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Offline UncaBuffalo

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Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« on: Jun 30, 2010, 09:16 »
Is this becoming more common in the industry?  I just got exposed to the idea.  Seems like a great way to inform yourself of safety concerns before you enter an area... 

Does anyone have any helpful hints for making the system work?



(For those of you who haven't run across Hazard Mapping yet:  Maps are posted at each area with all identified safety concerns shown on the map...much like the radiological surveys we are familiar with in nuclear.  Each concern is assigned a level of concern (1 to 4 at our utility).  We also keep a list of problems that are mitigated, for trending purposes.)
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mostlyharmless

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #1 on: Jun 30, 2010, 11:22 »
The only thing we have at srs that comes close is placards (on boundaries , typically nonrad, set up by consruction ) noting entry requirements ,hazard ,ppe required. We dont post copies of surveys at entrances either. Dont have status boards.
I,m wondering if safety will move towards positions similar to HPs.


Offline retired nuke

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #2 on: Jun 30, 2010, 03:03 »
We just started it at my site. Others within the fleet are ahead of us, but we have begun.

I see it also as a great tool to identify and prioritize areas for improvement - design changes, additional safety equipment, etc.

Still requires Union and Management to work together, but it has promise...
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Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #3 on: Jun 30, 2010, 03:56 »
JMNSHO:

Not a chance.

At a 'typical' refueling outage (if there is such a thing) RPs may out number the safety reps 20:1.  There is no way the safety reps could approach their job in the same manner as the RPs do.  Impossible. 

Regarding the concept of hazard ID maps, well to put it simply, they are all show, no go.  They may be of limited use during task planning or a PJB but that is about it.  Posting a hazard ID map at the entrance to a room and expect the craft (or any other employee) to stop before entering, read it, understand it, verify it, etc., etc., etc. is a dream. The second time an employee enters the area the map would become part of the background noise just like all of the other signs we inundate folks with.

SD 


I agree that I'm not going to look at it the second time in...but most people only look at survey maps when conditions change...right?

I haven't formed an opinion about the hazard maps yet, but they were useful on a job the other day.  I was able to familiarize myself with a new work area without having to ask any dumb questions or, worse yet, listening to someone drone on for 15 minutes.
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

mostlyharmless

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #4 on: Jun 30, 2010, 04:49 »
SD your probably right,you could move towards that direction but not very far. More field representation would not necessarily be a good thing. If safety is not an natural part of the culture then a field rep is just someone else not to get caught by. Its more important for me to do the right thing than to be reminded to do the right thing. But its nice to have someone there if my attention lapses.
The maps are a good idea. Perhaps incorporate the data in the rad maps allready posted if it doesnt clutter the map making it difficult to read quickly.

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #5 on: Jun 30, 2010, 05:10 »
The only thing we have at srs that comes close is placards (on boundaries , typically nonrad, set up by consruction ) noting entry requirements ,hazard ,ppe required. We dont post copies of surveys at entrances either. Dont have status boards.
I,m wondering if safety will move towards positions similar to HPs.



Initially, you might need a few people to put the maps together.  After that, I think one person would keep up with it fairly easily at most sites.  I base that estimate on only using it for static conditions.  I don't see it being very useful in a dynamic working site and think you would cover rapidly changing conditions the way you do now.  (Pre-job briefs, on-the-job safety reps, etc)
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline Rennhack

Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #6 on: Jun 30, 2010, 05:59 »
They may be of limited use during task planning or a PJB but that is about it.

I Love PB&J!  What?  There is no PB&J?  It's a PJB? This meeting sucks.  I'm heading to the Cafeteria.



What do you mean I'm off topic?  But I'm so witty.

Um.... SAFETY.
« Last Edit: Jun 30, 2010, 06:00 by Rennhack »

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #7 on: Jun 30, 2010, 07:02 »
I think documenting static unsafe conditions on maps and then making the maps available on the intranet would be better than posting them at the entrance to the area.  This way, planners could use them to assist in planning safety into the work packages.  Supervisors and foremen could pull them up to help them perform PJBs.  Not much different than the way many sites have done hazard characterizations of all known confined spaces on the property.  The confined space characterizations really come in handy, especially for first time entrants or travelers new to the site.

Like you said earlier, you will not take a look at the safety map the second time you enter the area, unless conditions have changed.  I am not sure how you would know that the conditions have changed without looking at the map or going in the area and finding out the old fashioned way.

