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Melrose

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Halloween History
« on: Oct 31, 2007, 09:29 »

           HAPPY HALLOWEEN

I've heard different stories regarding the birth of Halloween, and the history behind some noted characters.... jack-o-lanterns, witches riding brooms, ghosts, the use of masks etc.

What's your take, use the net.... if you must.  There you'll find conflicting more than supporting history.  Which interests you more?  Which have you heard before?

Have a safe night!
« Last Edit: Oct 31, 2007, 09:31 by Melrose »

illegalsmile

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Re: Halloween History
« Reply #1 on: Oct 31, 2007, 11:30 »
« Last Edit: Oct 31, 2007, 11:34 by illegalsmile »

Offline McBride

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Re: Halloween History
« Reply #2 on: Oct 31, 2007, 12:14 »
Well, it was on this day 490 years ago that Martin Luther nailed his 95 Thesis to the door of Wittenberg Castle.  Back then this day was known as All Saints Day.


Melrose

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Re: Halloween History
« Reply #3 on: Oct 31, 2007, 12:48 »
Well, it was on this day 490 years ago that Martin Luther nailed his 95 Thesis to the door of Wittenberg Castle.  Back then this day was known as All Saints Day.

That would be November 1st.  ;)

Offline McBride

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Re: Halloween History
« Reply #4 on: Oct 31, 2007, 04:46 »
Sorry,sorry I muddied history a bit.

October 31 was All Hallows Even, and was the day Luther nailed his letter to the castle door.  He merely did it in preparation for All Saints Day or All Hallows Day, knowing that everybody in town would go through those doors.

All Hallows Even was shorteded to All Hallows E'en and became Halloween.  The reason it has become largely about ghosts and ghouls?  Long story short . . .BLAME THE IRISH! Basically it was melded with the customs already in existence and blended with other festivals.  This is much the same as Christmas losing its Christian heritage and becomming a season of giving and receiving gifts, reindeer, Frost and Santa.

A lot of people wonder whether Christians should celebrate.  I am, and I do.  Heck, I love dressing up as much as my kids!  If that is one of the things you were wondering (and I get asked A LOT this time of year) don't let it bother you.  I don't think God is upset by people who have a little fun!

Okay, i am done with my dissertation . . . where do I turn it in?
-McBride

Offline Camella Black

Re: Halloween History
« Reply #5 on: Oct 31, 2007, 10:01 »
Another holiday that began with the ancient Celts, Halloween was first celebrated as Samhain. It was believed that the dead could visit the earth on this night and costumes were worn by people so they would blend in.

Irish traditions for Halloween include Colcannon which is potatos, kale and raw onions mixed together and eaten and carving of turnips which led to carving pumpkins. Apples were used to in many games including one performed by young girls who would attempt to peel an apple without breaking the peeling, when done they would throw the peeling on the floor and look for a shape of an initial which was suppose to lead to the name of the boy they might marry.

Traditions at our house: pumpkin pancakes, lots of candy, lights, pumpkins and witches brooms...

 


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