tied to a salaried persons wage increase.

This is where you get your pile of fluff.  Managers should not be doing BBS observations.  First, they get PAID to supervise.  So, why should they have to fill out a stupid card?  Second, they generally write up more positive observations on their own work groups.  The whole point of the observations is that any worker, at any level, can take time to observe any work group at any time objectively, provide a critique and coaching, and LEARN SOMETHING from the experience.  Compiling data on observations is pointless if people only tell what you want to hear - or if they use it to make their work group look better in comparison to others.  Basically, management uses BBS cards as a self-congratulatory exercise and to placate themselves into believing that they are promoting a safe work place.  Spend a week looking at the pile of cards that gets turned in, and you'll see what I mean.

Where BBS earns its money is when the rank and file do the observations.  They look at the job from a  
worker's point of view.  They get a chance to look at things that they usually take for granted.  By taking an objective view at someone else working, the observer gets to concentrate on the safety and quality aspects of the job.  They will notice things that those involved in the job don't notice or aren't giving enough attention to.  So, by doing a BBS observation, the observer actually gets to improve his or her own safety performance, if he or she so desires.  Otherwise, they are just filling out the cards because they have to, and get nothing out of it.

The Reinforcement aspect of BBS has a good chance of working if it is  1) Sincere, 2) Meaningful, 3) Timely, 4) Appropriate, and 5) Consistent.

The BWT and BBS are similar in that they are peer oriented.  Peer pressure to work safely is more effective than management pressure.  Creating an environment where it is acceptable to the workers and their peers to work safely and encourage each other is a difficult task, but it can work if management buys in and backs it up.

The raffles are a well-intentioned, but misguided, attempt to create this peer regulated atmosphere.  Getting hurt can decrease a co-worker's chance (or everyone's) of winning that XBox or television or pickup truck.  So, in theory, workers will encourage their peers to be safe so that the prizes will stay available.  But, too much focus on the reward leads to cheating.  If the reward is a safe workplace, instead of a Harley-Davidson Screaming Eagle Street Glider, it won't be as sexy, but it will be the correct reward for accomplishing the correct objective.  People will hide cuts, bruises, sprains, and even fractures to get a shot at winning a $36,000 cycle.  But, to get a safe workplace they will avoid them, report them, prevent them, learn from them, and move on in the right direction.

Check out these links.
http://www.ishn.com/Articles/Column/9a4d76bcb30c7010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____

http://www.safetyperformance.com/pdf/Articles/2004/AreyouaSuccessSeekeroraFailureAvoider.pdf
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #12 on: Apr 27, 2010, 06:44 »
The raffles are a well-intentioned, but misguided, attempt to create this peer regulated atmosphere.  Getting hurt can decrease a co-worker's chance (or everyone's) of winning that XBox or television or pickup truck.  So, in theory, workers will encourage their peers to be safe so that the prizes will stay available.  But, too much focus on the reward leads to cheating.  If the reward is a safe workplace, instead of a Harley-Davidson Screaming Eagle Street Glider, it won't be as sexy, but it will be the correct reward for accomplishing the correct objective.  People will hide cuts, bruises, sprains, and even fractures to get a shot at winning a $36,000 cycle.  But, to get a safe workplace they will avoid them, report them, prevent them, learn from them, and move on in the right direction.

When the raffle is done by chits (or wooden nickles on my current project) that are awarded for doing the right thing this is avoided. If the chances at the raffle are given to people seen doing a job safely or for submiting a suggestion for improvement, then safety, not production becomes the driving force. You are right that using safety milestones is counter productive in modifying safety behavior but not all raffles are done using accident rate as its basis.

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #13 on: Apr 28, 2010, 07:46 »
Oh yeah.  Absolutely.  A little reward for doing the right thing is a winner.  That is the kind of positive reinforcement that has shown to be effective.  But, what do you do when somebody makes a bad choice?  Do you make them give you back a wooden nickel if you observe an unsafe behavior?
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

Offline Marlin

  • Forum Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 12083
  • Total likes: 519
  • Karma: 5129
  • Gender: Male
  • Stop Global Whining!!!
Re: BBS
« Reply #14 on: Apr 29, 2010, 07:54 »
Oh yeah.  Absolutely.  A little reward for doing the right thing is a winner.  That is the kind of positive reinforcement that has shown to be effective.  But, what do you do when somebody makes a bad choice?  Do you make them give you back a wooden nickel if you observe an unsafe behavior?

   Public flogging and the stocks.   8)



   We both know that current PC group hug management styles require coaching and positive reinforcement.  ::)

Iceman24601

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #15 on: Apr 29, 2010, 11:41 »
Where I work we go to extreme measures to ensure that every analyst is safe and feels safe.  We spend 10's of hours a week working directly with the analysts and try to be positive, positive, positive.  As for my safety crew, though, I'm blunt and direct that I expect 110% from them and expect them to work harder than anyone else. ::)  We have a good management backed safety culture but it seems that no one will spend the extra five minutes to double check our work so we have to be 100% on the ball every day, every time.  I'm honest with my crew that it's probably unfair but that's why we have job security... no one else wants to do what we do everyday!   ;)  Love this thread by the way!