SD  

I agree that a central, electronically-accessible group of hazard maps would be a significant improvement on just posting them at the jobsite.  I am going to recommend we implement that at my utility.  Thanks!

I think most changed conditions would be covered at morning meetings.  I'm strictly looking at this from a house-geek @ operating plant standpoint right now...I'm sure I will have to re-think a lot of my ideas when it comes outage time and things start to morph rapidly...

Anyway, for now I see most affected workgroups keeping up with conditions via their morning meeting - and anyone else would have a posted hazard map to refresh themselves on.  Hazard mapping is NOT intended to replace use of 'Danger' or 'Caution' tape, so when any new hazards were introduced to an area they would still be flagged.  That way I wouldn't walk into a tiger-trap just because I didn't read the map on my second (or eighteenth) visit to a room.   (Similar to the way I approach my use of radiological survey maps...if something changed, I expect a posting change in the area to keep me from getting crapped up, alarming my dosimeter, or whatever.)
« Last Edit: Jun 30, 2010, 07:11 by UncaBuffalo »
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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #8 on: Jun 30, 2010, 10:01 »
PB&J is very safe
 Almost no chance of food poisoning.
 No need for a sharp knife for preparation, limiting the chance of laceration injuries.
 Unless dropped J side down almost no chance of slip and fall injuries.
 
 Sorry,with respect.
 Alan

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #9 on: Jul 01, 2010, 05:07 »
PB&J is very safe
 Almost no chance of food poisoning.
 No need for a sharp knife for preparation, limiting the chance of laceration injuries.
Unless dropped J side down almost no chance of slip and fall injuries.
 
 Sorry,with respect.
 Alan

So, the dropped PB&J would be marked on the map...probably assigned a Level 1/Yellow (Low Consequence Physical Hazard).  Updated maps would be put at jobsite & on intranet.  A Deficiency Request would be generated to inform SSTs of need to mitigate hazard.  The DR number would be tracked on the hazard spreadsheet until completed.  Then, the PB&J incident would be marked 'resolved' on hazard spreadsheet & added to Success Trending for presentation to Management.  Hazard map would again be updated and reposted at jobsite & intranet.

Much better than the old way, right?  ;)
« Last Edit: Jul 01, 2010, 05:18 by UncaBuffalo »
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline UncaBuffalo

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #10 on: Jul 01, 2010, 09:22 »
Getting closer.  However, total time of event to hazard mitigation, three months.

A slightly better scenario:

We were proactive and developed a dropped object prevention plan and implemented it site-wide.  The event never occurred.

But, we all know even the best plans will not prevent 100% of unwanted events from occurring.  So, we also were proactive and nurtured a workforce who took responsibility for their actions.  After the dropped object event (DOE) occurred and created a slip hazard, our thoughtful employee warned others in the immediate area, demarcated the area with caution ribbon and signs.  Yes, the ribbon and signs were located nearby in one of the many "Safety Supply Carts" we placed throughout the plant.  Our thoughtful employee then cleaned the result of his DOE (no pun intended).  Total time of event to hazard mitigation, thirty minutes.



The good news is...WE do have a 100% solution!



The bad new is...it's currently tied up in the safety council.  We can't come to a resolution on which to ban on-site...Peanut Butter?  ...or Jelly?   ;)



 
« Last Edit: Jul 03, 2010, 02:29 by UncaBuffalo »
The days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations, I have really good days. -Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline Phurst

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #11 on: Jul 01, 2010, 09:32 »
How about any new safety issues sent as a text message to every employees cell phone. Get the new smart phones and survey maps can be sent that way. Then we get rid of any of us old guys who need glasses to see the tiny screen or are too challenged to get a smart phone.
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mostlyharmless

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #12 on: Jul 01, 2010, 10:11 »
At SRS we would have an immediate safety stand down for 48 hrs, full pb&j stoppage would occur,  we would discuss at length the dropped pb&j event,look industry wide(really all we need to do is go to nukeworker .com for a solution) for incidences involving pb&js, upper level management would come to our site and take full responsibility and assure us that all pb&j events are preventable. We would then go 20 million hrs without a lost pb&j event  and would receive coffee mugs. Worker pride would sky rocket.

mostlyharmless

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Re: Hazard Mapping/Systems of Safety
« Reply #13 on: Jul 01, 2010, 10:17 »
Beercourt save us. Please.

 


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