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #16 on: Apr 30, 2010, 09:32 »
Thank you. Now I can understand what I call passive consent. When a supervisor allows workers to ignore practices like wearing safety glasses when required (weather you agree or not) steel toe shoes, proper monitoring techniques, etc.  Some things are considered insignificant and are not enforced or rather encouraged.
The insidious nature of this environment is this: if I am the only one to hold the line day after day and am not backed up then I am the bad guy. I get tired of being the ---hole that makes them wear the glasses, shoes,etc.  And if I backslide once I lose all credibility.
I will rethink my thinking. I tend to look for large issues and will now reconsider.
So BWT is like the Russian saying " look after the kopecks and the rubles take care of themselves".
Thank you, I have accomplished something with this thread; I have learned something.MH
« Last Edit: Apr 30, 2010, 01:56 by BeerCourt »

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #17 on: Apr 30, 2010, 02:12 »
Don't swing too far on that pendulum, dude.  Being a safety glass monitor, or stomping on shoes, isn't going to get you there.  The whole idea is this:  Safe behavior depends on choices.  If good choices lead to positive results, they will be repeated.  If bad choices lead to good results, they will be repeated too.  The objective of the BWT, it to make peer pressure a motivator.  So, if you wear your harness and get a good feedback from your peers, you will wear your harness.  If the negative reaction to leaving the harness in the box is greater than the ease and comfort of not wearing it, you will (again) wear your harness.
See?  This is the tie in to BBS.  It's cultural.  If your culture is one where you will be "one of the crowd" for doing the right thing, and ostracized for making the wrong choices, you will try to do what is right so you will fit in.  Conversely, if your culture makes it "uncool" to wear your PPE, and leaving a pile of trash at your worksite is accepted, you will do things that even you don't agree with just to fit in.
Really, if you look at the workplace like an advanced version of High School, this all makes sense.
Your Russian maxim is still on point, though.  Encouraging and rewarding small positive choices and behaviors will lead to a baseline culture that is safety positive.  Therefore the big things won't be so difficult.

Let me quote Archimedes here (with some parenthetical comments):
Give me a lever (peer pressure), and a fulcrum (standards), and a firm place to stand (management support) and I will move the Earth.
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

Chimera

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2010, 10:55 »
Daaang, BC!  As always, you are the master (no sarcasm intended or implied).  If'n you have no objections, I'm going to use that modified quote.

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2010, 01:05 »
NO, I don't want to be the safety police. I use the glasses as as easy example. I am looking for expanded perspective. Thats why the feedback is important to me, and a lot of other people judging by the number of views. In my years in the field I have seen a lot and am trying to understand a little better. Folks I really appreciate the posts. If you are not registered, please do, and post. Some of the things we discuss on this site have the potential to influence in a good way. So please share the information.
I think at worst these programs are endured but get people to think a little more about safety. At best they may motivate someone to behave differently and save a lot of pain and suffering. After all, its not about looking good to management or DOE,etc. Its about ( heres the cliche) being able to live your life without a debilitating injury, or the guilt of knowing you could have prevented one. Not all accidents are tragic of course,but you get my point.
Am I my brothers keeper?    Yes.
to a degree.  MH

Iceman24601

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2010, 04:33 »
Not all accidents are tragic of course,but you get my point.
Am I my brothers keeper?    Yes.
to a degree.  MH

I still lose sleep over an accident in the lab several years back.  There was nothing I could have done to prevent it but it still happened on my watch.  Luckily the worst that happened was it scared the s*&! out of a few people but at least two of our best analysts never went back to that lab.  One of my motto's for when the lab gets on my case about what seems like a minor issue is "It only takes one mistake!"  One mistake changed the livelihood of two analysts and a lot of lost sleep.

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2010, 08:51 »
BBS is intended to lower accident/injury rates by making you more aware of unsafe acts and or environments; to make you more aware. The numbers are compiled and statistics are analyzed for trending etc. Is this an industry wide practice or mainly  DOE?.
At worst it does no harm, at best it really does lower the accident rate through enhanced awareness.
For those participating in the discussion, thank you. The rest of you lurkers need to add to the discussion.

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2010, 11:45 »
See above

mostlyharmless

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #23 on: Jun 16, 2010, 07:52 »
BBS works to some degree. But we will never know about the rest of the world if you do not post.

JeremyCantrell

  • Guest
Re: BBS
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2011, 09:38 »
I'll weigh in a bit.

There are different aspects of BBS.

Most seem "disenfranchised" with the Corporate version of Behavior Based Safety...the observations et. al the benchmarking of these and the set requirements.

I meet these goals because if not, you will be inundated with droves of cubicle dwellers who tell you how to be safe whteher they understand the job being performed or not.

BBS for me, is being in a supportive role as safety. The workers are there for one reason, production, to get the job done.
The root of this is keeping people safe without "Punishment".

I've heard it stated by many Safety Professionals that you cannot have Compliance without Enforcement.

I do not believe this.
The basis for my approach to BBS is due to the fact that nobody truly wants to get hurt. You don't see people running around smashing fingers for the fun of it.
So, it's up to the Safety Professional to have it all make more sense to work safely than to not work safely.

Sure, enforcing safety through Firings, Days off, Fines is much easier for the average HSE/EHS, it requires no creativity or thought...you see an infraction...you report it.

I always ask myself...will this person continue to be safe after I walk away...if not..I've failed in my approach.


So.
I first attempt to establish credibility, without this, the workers do not hear or heed any words that come out of your mouth.
Secondly, I set the rules and only change them under very, very necessary circumstances and I make it clear that any deviations will be worked out with me involved.
Finally..I go to great lengths to stick to these rules implicitly.

Couple these with mutual respect and competency and 99% of people I've worked with will do things as safely as possible.

I'm going on near 10k hours worked as Safety without a Time Lost Accident. I've had 2 recordable's in the last year...1 was Tendinitis that was given a prescription for anti-inflammatory and the other was an bug bite that swelled up to massive proportions.

Until my "system" stops being effective I'll stick to it.

Yes..this was somewhat of a quick mind dump and not "prepared"...so take it how you wish.

Offline namlive

Re: BBS
« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2011, 08:06 »
I am against the BBS system used at SRS. Most of the "observations" are worthless and table-topped just to get numbers and parking spaces. In ten years in the program I have seen maybe a half dozen done correctly.

BBS teaches that workers are stupid and cause accidents. It blames the worker. The original study on which BBS was based claimed workers who got injured were of a low class. When you blame the worker for every type of accident by falling back on, "they needed to be more aware of their surroundings" i.e. meaning there were hazards in the area the plant didn't want to address, you get an atmosphere were accidents are simply NOT reported, so de facto you get a better safety record.  We used to have one cooking type accident a month. Since BBS started blaming people, that number has gone to zero.

BBS should have been insituted first with managers. They should have been taught that their ignoring bad safety practices makes them responsible for accidents. Then at that point BBS is introduced to the workers. BBS observations should be mandatory and assigned to every job to be done effectively. SRS did NOT use the original BBS system used effectively by P&G, but rather they bought a modified plan from DuPont, who they in turn pay to see how effective is their safety program.  Try to guess the results of that?

It is not that management doesn't know this. I have written up 4 pages of how the system doesn't work using specific examples here at SRS. I have given this information to multiple levels of management, including Munns when he was here.  As long as they have the numbers and don't have to address safety issues which cost money, they are happy.

No one gets out alive.

Offline Already Gone

  • Curmudgeon At Large
  • Very Heavy User
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
  • Total likes: 4
  • Karma: 3387
  • Gender: Male
  • Did I say that out loud?
Re: BBS
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2011, 09:21 »
It really burns my but when I hear that "situational awareness" is the preventative measure that should be - or should have been - taken.

The General Duty Clause, and the CFR sections that back it up, require that the workplace be free of known hazards.  They DO NOT provide an exception to this duty as long as the employees are aware of the hazards.

This goes in my file along with "just be careful".  Situational awareness is just nuclear speak for "just be careful".  Both phrases are the last resort of a management that has failed to remove hazards and provide protection against those that couldn't be removed.

Read into this, and it really means "we aren't going to make your work safe, but try to keep from getting hurt anyway"

Real BBS has to be founded upon a workplace that is safe, with procedures to ensure it stays safe, and management support to ensure that the procedures are followed.  The observations should be done by the workers as well as management.  They should ask only, "did management provide effective training and appropriate safety measures?" and "did the workers use those measures as they were trained?"

Everything beyond that is fluff.
"To be content with little is hard; to be content with much, impossible." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

 


NukeWorker ™ is a registered trademark of NukeWorker.com ™, LLC © 1996-2020 All rights reserved.
All material on this Web Site, including text, photographs, graphics, code and/or software, are protected by international copyright/trademark laws and treaties. Unauthorized use is not permitted. You may not modify, copy, reproduce, republish, upload, post, transmit or distribute, in any manner, the material on this web site or any portion of it. Doing so will result in severe civil and criminal penalties, and will be prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.
Privacy Statement | Terms of Use | Code of Conduct | Spam Policy | Advertising Info | Contact Us | Forum Rules | Password Problem?